Plowing with Medium Duty vs. Pick-up

CK82

Senior Member
Location
Madison, WI
Hello All,

I was looking for some feedback in regards to efficiency of plowing with a medium duty vs. a pick-up. We run multiple pick-ups with V plows & expandables, some of which with V box salters in the back. We also run a medium duty with an 11 bed, expandable plow, and larger 5-6 yard V box salter. The medium duty's just seem cumbersome, even one ton dually's.

Just looking for some feedback on what you guys prefer, and what an ideal setup would be for commercial plowing.

On a side note we also run a small/mid sized wheel loader with a Metal Pless live edge, and a Kubota M7060 with a Metal Pless live edge. I definitely realize those are our money makers, however they sit all summer unused.
 

Kvston

Senior Member
No knowledge yet on medium duty, but we do operate SRW and DRW trucks. IMO a lot depends on client lot layouts. We have lots that you couldn't get a dually on some of it-too narrow. Other lots see the benefit of wider plows and bigger weight for pushing.

That being said, we do plan to integrate a 5500 class truck into the fleet to take advantage of 8.5-11' expandable plows and the summer towing benefit.
 

rizzoa13

Senior Member
We have 5 of the 7500 or larger trucks and 3 pickups in the current fleet. There’s no comparison in efficiency between them. The big trucks hold much more salt, lay down more salt when needed (being hydro), and move larger piles of snow with ease.

There is a huge difference in maneuverability between the larger trucks so make sure you look for something with the highest wheel cut you can find. The big truck with the right setup will give you better visibility being higher up and much better turning ability than any pickup out there.

Get ready for a lot more maintenance and MUCH higher repair bills when something goes down.
 

Mark13

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
Snowless IL.
I've had 2 different pickups setup with plows over a 9yr span and for the last 4-5 years had an F550. Hands down I'd take the 550 over the 3/4ton pickup even running the same plow and the same 2yd spreader. It turns tighter, handles the weight without issue, pushes far better, and is all around a much better platform for the job then the 3/4ton pickup was.
In the attached picture the truck was in 2wd, you're not doing that with a normal pickup in 2wd, maybe 4x4 if you're loaded heavy but it would still be working hard.
plow 2.jpg
 

rizzoa13

Senior Member
To clarify are you talking something like a 550 which is pretty much a beefed up pickup or a medium duty as in class 7 and 8 single axle dumps?
 

LapeerLandscape

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
lapeer, mi
This really depends on a few things. The size/shape of lots your doing being the main thing. They can range from residential, Dr offices, restaurants, furniture stores, tractor supply, manufacturer plants to the big box store. Then it depends if you want your plowing trucks separate from your salt trucks.
 

Ajlawn1

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
South Bend, IN
This really depends on a few things. The size/shape of lots your doing being the main thing. They can range from residential, Dr offices, restaurants, furniture stores, tractor supply, manufacturer plants to the big box store. Then it depends if you want your plowing trucks separate from your salt trucks.

Agree. Unless it's a big open Wally world gimme a 3/4 ton...
 

LapeerLandscape

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
lapeer, mi
The question is which vehicle can you do your full range of lots faster with. Bottom line is even with the blades we have today you can only carry so much snow until it spills over the sides.
I would also say it's 80% or more operator.
 
Last edited:

bluejlandscaper

Senior Member
I prefer the F-550 over a 3/4 or 1 ton pickup any day. I can push more snow with my F-550 and 9' Western blade
My new F-550 will get the new Western wideout 8'6" to 11'. That will make an awesome plowing rig.
The only machine that I like better for plowing is my Cat 906M with the 10-15 HLA wing blade.
 

Ice-sage

Senior Member
Location
Icy trail
To the original poster CK82, when you tell us you are looking for a much more manuverable not so large a vehicle, and then say "commercial use" in the same breath, it leaves us guessing exactly what kind of actual use the machine may be used for. You did say though that you would like to figure out and make use of the machine in the warmer/summer months.

We tried Hino cab-overs and have not looked back since. The Hinos have done everything we have asked of them and more. Winter or summer has not held us back. Plowing, salting, liquid, towing, winching, flatbedding other machines and vehicles. Once we figured out a switch-n-go type system, the floodgates opened and a whole other world flashed for us to be able to do even more things and provide more services to offer and keep the flow of dough running 365 days a year with the Hinos.

Take a look.




A neat switch system video.


And for the price of these machines, they are right in the ballpark. They are made to work. Semi creature comforts and they just work.
 

Mark Oomkes

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids, MI
Never thought of a won ton as a medium duty, but the wikipedia says I'm wrong.

