removing v box sander

karl klein

Senior Member
Location
omaha,ne
i just bought a old 1976 chevy 2500 with a v box sander in the back and was wondering how i could remove it in my garage or driveway

please help!!!
 

CT18fireman

Banned
Location
Western CT
If you have strong rafters in your garage they may be able to support a sander. Otherwise use a tree. Get a come a long or chain hoist and use that to lift it off. I would then lower it onto some sawhorses or something solid and not just leave it hanging unless you add a good solid chain to hold it.
 

CT18fireman

Banned
Location
Western CT
What size are the joists?

I have a buddy who filled the space between two joists with wood blocking. Then wrapped a chain around the two and hung a chain hoist on it. He has 2x8 joists. It works fine for lifting the sander (they only weigh 700-800 lbs at the most for the average 8ft). He does not leave it hanging but instead just lifts it. Then he lowers it onto a carriage we built about 2ft off the ground and on wheels so he can roll it into the corner of the garage.

I am not an engineer so I cannot say this is ok for the joists or what they are rated for. I do know that the joist do not sag when he lifts it and has had no problems. Take this advice at your own risk.
 

GeoffD

PlowSite.com Veteran
Unless your garage is built stronger than the regular home garage, i wouldn't try to lift a v-box from the framming. I would suggest building an oversized swingset type thing. Then use a cheap 1/2 ton chain fall the lift the v-box.

Geoff
 

Pelican

2000 Club Member
I built a "gallows" using doubled up 2 x 6s for supports and doubled up 2x8s for the crossmember. Then I got a boat winch and pulleys from Northern hydraulics and 1/4 inch steel cable and crank the thing in and out. I set it on heavy saw horses for storage. If you take this route, make sure your crossmember is level for ease of install/remove.

My 8' Torwell is 980lbs.

A couple years ago I bought a jib boom for my skid steer and put the sander in and out with that now. Much easier.
 

Mick

PlowSite.com Veteran
Location
Maine
Karl, I've been trying to figure the same thing. I'd built a frame of uprights made of 3 2x6s nailed together and put a crossmember of 2 2x6s with wood spacers for a chain fall. When I started lifting the vbox, the crossmember started bending. I backed off and will get my neighbor and his front end loader to lift it off for me. I've got an old one ton I'll be storing it on. The other way I'm thinking about is using two 4x4s and jacks. Since it's sitting on a flat bed and they left the loading boards on it, I could run the 4x4s between the vbox and the truck bed, jack it up, drive out and let it down on saw horses.
 

RB

Senior Member
Whoever said they wouldn't recommend hanging it from the joists in the garage is good advice. I'm hanging my small airflo mss from the joists and when you move the spreader from the garage to position it on the bumper of the truck it makes a loud noice above the garage.

I think the swing set thing w/some kind of winch would work best.

PS
I'm in the process of makign a rolling frame for my airflo mss out of some 3/4" pipe and some heavy duty casters.
 

Mick

PlowSite.com Veteran
Location
Maine
Thanks, GeoffD. I'm just glad I didn't hang it from my joists like someone around here (not PS) recommended.
 

plowking35

2000 Club Member
Location
SE CT
You can hang it from joists if you use more than one. However he mentioned an I beam. A trolley mounted on the I beam with a chainfall should do the trick.
The trick with joists is to fasten more than one together, then use that as a beam. Either with joist hangers, or by sistering in another joist along side the current one. Also the span of the joist has alot to do with whether or not it can take the weight.
A header could also be built under the joists perpendicular to the joists, with 4x4's holding the header up. Wrap a chainfall around the header and lift away. Two 8' pieces of 9.5" micorlam would be more than enough to handle that. Fasten with the assembly with bolts, so that once you are done with it, it can be disassembled.
Dino
 

Ohiosnow

Senior Member
Location
Ohio
I-beams & joists

My Dad was a builder & even though their is a I-beam it wasn't figured in to be a lifting device. Yes it might work but if the garage has a I-beam I'll bet there is structure above it besides the roof. And as the same goes even more for the joist, even with adding extra joists & bracing it would not be the BEST solution.
It takes me back to when I was 16 helping a friend and him & his dad were lifting out a engine-trany off the ceiling joist (with 6' bars streaching over 4 joists) everything was going fine at first then we heard a crack we all ran out the door & looked back as the whole center of the garage collapsed. :( :( So it might work but it might not :eek: :eek:
Where are you located ,anywhere in NE Ohio, I own a 38' boom hoist truck. Brent
 

CT18fireman

Banned
Location
Western CT
To clarify. I did not recommend it. Only said that I had seen it done. This guy is a builder so I would assume he knew the strength of the studs. As I said and Dino restated the key I think was that he sistered studs (2x8 or 2x10) together with blocking and wrapped the chain around all of them. Also the joists have a short span 10-12ft? because of a beam and posts and do not support anything above. Again I am not an engineer but I have seen him lift many things over 1,000 lbs without any problems.

Not saying to do this. The average home may not support it. When I moved into my shop which is an old barn we built a whole support for I-beams and a trolley hoist. Now I have a skid steer that we use more often but the hoist is still there and works great. Although it is steel beam the whole thing is still supported by the frame of the barn. With what we removed, in weight, out of the loft of the barn I think the hoist will be fine.
 

Pelican

2000 Club Member
If your going to use a ceiling joist, it should be 2x6 mininum, then you should screw an additional 2x6 to each side of the one you are going to lift on. Then put a support column on each end as close to the truck as possible, this could be a 4x4, but 6x6 would be better. You should put cats between your pulling joist and the two joists adjacent to it to prevent flexing and horizontal movement.

A 4x4 should not be used as your lifting point, this has even less strength than 2 2x4s nailed together, and if there is a large knot in the post, it will almost surely fail. No matter what you do, don't go under the sander while it is suspended.

Just wanted to add: If you have any doubt about the strength of your structure, ask a qualified carpenter to look at it first. You've allready heard here of what can happen if it's not done correctly.
 
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CT18fireman

Banned
Location
Western CT
A good point. We never leave any sanders anywhere hanging. We alway lower them onto supports. Heavy duty sawhorses or pallets stacked are a good choice just keep it low to the ground if possible. Just a measure of safety.
 

cat320

2000 Club Member
Location
stoneham,ma
If you don't have a garage with beams to support it or a loader than I would go to the iron yard and get a good size steel beam and support it at leat 12'-14' from the ground and put a slidding hoist on it with a good chainfall.a freind of ours has one like it for his sander and it looks pretty good.I wish I had a picture to show you.If you have the space very god way to go
 

plowking35

2000 Club Member
Location
SE CT
Never use screws in a structual situation to hold item together. They dont have the shear strength needed for vertical loads. Either use bolts, lags or nails. If you need clamping as well as holding strength, then lags and bolts are your best bet.
Dino
 

carlriv2

Senior Member
Location
Mass
This is the first time I tried the picture thing.

This is what I use to lift the vbox off the truck. I can easily move this to anywhere I want.

sander hoist.jpg
 
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