Guess what? More Snoway questions

oldmankent

PlowSite.com Addict
this probably is a question for everyone. I bought a used snoway, and I've been trying to get it operational in my free time. I debolted the subframe and ground off all the rust and chipping paint, and repainted it. It looks good now, but who knows how long the paint will stay on. anyway, today, after it stopped raining, I tried to drain the hydraulic fluid. In the directions it says to disconnect the hoses to the angle and up down pistons. I disconnected the angle piston hoses and tried to move them manually to get all the hydraulic fluid out, but I couldn't move the things. I'm afraid that they might be frozen in place, as the plow hasn't been used in at least three years. I was hoping to get this thing operational on my own, but the more I do the more I want to take it to the dealer and let them deal with the thing. Does anyone have any ideas on how to free up the pistons? Maybe I should fill the pump back up and try to break them free with the pump pressure? thanks, Nick

Merry Christmas everyone.
 
Did it angle before you tried to flush it ? Try reconnecting them and operating the plow for a bit to loosen them up.Also,did you maybe overtorque the centre pivot bolt when you had it all apart for painting ?

Our snoways have been pretty much trouble free,except for some poor weld quality and a few sticky valves.
 
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oldmankent

PlowSite.com Addict
wyldman, I haven't run any of the wire harnesses through my truck yet. I can't let this thing eat up all my time;) so, no I did not try to operate it before I drained the fluid. I only took apart and painted the subframe that bolts to the truck. I took the pivot nut off the pivot pin because I thought the pin might be rusted up, but I don't think that is it. the center up down piston moves when I push the light bar back and forth. But, I can't get the angle pistons to budge. I really don't want to operate the pump that has 3 year old fluid in it. I may try removing the angle pistons and leaning on them to get them to move.:confused: thanks for reply, merry christmas, Nick
 

Alan

PlowSite.com Addict
I tend to be big on brute force for some things. I'd get the plow mounted, leave the hoses unhooked and put one end and then the other agasint a tree and stuff the cylinders in. My bet is that the pushrods are stuck in the seals, no damage done. Then again, I would have got it mounted and wired and made sure it operated first. I don't think I would be worried about running the pump with the old fluid in it, at least not enough to make sure it works. The procedure for draining the reservoir requires that you remove the pump mounting base from the plow to remove the reservoir cannister. That lets you get at the intake screen to inspect and clean that.
 

Pelican

2000 Club Member
You could try backing off the seals on the end of the pistons. You should see either two flats or a hex nut on the end of the cylinder where the piston goes in. Turn this counterclockwise a bit and see if it helps. Sometimes the seals are too tight to work manually.
 

plowking35

2000 Club Member
Location
SE CT
Alan
I was going to suggest the same thing, but didnt want to seem like a Rambo. Now I see I am more like Rambo Jr. With you being alot older and all.
Dino
 
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oldmankent

PlowSite.com Addict
I like the tree idea. Only thing is, I don't have any 3/16, 1/8, or 1/4 plate spacers and I'm short one of the 1/2 plate assembly nuts for the rear mounting brackets. thus, I can't mount the subframe. going to the dealer tomorrow and hopefully they'll have the parts. I can't wait to get this thing operating. Anyway, at the rate I"m going this thing will be ready to go first day of spring. Merry Christmas everyone. Nick
 

DaveO

PlowSite.com Veteran
Location
Ma.
Nick,

I would connect it up and try the hydraulics out first. Then I would flush it out. As for being concerned about the 3 year old fluid, you could drain the pump/resevoir assembly and refill with fresh fluid. ATF is cheap enough.

Dave
 
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