Winter 2021-22 salt

BossPlow2010

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
SE Michigan
Redi mix guys are giving me a hard time. Over all I’m hearing just don’t do it followed by laughs…. I’m not buying concrete so they done care…
a buddy works for DOT and he said the stuff they use is called Melt Down 20. He also said it’s extremely corrosive.
I have a quote for Sodium Chloride at $4.00 a bag. Site One just quoted me 9k for a truckload of Excalibur ice melt…
If you can avoid site one for salt, you should, they’re overpriced around here, so they’re probably overpriced there.

Salt can be very corrosive, when it’s mixed with water.
but salt in itself isn’t corrosive. NaCl combined with H2O
 

LubbockRoots

Junior Member
Location
Lubbock,TX
Just got someone to talk to me. Locally we have 5%-8% air entrained concrete for commercial lots. He is recommending selling a dencifier. Overall I was told commercial engineered parking lots should be fine. Residential (which I’m not doing) he said most contractors will cut costs to save a buck and pour the wrong material for the application….
Does that help at all?!?
 

Mark Oomkes

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids, MI
Just got someone to talk to me. Locally we have 5%-8% air entrained concrete for commercial lots. He is recommending selling a dencifier. Overall I was told commercial engineered parking lots should be fine. Residential (which I’m not doing) he said most contractors will cut costs to save a buck and pour the wrong material for the application….
Does that help at all?!?

I'll be honest, I have no idea what amount of air entrainment there is in the North.

What is a "dencifier"?

My guess is salt away using sodium chloride.

But, it wouldn't be a bad idea to add a damage disclaimer to your contract.
 

Freshwater

PlowSite Veteran

If you want the summary...sodium chloride does not physically or chemically harm concrete. Mag chloride is the worst, followed by calcium chloride as depending on the makeup, can chemically harm concrete.

Then to throw some for a loop...calcium is used in concrete in cold temps to speed curing.

Anyways, if I've said it once, I've said it 100 times. Properly formulated and properly installed concrete will not be damaged by salt. This is an indisputable fact. The problem comes in with either crappy redi-mix companies and/or crappy contractors who either don't order the correct product or screw up the installation. Even then, sodium chloride does cause spalling, freeze/thaw cycles cause spalling.

100's if not 1000's of miles of curbs, roads and bridges are built every year using concrete. Municipalities do not wait a year before applying sodium chloride to these roads and bridges. We have applied sodium chloride to 1 month old concrete parking lots, sidewalks, curbs, without any damage.

So @LubbockRoots , you need to more research. Ask the contractor why it will damage it? What does he recommend? Talk to some redi-mix companies and ask what they recommend? If you were further north the answers would be simple.
Thanks for posting the link. Ill read it when I have a few min. Curious, did they do any testing with asphalt?
 

Freshwater

PlowSite Veteran
So prices should go down if it follows the supply-demand curve???
Should.... it will be interesting to see how long it takes to break ground and get salt to market. Whatever larger company buys them out, will probably ration to keep the price up.

If anything might be a good investment opportunity.
 

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