How to pick a snowblower for CAT 262D?

jpdex48130

Junior Member
Location
Michigan
Hi everyone,

I would really appreciate your guys input on this, especially if you've been in the snowblowing business for a long time.

I'm looking to fit up a 262D with a snow blower, but having a hard time understanding the pros and cons of all the different features/designs that are available. All the manufacturers have videos that explain their differences, but I can't find anything that really explains the pros and cons of different designs.

Here are some things I'd love some input on:

1. Serrated auger - some companies have a serrated auger on their snow blowers, and some don't... does this actually make a difference? Does it depend on the type of snow? I don't want to spend an extra $1k if this won't make a big difference

2. Snow sticking in the chute - does anyone have a good solution for snow getting stuck in the chute or the head? I've seen poly-lined chutes and other chute designs, but it seems like this is a universal problem... does anyone have an optimal design for this?

3. Head design - Snow Wolf and Snoquip both have designs where the head is "open"... there aren't sides on the head... does this make any sort of difference?

4. Cutting edges and skid shoes - so many options out there... metal, angled, poly, rubber... I don't understand how to choose.

Would really appreciate your guys help on this
 

seville009

PlowSite.com Addict
Location
CNY
I have a Erskine 2000 blower on an ASV PT-50.

The Erskine has a non-serrated auger, closed head, metal cutting edge, and built in metal skid shoes as part of the frame.

I don’t think a serrated auger adds much; I’ve never had a problem grinding up piles, etc.

Never used a blower with an open head, but my guess is you’d have more side spill off. Having it closed is nice for slicing into piles when blowing them back.

The metal cutting edge is great for peeling ice off asphalt. On the flip side, it slices up sod/grass just as easy too if you’re not careful. Adjustable shoes would be nice to alleviate that issue (mine are not). I would use metal shoes just for longevity



I’ve tried everything to keep the chute from clogging. Bottom line is that, other that repainting it each year to help keep it smooth, nothing works. Just have to keep the rpm’s up and go slow in heavier stuff. I keep a short pry bar in the cab to chop up any clogs.
 
OP
J

jpdex48130

Junior Member
Location
Michigan
I have a Erskine 2000 blower on an ASV PT-50.

The Erskine has a non-serrated auger, closed head, metal cutting edge, and built in metal skid shoes as part of the frame.

I don’t think a serrated auger adds much; I’ve never had a problem grinding up piles, etc.

Never used a blower with an open head, but my guess is you’d have more side spill off. Having it closed is nice for slicing into piles when blowing them back.

The metal cutting edge is great for peeling ice off asphalt. On the flip side, it slices up sod/grass just as easy too if you’re not careful. Adjustable shoes would be nice to alleviate that issue (mine are not). I would use metal shoes just for longevity



I’ve tried everything to keep the chute from clogging. Bottom line is that, other that repainting it each year to help keep it smooth, nothing works. Just have to keep the rpm’s up and go slow in heavier stuff. I keep a short pry bar in the cab to chop up any clogs.
Thanks, really appreciate the response! What do you recommend regarding steel/polyurethane cutting edges? In your experience, is a polyurethane edge as aggressive as steel? Is it likely to do less damage to asphalt and concrete?
 

seville009

PlowSite.com Addict
Location
CNY
Have no experience with a polyurethane edge, although they’re supposedly pretty good and less prone to marking up fancy driveways.

The steel edge I have came with the blower (bought it new). I can scrape off ice and hardpack with it great. Doesn’t peel up the asphalt; just a little scraping markings, but it’s just a driveway
 

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