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We came out from the Adirondacks to help out in Boston. Not sure it was fun but it was a memorable experience! Be safe out there boys and good luck with the cleanup.
 

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Hopefully some white at end of tunnel. Just changed all fluids in tranny, front and rear difs, and plow fluids so not expecting to see a flake stick to ground now....


There are 3 major patterns that are driving our weather for the next month or so.

La Nina - This will keep weather patterns over the southern states warmer than usual. Any storm that taps the air/moisture from the south will likely come as rain. However, this pattern has been going nearly 3 years now and is showing signs of weakening which could cause an ocean temp reversal in the Pacific. If this happens, expect more storms in the southwest and more warm air pumped into the middle of the country. Right now, it is keeping the southwest quiet allowing gulf storms to bring in moisture and cold flows from the northwest to bring in fronts that have created havoc over the southeast.

North Atlantic Oscillation - The high over Greenland will tend to stall or trap anything coming into the New England area. So, if you have a storm, it will tend to hang around. Similarly, if the cold comes in, it will take a lot to move it out. This could set up for massive snowstorms if the right combination lines up. Yesterday's clouds and today's rain normally would have blown through fairly quick, but the Greenland High slows the progress and we see a much longer duration of weather.

Polar Vortex - Right now, the jet stream wants to dip low which is bringing cold air further south than normal. Parts of Texas are seeing significantly lower temps than normal as a result. If this continues, it could overcome the weakening La Nina pattern and allow cold storms to arrive here in the Northeast.

The end result is a wave of storms across the south, some significant. Depending on if the Polar Vortex retreats north, or the La Nina pattern fades, will determine if those storms reach us as cold or warm. Either way, so long as the Greenland High stays, whatever comes will be slow in arriving and stick around for a while when it comes.

All in all, we are probably a bit above average in seeing a White Christmas. If the La Nina does weaken and everything else remains stable, early next year could see some significant snow here. If the La Nina maintains dominance, we are more likely to see the warmth come with the storms and result in more rain. The problem is, the models are terrible in predicting the La Nina and El Nino cycles. We've only really begin to understand these effects in the past decade or so, so there is little historic data to drive the models. As a result, the predictions are based on what happens rather than what is expected.

Either way, we can expect to see a variety of weather. In other words, typical New England.
 
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