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Would like to mount a Western plow on to a 2001 Cherokee

Discussion in 'Jeeps' started by Mrfnhappy, Jan 30, 2017.

  1. Mrfnhappy

    Mrfnhappy Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Hello guys,
    I could use some helpful information that would help me mount a Western plow on to my Jeep Cherokee. I called around and can't purchase the bracket for the vehicle, so I'm admitting that I over think the fabrication of what's needed. I have a used plow system that I can purchase, but don't want to commit unless I have it thought through. How has anyone made their bracket mount? Did you cup it around the unibody? I planned to use 3/8" steel, and grade 8 hardware. Am I on track? Or over building?
     
  2. gunsworth

    gunsworth Senior Member
    Messages: 523

    Mrfnhappy likes this.
  3. Mrfnhappy

    Mrfnhappy Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Thank you, that is very helpful.
     
  4. MLG

    MLG Senior Member
    from WI
    Messages: 187

    Have you started yet? I've made a couple mounts, maybe toss out a few ideas.

    1) Push-bar type: On a Toyota truck I made a plow mount many years ago because like yours no commercially available mount was available for my year. It turned out great, and I still have it and it worked well for many years. I eventually realized I didn't have to follow the normal rules and could make whatever I wanted. So, what I did was fabricate up an assembly that more or less looked like a push bar like you might see on a hummer, and incorporated the pump in the center of the push bar. The idea was I could remove the pump in the summer and put a winch in the same place. I made the pattern of the main vertical arms out of cardboard until I had them 'right' and then transferred the pattern to a sheet of 1/4" and cut it out. With the plow I bought I had the lower section that the plow legs hook up to so I used that. but I could have just as well fabbed up whatever was necessary. I also brought my plow closer to the truck and tucked it up more than normal so it was easier on the frame. Most plow mounts stick the plow too far out.

    I cut my stuff out with a torch back then, but since picked up a Chinese plasma cutter. If funds permit, now would be a great time to add a plasma cutter to your tool collection. I use mine a lot more than I thought I would, and it would make a plow fab job actually enjoyable compared to other cutting methods. Best $500 I spent in a long time.

    2) Conventional type: For my current XJ, the owner before me fabbed up a mount. They attached a piece of like 3/8" bar ...maybe 3 or 4" tall alongside of each frame rail and welded a piece of channel iron across the front. On that main piece of channel iron, they welded a Meyer hoop like the old conventional style which supports the top arm and pump. Now the next part was the more amazing piece of fabricating that I wouldn't have thought about. It was somewhat shade-tree, but elegantly simple: What the guy did, who built it, was take several pieces of 3/8" x 3" by, maybe 5" long ea. and overlapping the ends until he got about down to where the arms would attach. He probably just held the pieces of metal in place with a couple channel locks till he got it 'right', then tacked and welded the pieces together. At the bottom he welded a lower piece of angle iron where the plow arms attach like on a 'conventional' mount.

    I guess what I'm saying is, I would normally try to cut one piece out and heat and bend it to look 'factory' but this guy just welded several pieces together and it's been really strong ...never broke all these years.

    I made a few improvements when I got it: I added heavy-duty front springs and air shocks (the plow the PO had was too heaaavvvy), and eventually I replaced the Meyer blade with a much lighter SUV-style Western plow 6' or 6.5' long ...I can't remember. The older 7' Meyer made the vehicle handle poorly, was really hard on all the steering/suspension and 4x4 stuff, and it didn't plow any better with the tougher plow, actually worse than the lighter plow that's on there now. As it is now, I don't really need the air shocks anymore. But if you have standard springs, maybe you would want to consider springs or the air shocks. Air shocks are somewhat 'bouncy' ...the heavier springs don't seem to make it ride any roughter than before because they're 'progressive'.

    Let us see some pictures of your project as you go!!

    Some Pics:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017
    Mrfnhappy likes this.
  5. MLG

    MLG Senior Member
    from WI
    Messages: 187

    Oh btw, I would recommend you position it so the plow arms are mounted as parallel to the ground as possible when in the 'down' (plowing) position. If they aren't parallel, then the ends of the blade are going to want to flex up or down as you pivot it through it's range of motion ...to push snow left/right.
     
    Mrfnhappy likes this.
  6. Mrfnhappy

    Mrfnhappy Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    I have started, but get to over thinking everything easily. So progress has been slow. I did get a good recommendation about beefing up the bumper mount area of the unibody. Plus I bought mounting plates that bolt onto the truck and will take the brackets once I get that far. Your point about the mounting height for the swing is very helpful.
    Thanks for all your information and experience with this. I feel much better about putting it together and using it.
    I will post some pictures now that you mentioned that.
     
  7. MLG

    MLG Senior Member
    from WI
    Messages: 187

    Sounds good. Yeah, try not to over-think it, there are a bunch of way to do the same thing. Worst case you can always cut off and re-do sometime down the road. I did that with a plow mount once. ..and even on my Jeep, once I bought the lighter Western blade, I cut the lower mount off and moved it a little to where I wanted it. If you have the right tools it isn't that hard to do.

    It would be a good idea to reduce twisting motion on the front of the frame rails by welding a brace from the lower mount (where the plow arms attach), and bolt the other end somewhere further back on the main frame rails like the region above the axle. Those frame rails even though they are stamped tin ...are a heck of a lot stronger than you think they'd be. Sounds like you've got a good handle on things though.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017
    Mrfnhappy likes this.
  8. MLG

    MLG Senior Member
    from WI
    Messages: 187

    Is this plow setup a "conventional mount" style, or a uni-mount style where the pump and lights stay attached to the plow?

    Another thing you might consider as you are fabbing, especially if you drive this vehicle year round, is to make the lower mounting parts that typically hang below your vehicle, removable by removing some bolts. That way you don't have all that ugly stuff hanging down low all summer and you can reattach it in the fall when you need it.
     
    Mrfnhappy likes this.
  9. Mrfnhappy

    Mrfnhappy Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    I am considering removing as much as possible in the off season. And am using bolted components to make that possible. The unit is uni mount style.
     
  10. SIPLOWGUY

    SIPLOWGUY Senior Member
    Messages: 686

    I have an original Uni-Mount on my 01 Cherokee. I see mounts around, scour Craigslist.

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    Jeep RF.JPG