Fisher SD Or Boss HTX? Need Advice

Discussion in 'Residential Snow Removal' started by enigma869, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. cwren2472

    cwren2472 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,385

    Yes, all the HTX are full trip
     
  2. Kevin_NJ

    Kevin_NJ Senior Member
    Messages: 786

    The trip feature of plows are there to save the plow & truck when you hit an unseen obstacle. If you are only doing your driveway the likelihood of you doing so is low. The trip springs can be adjusted so more/less force is required to make the plow trip (full trip can at least; don't think edge trip can).

    Just to add more stuff for you to consider.... I know BOSS offers downforce, it uses the hydraulics to put more pressure down to aid in a cleaner swipe. This is valuable in the lighter weight 1/2 ton segments. With out that feature the weight of the plow alone is used. I know other mfg have similar tech, but not which ones or on which models.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    enigma869

    enigma869 Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    Thanks for muddying the waters, Kevin :) Just when I thought I had things figured out. On a serious note, I guess that I wasn't aware that Fisher didn't offer downforce. It sounds like it's actually functional, and not as much as a marketing gimmick that I originally thought it might be. Most of the comments I've read on this site make it sound like guys really loathe full trip plows. Now, I will only be doing my own two driveways, so it may never really come into play for me. That said, at some point, I may want to sell my truck and my plow, and I don't want my full trip plow to make that sale difficult. I guess I'm still up in the air between the Fisher and Boss HTX, so am still very open to other opinions. I appreciate all the great feedback, as it's helping with learning a great deal of stuff that is all new for me.

    John
     
  4. cwren2472

    cwren2472 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,385

    All the BOSS plows are a direct piston lift (no chain) which means that even without downforce, you can hold the blade locked rigid while scraping when it is not in float.

    The Fisher SD still uses a chain so it'll be gravity only for scraping on that one.

    Not to confuse matters more, but Fisher also offers the 7.5 HT which is a trip edge, direct piston lift model and would operate similar to the HTX in scraping. The HT still does not offer downforce, but I will say that the vast majority of my customers do not opt for downforce on the BOSS anyway.
     
  5. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 13,087

    Go kick the tires on each plow, see fir yourself
     
  6. cwren2472

    cwren2472 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,385

    It has no bearing on this discussion but for the sake of completeness I'll add that Boss trip edge plows are adjustable, Fisher (and I think most all other brands) are not. Not that I think I've ever had someone tell me they actually "adjusted" the tension on their trip edge.
     
    dieselss likes this.
  7. cwren2472

    cwren2472 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,385

    @enigma869 - ultimately, any plow you purchase will plow snow for 2 driveways. While I'm not saying it's wrong to do your research, I think @Kevin_NJ's point about the importance of a reputable, dependable dealer is a lot more critical than the specifics of a particular plow.

    Remember that while there are differences between the two models you are fretting over, both plows have thousands and thousands of people that manage to plow with them just fine. No matter which you go with, you are not going to be the first who can't plow his driveway because he chose the wrong one.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    enigma869

    enigma869 Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    Cwren...

    How does the Fisher HT compare to the SD? Both is price and functionality?
     
  9. cwren2472

    cwren2472 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,385

    I prefer the HT - the interwebs seem to prefer the SD.

    The HT is cheaper, usually by quite a bit, it can be outfitted with steel edge immediately, and it is a direct piston lift which can be locked while scraping or backblading.

    The SD is arguably "heavier duty", relatively speaking. It does have more steel, particularly in the mold board, and has a more traditional jack leg setup. It also tends to sit somewhat higher than the HT.

    I don't like chain lift for a light weight plow - even though the SD is heavier, no one would argue that it is heavy. I don't care for the poly edge - it is very, very expensive and sacrifices even more scraping than what you already lose with the chain lift. And for the applications that most people would use the 7.5' plow for, I don't think the extra durability is enough to compensate for the cons mentioned.

    But again, all this is just IMHO. And I don't use either, so take it with a grain of salt.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    enigma869

    enigma869 Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    Thanks for the feedback Cwren. I'll have to do a bit of research on the HT plow. Luckily, it's not quite July, so I still have some time to make a decision. My objective is to have a plow installed on my truck by September.
     
  11. seville009

    seville009 PlowSite.com Addict
    from CNY
    Messages: 1,420


    Good advice

    OP - In the end, any plow you choose will work fine.

    I have a dealer do the annual fluid change on my plow and have them check everything over. In the 16 years I’ve been plowing, I’ve only broken down once because of the plow (overheated cable - dealer fixed). Have had controllers die on me, but that’s kind of a wear item in my mind.

    Worst case if the plow fails is that you just pull out the old snowblower....
     
    cwren2472 likes this.
  12. NYH1

    NYH1 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,673

    I didn't read many of the replies in this thread.

    All I have to ad is, if you get a Fisher SD 7' 6" plow, I'd swap the poly cutting edge for the Fisher XLT 7' 6"x1/2" steel cutting edge.

    Good luck, NYH1.
     
    cwren2472 likes this.
  13. tdhbrtbone

    tdhbrtbone Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Have no experience with Fisher. However, my one year old Boss is a sweet unit and I highly recommend it. The down pressure option is a big plus. Also, you’ll probably want the 2” leveling kit for your truck’s front end.

    211BA7ED-297E-4874-8613-85429322DFAC.jpeg
     
    NYH1 likes this.
  14. OP
    OP
    enigma869

    enigma869 Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    Do I really need a leveling kit to plow my own two driveways (both driveways are on the same property)? I was hoping that if I went with a plow that is actually designed for a half ton pickup truck, that I wouldn't have to go down the road of further modifying my truck. I'm not a huge fan of modifying my truck. Hell, I'm not even much of a fan of putting a plow onto a Sierra Denali Crew Cab truck, but I'm done with the whole snowblowing thing!
     
  15. tdhbrtbone

    tdhbrtbone Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    You don’t need to for just those 2 driveways but with the leveling kit your front end won’t drop so drastically when lifting the plow. Plus it’ll look a lot better.
     
  16. OP
    OP
    enigma869

    enigma869 Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    So, quick follow up question on that. What does it typically cost to do the leveling kit? Also, do I have to go to my mechanic or dealer to have that done, or is that something that the Boss or Fisher (I still haven't decided upon which plow that I'm buying) dealer could do at the time the plow is being installed? My truck is still under warranty. I assume that a leveling kit wouldn't impact my warranty? I know that most manufacturers aren't fans of having vehicles modified in a way that they weren't designed for, so was just wondering about that.

    John
     
  17. cwren2472

    cwren2472 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,385

    You'd have to call the specific dealer to see if they will be suspension work - some will, some won't.

    But you likely don't need to modify the suspension at all. Put the plow on, see how it sits, then worry about it later if you aren't happy. There is no need to do it in advance.
     
    NYH1 likes this.
  18. OP
    OP
    enigma869

    enigma869 Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    Thank you for that advice, cwren. I doubt that I'll ever even drive my truck to the gas station with the plow attached to it. It's being purchased for the sole purpose of plowing my two driveways, so I'm trying to keep things simple.
     
  19. NYH1

    NYH1 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,673

    I didn't go with a leveling kit on my half ton with the Fisher SD. I did have Timbrens installed, had them installed on my 3/4 ton as well. Don't really know how much they helped because I had them installed with the plow.

    I think most leveling kits are kind of like spacers that go on top of the struts. I think you need to have your alignment checked/adjusted after installing them.

    Good luck, NYH1.
     
  20. tdhbrtbone

    tdhbrtbone Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Installed mine was 300.