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When it comes to snow and ice equipment, there's always something new coming out in the industry. For some, new doesn't always mean better, but change is inevitable.

That's the dynamic manufacturers and end users find themselves in for several snow and ice management products, including the emergence of electric-powered spreaders.

"I think the main thing is inertia. People are used to gas," said Scott Moorman, Director of Engineering for Buyers Products Co., a plow and spreader manufacturer based in Mentor, Ohio. "Because of the early changes with the use of electric, I feel some people are hesitant from the past."


Some managers have shied from using electric spreaders due the misconception that they lack power. Although a gas motor holds more horsepower than electric (10.5 hp vs. 3.25 hp), Moorman believes electric is much more effective.

"People see that and think 'How does that even work?'" Moorman said. "(With a 3.25-hp electric motor), it's pulling 90 amps from the truck battery, and that's a lot over a protracted period of time. With the electric, you get this full torque at zero speed. In a gas engine, you can't do that. With the electric, you get all the torque all the time, so it's much more efficient for what you're doing."

Moorman ceded that gas spreaders don't need to use a truck battery but with a properly maintained vehicle, an electric device won't have trouble with a charging system.

"The nice thing is that it only draws a current when it needs it. It can draw 100 amps," he said. "If you're just cruising down the street with your spreader, you are only pulling 30 amps and that's not extreme." Opting for an electric spreader could provide a savings on fuel costs and offer less noise pollution if working with residential accounts. Plus, the technology is constantly advancing with manufacturers moving toward wireless operation.


Generally, the industry is catching up to the prospect of dealing in electric.

"You see this learning curve. It has been painful and there have been lessons learned. You're talking about a lot of high-current DC controllers, not an off the shelf thing," Moorman said. "Everyone worked with their vendors, and we stumbled along until the controllers were whipped into shape to get a pretty mature product now."

Despite its simple "plug and go" advantages, the electric spreader does not spell the end of the gas spreader; but Moorman said the writing is on the wall.
"It's asked every year. 'Is this the end of gas spreaders?' I don't know if it ever will be," Moorman said. "Some may choose gas as a preference, but the future is electric."
 

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So they make electric spreaders now? Did this "Scott" guy invent that? How long does the extension cord running from the house have to be?


I dont know how it is elsewhere, but I can't give gas engine spreaders away anymore. I have a gas 4.5yd unit for $1200 less than the same brand electric and still no one will buy it
 

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So they make electric spreaders now? Did this "Scott" guy invent that? How long does the extension cord running from the house have to be?

I dont know how it is elsewhere, but I can't give gas engine spreaders away anymore. I have a gas 4.5yd unit for $1200 less than the same brand electric and still no one will buy it
Sounds like the only thing behind is his assessment of times are changing...

I might be the only one heck who knows, but actually had all big three in service this year, Tornados, Boss VBX and a Salt Mutt... After running Icebreakers would never go back to gas...
 

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This statement below is pretty good up the "pretty mature product" comment. The controllers and modules still have room for improvement, a good place to start is use better components, increase the quality criteria and build in USA.

"You see this learning curve. It has been painful and there have been lessons learned. You're talking about a lot of high-current DC controllers, not an off the shelf thing," Moorman said. "Everyone worked with their vendors, and we stumbled along until the controllers were whipped into shape to get a pretty mature product now."
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What is the issues that you had with the gas spreaders/ what is the reason that you would never run one?

That is all I ever ran and I would have a tough time finding something to complain about with them. :confused:
Especially since you can swap a clutch in 15 minutes one handed.
 

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What is the issues that you had with the gas spreaders/ what is the reason that you would never run one?

That is all I ever ran and I would have a tough time finding something to complain about with them. :confused:
I would say the main issue always seemed to be corrosion on the engine. Throttle/choke linkage especially, but I also run into this same problem on my side walk machines too...

Obviously making sure they are running before leaving... A lot of my stuff, trucks could be out plowing for hours before actually salting so best to leave it run...

I think it's more of a convenience factor if anything. Guy in a truck might not have a clue on getting it running if it won't start again etc... Plus maybe carrying an extra gallon of gas along with you...

You have pwr cables running to your batteries anyway or an extra external battery...

I would say in general just an overall more dummy proof setup with electric...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
and anyway, was that me or Jarrett that could do that? :confused:
I thought it was a team effort

Edit: Apparently you take 15 minutes to swap a motor. Jarrett was 5 minutes to swap a clutch. No word on how many hands were required.

https://www.plowsite.com/threads/random-thoughts-and-stories-thread.163154/page-709#post-2267931

https://www.plowsite.com/threads/random-thoughts-and-stories-thread.163154/page-710#post-2267944
What do I know..
 

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I would say the main issue always seemed to be corrosion on the engine. Throttle/choke linkage especially, but I also run into this same problem on my side walk machines too...

Obviously making sure they are running before leaving... A lot of my stuff, trucks could be out plowing for hours before actually salting so best to leave it run...

I think it's more of a convenience factor if anything. Guy in a truck might not have a clue on getting it running if it won't start again etc... Plus maybe carrying an extra gallon of gas along with you...

You have pwr cables running to your batteries anyway or an extra external battery...

I would say in general just an overall more dummy proof setup with electric...
I would agree if it didn't have modules and variable voltage controllers and what not. Seems like the build that type of garbage just to fail.

12v on/off I would not have a problem with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have a question...have they figured how absolutely asinine it is to solder a fuse into their controller???

Because if electric is truly the future, someone needs to get their cranial rectal inversion corrected on that issue.
 

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I have a question...have they figured how absolutely asinine it is to solder a fuse into their controller???

Because if electric is truly the future, someone needs to get their cranial rectal inversion corrected on that issue.
I think that was one of those "lessons learned" during that "learning curve."

If only someone had known before then that fuses blow...

Forehead Nose Hair Chin Eyebrow
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think that was one of those "lessons learned" during that "learning curve."

If only someone had known before then that fuses blow...
Might as well weld your oil filter onto the housing. Wheels to the hub.

I'm sorry, but that's got to be just about the dumbest thing I've seen...and living in Meatchicken, that's saying something.
 

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Might as well weld your oil filter onto the housing. Wheels to the hub.

I'm sorry, but that's got to be just about the dumbest thing I've seen...and living in Meatchicken, that's saying something.
Well, in their defense, they did put a little sticker on the box that says "No user serviceable parts inside" so you weren't supposed to know...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well, in their defense, they did put a little sticker on the box that says "No user serviceable parts inside" so you weren't supposed to know...
Not sure I would attempt to defend something so utterly asinine.
 
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