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A brand spanking new small office building just opened up. We are referred by the local landscaper. We lock in our contract for plowing and salting. Owner expresses concern with new grass installed and possible damage. I reassured them we will install plenty of markers. 26 to be exact. Small lot, but lots of cut ins and funky layout. We,ve done one 10" storm and probably 4 small plow and ice storms. So I get a call today, saying they want to cancel services for this weekend. Potential big storm is coming though. I said I know your office is closed, but you cant just let it go. Extreme cold temps are following this storm and it may freeze solid. They explain they just dont want us to come this weekend only. My spidey senses are going off and I get real. I asked if they were unhappy with any part of our service. They had no complaints. If it's not the service, then it must be the price? They responded by saying they have always rented office space in the past and these costs were included. Now its extra and its adding up. I'm thinking , we havent had much snow this season.. But long story short, they found a cheaper guy they wanted to try out. TRY OUT? So I'm suppose to sit back and do nothing on this big storm coming.....on a more relaxed weekend time frame.....and leave my stakes in for someone else? So I ask you guys, what would YOU do at this point?
 

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Tell another customer you'll haul away the snow free of charge, then dump it on that customers property after the "new guy" is done plowing:rolleyes:



Back to reality...
If you have a contract I wouldn't accept this. I'd say something along the lines of your contract states you (contractor) have an obligation to clean the lot. I might even blame my insurance. If someone falls while you are under contract you could be liable.

My guess is you will not be getting the contract next year regardless. If they want you to bid it, only bid seasonal so they know their costs up front. If you don't want to fight it, and make them stick to their contractual agreements, I would at least pick up my stakes.

Perhaps breaking the contract on your end would be best at this point. Write an email (you want paper trails) stating you are voiding your contract. Fallow whatever your contract stages to cancel your contract. Maybe get a lawyer to assist you.

I personally would wipe my hands of these guys, but you need to do it legally. I for sure wouldn't leave my stakes down for another customer to use, break, or even steal.
 

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Tough pill to swallow but I would say good riddence. If this season was crazier they probably would have realized they couldn't afford you a long time ago. IMO Better to let them go and make room for serious clients that deserve your service and are willing to pay for it.

To protect yourself acknowledge their request for cancelation in writing. Either accept unconditionally or with conditions as set out in your contract. Or refuse the notice for whatever reason allowable by your contract and service the storm if your contract allows it.

Either way, when they call you back because they remember how you did such an amazing job and their new guy didn't show up - ball will be in your court.

J
 

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I would send an Email canceling the contract per the conversation. State all money owed is due now. And I would go get my stakes. Otherwise you're just helping the new guy.
You forgot.... flip a coin to determine if several pounds of roofing nails fell oot of the back of the truck.......
 

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I would make myself clear.
I’m in a position where I turn down work. If I’m doing your lot, I’ve made room for you, how would he feel if the shoe was on the other foot.
“ I know I have a contract to clear your snow but this other lot is offering me more money for this storm so I’m gonna do them instead of you. If it doesn’t work out I’ll come back for the storms after that”.
Come on, it sounds like elementary school kid negotiation....this person has never been exposed yet to the consequences of trust and mistrust.
 

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I'd....

….and pull my stakes! ;)

NYH1.
 

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I picked up a new residential account this fall. I know her, I spent many Saturday mornings watching cartoons with her son's. I grew up on the same block.
She never liked me, I was too boisterous and high energy.
Anyway, I know it's a complete PITA job. 50' of public walk, 6 steps up to another 15' of walk to the front door, 6 steps up to the door. Small 15" wide sidewalk around the side of the house to a pair of side doors, that are on a porch with 6 steps on the front and 6 on the back. Another 30' of 15" sidewalk to the garage, and about enough room to park 2 cars behind the garage. The properties ate so close the snow from behind the garage has to be blown into the neighbors back yard. He's ok with that.
We have 5.7" day one, 6.2" day two with 30-50 mph winds. 3 days later we get another 5+" with only 20mph wind.
She sent her check with a note saying "ive never paid this much for snow removal, I hope you get faster." Then she accused me of gouging the price.
I told her we did two months worth of snow removal in 3 days, the price per service reflects that. If you don't understand that there aren't enough crayons in the box to draw you a better picture. We don't work for people that don't appreciate us, this is your cancellation notice.
 

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Couple different ways to approach. Most already mentioned .If you do drop it, I would make sure I went out graciously,never burn a bridge.Thank them, explain what other services you offer and tell them if they get in a jam to give you a call. I lost a daycare center, new director said I was way more expensive than the other daycares being serviced by others ( I am!) and they were having other contractor do the lot.That lasted half a season and I was back doing it.Never take rejection personally,unless its a hotty,then its ok.
Oh and pull the stakes ,or relocate in strategic positions!
 

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Couple different ways to approach. Most already mentioned .If you do drop it, I would make sure I went out graciously,never burn a bridge.Thank them, explain what other services you offer and tell them if they get in a jam to give you a call. I lost a daycare center, new director said I was way more expensive than the other daycares being serviced by others ( I am!) and they were having other contractor do the lot.That lasted half a season and I was back doing it.Never take rejection personally,unless its a hotty,then its ok.
Oh and pull the stakes ,or relocate in strategic positions!
Agreed go out on the best terms possible. There not playing honestly. If the other guy plowing is a :terribletowel:they will call the OP back. or they will put up with him. I would not want them unless I could see future work. I would not keep them for snow and ice only. My last years in it I only plowed summer work clients and lost one after 14 years of snow and ice. Lost the snow over a salting issue. Still doing there summer work tho, this is why I agree.

I been thrown out for not letting a snow wizard run my business and spend my money. I could not go out humble, when he thought he could muscle me it was over. When I got the letter that they will not be able to use me because my safety methods where not up to there standards and would like to part ways was a beautiful thing.

Contractor friend has all the excavation work there and been doing it for years and bigger than me, class act, no work was coming my way the guy hated me because I did not kiss his, nevermind like the factory workers inside that hate him. Big load off my back getting away from him.
 
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