Table of US GVWR classifications
US truck classDuty classificationWeight limit [1][7]Examples
Class 1Light truck0–6,000 pounds (0–2,722 kg)Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon, Ford Ranger, Honda Ridgeline FWD[8], Jeep Gladiator, Nissan Frontier, Toyota Tacoma
Class 2aLight truck6,001–8,500 pounds (2,722–3,856 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 1500, Ford F-150, Honda Ridgeline AWD[8][9][10], Lexus GX, Lexus LX, Nissan Titan, Ram 1500, Toyota Tundra
Class 2bLight/Medium truck8,501–10,000 pounds (3,856–4,536 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 2500, Ford F-250, Nissan Titan XD, Ram 2500[8][9][10]
Class 3Medium truck10,001–14,000 pounds (4,536–6,350 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 3500, Ford F-350, Ford F-450 (pickup only), Ram 3500
Isuzu NPR[11]
Class 4Medium truck14,001–16,000 pounds (6,351–7,257 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 4500HD/International CV, Ford F-450 (chassis cab), Ram 4500[8]
Isuzu NPR-HD,[11]
Class 5Medium truck16,001–19,500 pounds (7,258–8,845 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 5500HD/International CV, Ford F-550, Ram 5500
Isuzu NRR,[11] Freightliner Business Class M2 106, Kenworth T170, Peterbilt 325
Class 6Medium truck19,501–26,000 pounds (8,846–11,793 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 6500HD/International CV, Ford F-650, Freightliner Business Class M2 106, International MV[12], Kenworth T270, Peterbilt 330
Class 7Heavy truck26,001–33,000 pounds (11,794–14,969 kg)Autocar ACMD,[13] Freightliner Business Class M2 106, Ford F-750[14], Hino 338, International MV, Kenworth K370, Kenworth T370 and T440/470, Mack MD, Peterbilt 220 and 337/348
Class 8Heavy truck33,001 pounds (14,969 kg) and aboveAutocar ACX and DC; Freightliner Cascadia, Business Class M2 112, 118SD, and EconicSD; Ford F-750; Hino XL8; International LT, HV, and RH; Kenworth T680, T880, and W990; Mack Anthem, Granite, Pinnacle, and TerraPro; Peterbilt 389,[15] 579, and 520; Western Star 4800, 4900 and 5700

F750 and larger single axles are what I think of as a medium duty

What the heck do you consider heavy duty?
 

Mark Oomkes

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids, MI
Get ready for a lot more maintenance and MUCH higher repair bills when something goes down.

As Aj mentioned, I don't find this to be necessarily true. Randall won't either.

I had all 4 brakes on my Sterling done a couple years ago, price was around $2,200. The rears on my F800 done a few years before that were $5k. 35K GVWR vs 26K GVWR.

22.5 tires last far longer than 19.5s.

An alternator for my Sterling is $168 and wide open access, less than an hour to remove and replace. Try that on a 550 or 5500, or for that cheap.

Sure major engine or transmission repairs might be more expensive price wise, but not necessarily more cost wise.

A class 7 or 8 truck will outlast a 4 or 5 because of the heavier components all the way around.
 

Hydromaster

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
406
Never thought of a won ton as a medium duty, but the wikipedia says I'm wrong.

Table of US GVWR classifications
US truck classDuty classificationWeight limit [1][7]Examples
Class 1Light truck0–6,000 pounds (0–2,722 kg)Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon, Ford Ranger, Honda Ridgeline FWD[8], Jeep Gladiator, Nissan Frontier, Toyota Tacoma
Class 2aLight truck6,001–8,500 pounds (2,722–3,856 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 1500, Ford F-150, Honda Ridgeline AWD[8][9][10], Lexus GX, Lexus LX, Nissan Titan, Ram 1500, Toyota Tundra
Class 2bLight/Medium truck8,501–10,000 pounds (3,856–4,536 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 2500, Ford F-250, Nissan Titan XD, Ram 2500[8][9][10]
Class 3Medium truck10,001–14,000 pounds (4,536–6,350 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 3500, Ford F-350, Ford F-450 (pickup only), Ram 3500
Isuzu NPR[11]
Class 4Medium truck14,001–16,000 pounds (6,351–7,257 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 4500HD/International CV, Ford F-450 (chassis cab), Ram 4500[8]
Isuzu NPR-HD,[11]
Class 5Medium truck16,001–19,500 pounds (7,258–8,845 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 5500HD/International CV, Ford F-550, Ram 5500
Isuzu NRR,[11] Freightliner Business Class M2 106, Kenworth T170, Peterbilt 325
Class 6Medium truck19,501–26,000 pounds (8,846–11,793 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 6500HD/International CV, Ford F-650, Freightliner Business Class M2 106, International MV[12], Kenworth T270, Peterbilt 330
Class 7Heavy truck26,001–33,000 pounds (11,794–14,969 kg)Autocar ACMD,[13] Freightliner Business Class M2 106, Ford F-750[14], Hino 338, International MV, Kenworth K370, Kenworth T370 and T440/470, Mack MD, Peterbilt 220 and 337/348
Class 8Heavy truck33,001 pounds (14,969 kg) and aboveAutocar ACX and DC; Freightliner Cascadia, Business Class M2 112, 118SD, and EconicSD; Ford F-750; Hino XL8; International LT, HV, and RH; Kenworth T680, T880, and W990; Mack Anthem, Granite, Pinnacle, and TerraPro; Peterbilt 389,[15] 579, and 520; Western Star 4800, 4900 and 5700



What the heck do you consider heavy duty?

A trojan loader?
 

Mark Oomkes

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids, MI
As the others have said, totally depends on lot layout.

But in all reality (and it will never happen completely) I am trying to get out of plowing with trucks and move to equipment for plowing and trucks for cleaning up and/or salting. The equipment is so much more efficient.

Anyways, we plow with 2500s, 5500s, a 750 and sometimes the Sterling. Both 5500's have Boss V's and salt spreaders. The 750 and Sterling have 10' straight blades, the Sterling also has an underbody scraper.

If the lots can't be plowed in some sort of circle, the smaller trucks are faster. But, in heavier events, the larger trucks will always outplow a smaller truck...as others have noted.
 

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