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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At 209,000 starter gave up the ghost. I keep one in stock (a used one) so in about 20 minutes I was up and running all over again.

Decided to rebuild the original one, because it's fun to do, and something I hadn't done previously. Fun, to me, is playing with tools, and getting to write it all off.:D

So, I disassembled the unit, and found that the brushes were done, the vent tube was non existent, and the solenoid contacts were a little toasty, but for the most part it was in good shape. Lots of brush material in there, but again, nothing crazy to repair.

Waited for parts to come in from the supplier, as the rebuild kit is sold out of FLA.

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Kit came in, and is inclusive of all parts that normally go bad when you disassemble the unit, plus they provide new bearings for the armature and solenoid plunger and contacts, spring, etc. All the parts get cleaned up, the bearings are removed and new ones installed, and the unit gets reassembled.

The majority of the time spent is cleaning the junk off of stuff. Once you do couple of these, the disassembly, and reassembly goes pretty quick.

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The armature should be cleaned thoroughly, including the polishing of the copper contact area the brushes are bumping against. A fine pick to clean out the grooves is helpful, as there is brush gunk embedded in between each raised ridge of the armature.

Some of the end cap bearings get stuck on there, but with doing a few of these, it's not that difficult to remove them.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Installing the armature through the brush holder can be a bit of a pain, but once you get it though, it's simply a process of reversing everything you did to take it apart.

Tested it before I installed it back in the truck, and it works as it should.

Ordered a second kit to rebuild my "spare". Waiting on that now.

Fun stuff rebuilding you own parts. Would have been way easier ordering a new one, and about the same in cost, but then I wouldn't have learned anything new.

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While I understand the want to rebuild parts but sometimes the time and cost don't warrant it for me. The wear to commutator will leave it with a much shorter life. Also the lack of warranty on a rebuilt compared to new/reman is always a deciding factor for me. Plus my cost on a new starter doesn't make it wise to rebuild one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
There was no appreciable difference between the contact area of the brushes, and the untouched sections of commutator . it simply was cleaned up and reused.

I had fun doing it. A brand new starter was $20 more than what I spent on rebuilding it, and I got to learn a few tricks in the process.

I agree a new warrantee unit is better. In no way it would be worthwhile to rebuild these for payment, as the time spent alone wiped out any profitability. I just liked doing it.
 

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Got to remember I get parts at a fraction of what most pay. Can see a step on commutator in the pics. Back in the old day when it was popular to have starters and alternators rebuilt the local guy would turn the commutators. Do still use him on occasion for rebuilding larger motors. Like a spinner motor that cost $300+ costs $100-150 to be rebuilt by this guy. But like I said I completely understand wanting to rebuild it. If nothing more than learning how it all goes together.
 
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