Problem Installing Plow

pcs

Senior Member
I dropped my truck off this morning to get my new 8 1/2 Boss V installed. Got a call at about 12:00 asking if I new my truck had a plow on it before which I did. It was a demo and the Ford dealer used it on there lot last year. Anyway it turns out that the bumper plates have cracks in them. I think that's what it is. The plow dealer was on the phone to Ford engineering dept. all day trying to find out if there is a special procedure to fix the problem.

It's now going to be at least 2 full days without my truck which is costing me a lot of money because I'm going to be 2 days behind with my cutting and it's suppose to rain the rest of the week. What a mess!!!

Has anyone heard of this happening before? It's a 2001 F-350.
 

75

PlowSite.com Addict
Don't have any answers specific to your truck, but a couple of ideas come to mind:

Bolts not torqued properly in the previous installation, or an improper installation. (I don't know if this is part of the mounting kit on your plow, but I try whenever possible to use a backing plate when bolting something to a frame. This acts as a big washer and distributes the stress over a wider area.)

Abuse by the previous operator. You mention that it was used by a dealer to plow their lot - I can envision it now: "You, flunky. Go plow the lot." Start engine. Rev cold engine to redline. Throw it into gear. Scraaaape.............BASH! :eek: Throw it into reverse. Floor pedal. Slam on brakes. Throw it into gear. Scraaaape..............BASH! :eek: (Well, you get the idea)
 
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pcs

Senior Member
75 - That's what I think also. They put someone in the truck that didn't plow before and slamed into curbs and thought it was fun. I got the Truck up in Barrie and they will be getting a phone call from me tomorrow.
 

mdb landscaping

Senior Member
Location
Glastonbury, CT
it wouldnt look professional, but you could always rent a uhaul pick up. i know around here ive seen some newer style chevy 1500 uhaul trucks. i dont know what you are towing for weight, but maybe this could solve your need for a truck
 
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pcs

Senior Member
I'm not sure what the exact proedure is but I'll find out when I talk to them tomorrow and let you know. I was down there this afternoon and I saw them welding something.
 

GeoffD

PlowSite.com Veteran
Thats Biz, sometimes ya have a bump in the road, and nothing you can do about it. We lost some serios money last week, when some materials didn't arrive on time, and we had to open the road twice.,

Geoff
 

75

PlowSite.com Addict
Thanks pcs - mostly, I'm just curious. At a guess, I would say they either had to gouge ("vee") out the cracks and weld them, or a plate (often called a "fishplate" or "doubler" plate) was installed in the cracked area.
 

75

PlowSite.com Addict
Done properly, the repair will be equal or greater strength than the original.

GeoffD - you're right about "bumps in the road". I work for a welding company, same thing applies. Some jobs you make money on, others you just want to get 'em over with & move on to the next one because any profit was used up long ago!
 

CT18fireman

Banned
Location
Western CT
Not sure what plow was on it before but I know that many manufacturers especially (Meyer and Diamond) use the bolts where the tow hooks and bumper mount as an attaching point. Now the damage could have been done from various things. My bet would be that the bolts loosened and were not checked but the dealer. I would be weary of buying a truck like that but if they gave you a deal it is worth it. I would think if it ends up costing you a lot then you should go back to the dealer and complain a little. The squeaky wheel gets the grease.
Checking for loose bolts is part of regular maintenance for me. Especially the first year the plow is installed. Bolts have a way of loosening. Usually in the middle of the big storm.
 
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pcs

Senior Member
It was a Meyers plow on it before. That's the only reason I got the truck was because I got a good deal on it. They wanted to give me the plow for cheap too but I passed on the Meyers.
 

ddm

Member
Location
Michigan
I had that problem CT18... is describing where the tow hooks bolt to the frame on an old truck of mine. I'm not clear on if this is exactly whats up with your F-350, but in my case it was a Chevy 8600GVW and I seemed to just tear the frame apart at that point with a Western uni-mount plow. I don't think the bolts came loose per say, but that truck moved a lot of snow and I kind of blamed it on metal fatique over time at that point. I'm not sure that's really the best design to bolt on there, but I guess it works.

Anyway, a local welding shop re did it for me similiar to what has been described here with a weld and heavy backing plates. It held up well for me another year and half with no problems, so I don't think I'd worry about the repair. What I would be concerned about is how it's going to effect the value when you go back to the same Ford dealer and want to trade it in. IF you got a good enough deal to begin with maybe not so bad.
 

CT18fireman

Banned
Location
Western CT
The meyer mount on the Ford hangs right off those tow hook mountings. Possibly not the best place to hang the plow as I imagine it leverages a lot when the plow is lifted etc. This is the are where spending money on a better frame like a Fisher will save you in the long run. The Fisher bolts along the frame rail and has more mounting points.
 

75

PlowSite.com Addict
You're right about the "leverage" CT18, another contributing factor to frame damage is bolting stuff on without a backing plate.

For example, four bolts with washers attaching a plow mount to the frame will concentrate the stress around the holes, leading to cracks. A backing plate (in effect "sandwiching" the frame) will distribute the stress over a wider area.

And yes, a better design frame like Fisher's is worth the $$$.
 

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