• SnowCare For Troops Expands To Include Healthcare Workers
    Project EverGreen expands its SnowCare for Troops program to help healthcare professionals. Volunteers from the snow and landscape industries can provide snow and ice removal services to nominated healthcare heroes. Click here to read more.

Snow plowing with skidsteer

Michael F

Senior Member
Location
Rochester, NY
I have two complexs of townhouses to plow(about 1/2 mile apart)total about 80 drives roads also get plowed. I was thinking of putting a skidsteer(753) there with an 7 or 8 foot blade on it. Average drive way is 2-3 cars wide and 2 cars deep, was very difficult to manuver trucks in there last year. How would the skidsteer do?
 

cat320

2000 Club Member
Location
stoneham,ma
I think that it would do great because of the manuverablity of them.Go with the 8' plow for max. snow removal a 753 should handle it.Or you could always put a snow thrower on it which would be very good if you get alot of snow where you are.
 

GeoffD

PlowSite.com Veteran
Well this year i am doing the same thing. The difference is i will have two skid steers at each condo project, one with a bucket and one with a blade. I let ya know how it works after the first storm, however i have heard its a winning combo.

Oh yea each condo project, 3 clusters 100 drives each, the drivers are bigger than what you have described though. Used to take one contractor 16 hours from start to finish.

Geoff
 

diggerman

Senior Member
Location
Ames
I have used a skidloader for years 1845a,b,c then last year a 90xt.I started plowing when I was 12 with a 1845 gas. Skidloaders work well,but on really heavy snow a bucket will work better than a blade,ours is a case snow bucket/light material,it works as well as a pusher.On most of the snow that are pushable a 8.5 to 9 ftr is not out of the question,but a 753 maybe a little light.If you use a bucket make sure your operator wears a seat belt because there is no give and your head will reach the windsheild.Also if you will be in one area make sure the bucket is also there so if the plow breaks they can keep plowing.We have also had the problem on days were there is a little ice underneath the loader when pushing on a slight incline will go sideways very fast and getting down against cars can be a problem.If the operator drives over to much wet snow he wcan also high center real easy and with out a bucket he will be stuck sitting on a big pad of snow spinning his tires.If you deside you like the skidloader for pushing snow make sure the next one you get has a two speed and you will really love it.
 

AK Snow

Junior Member
Related to this subject - any thoughts on using tire chains with a skid steer while plowing? I've just taken delivery of a Cat 236 skid steer and plan to do some snow work with it. Was a little reluctant to go with a Cat as they're pretty new to skid steers, but no one else in town was even close in price or interest rate so figured I'd give it a shot. I'm assuming running chains on it can only help me, but I'm wondering if there is a downside to using them that I haven't thought of.

Dave
 

paul

PlowSite.com Veteran
Location
Chicago, Il
We do one complexe that is 435 car parking area plus drives, we have one skid steer set up with a 10' pusher and one set up with a 7.5' blade. like the pusher for general clearing and the blade for tight work, keep the bucket handy for loading out snow or moving it on site. REMEMBER THE SEAT BELT, if that bucket hits a manhole or curb you can be thrown out of it or againts the windshield.
 

diggerman

Senior Member
Location
Ames
And if you do hit the windshield you may not break it but you'll be so mad that you might stick your fist through it.

Chains are really hard on the drives and drive chains,and with as much spinning as skid tires do asphalt will be getting chewed up as well as your chains, they will most likely not last long and they are pricey.
 
Top