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Experiences with Large Brooms

OP
Aerospace Eng

Aerospace Eng

2000 Club Member
Location
Zelienople, PA
Well, I was off by at 50%, and probably 100%. Here's an equipment list from the CLE Snow and Ice Control Plan (dated 2009), showing 15 brooms, 13 of which also have plows.

Snow Equipment List
CLE operates and maintains the following equipment for the purpose of snow and ice control:
Qty Description
13 24’ plow / 22’ broom multi-purpose high speed Oshkosh / MB-Companies snow removal vehicles
15 22’ and 24’ plows on Oshkosh, Volvo, and International 6X6 trucks with 15 yard dump bodies.
2 20’ self-propelled front mounted runway brooms.
10 Runway Snow Blowers: 2 Oshkosh, 6 Schmidt Wausau, and 2 MB Companies Blowers with 5’-75’ at a rate of 3000 to 7000 tons per hour.
6 Material spreader trucks: 3 Ford tandems and 3 International tandems spreader trucks.
8 Wheel loaders with 3-5 yard buckets with various size pusher boxes.
1 Caterpillar grader with 14 foot blade
3 Runway deicer trucks with 4000 gallon capacity and 50’ spray bar coverage with throttle and vehicle speed coverage.
3 Bombardier parking lot plows
4 Parking lot single axle plow trucks, 3 with material spreaders
1 John Deere 310 backhoe with 12’ pusher box
2 Trecan snow melters with 160 tons per hour capacity
4 Trecan snow melters with 80 tons per hour capacity
1 Light and sign plow mounted on Ford Bi-directional tractor.

However, this adds up to only about 75 pieces, so there are 30 more by now. In 2016, they added 6 plow/broom vehicles (and a bunch of other stuff). In 2017 they added 2 more plow broom vehicles and 4 trucks like mine (and another 4 with snowblowers and a bunch of other stuff). $18 million spent on snow removal equipment in 2016 and 2017.

Assuming they got rid of everything they had before, they would still have 12 brooms. If they kept everything, they would have 27.

Here's a recent article depicting some of the snow equipment and their 97,000 sq foot garage.

https://www.cleveland.com/expo/news/erry-2018/11/0891e9e2165877/cleveland-hopkins-internationa.html
 

John_DeereGreen

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
Wooster, OH
That’s pretty cool, they’re using an agriculture sprayer to plow over runway lights and put deicer down. Lot of iron waiting for the snow to fall.

I wonder how long it takes them to handle a 2-3” snowfall from start to finish.
 

BUFF

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
FR NoCo
Well, I was off by at 50%, and probably 100%. Here's an equipment list from the CLE Snow and Ice Control Plan (dated 2009), showing 15 brooms, 13 of which also have plows.

Snow Equipment List
CLE operates and maintains the following equipment for the purpose of snow and ice control:
Qty Description
13 24’ plow / 22’ broom multi-purpose high speed Oshkosh / MB-Companies snow removal vehicles
15 22’ and 24’ plows on Oshkosh, Volvo, and International 6X6 trucks with 15 yard dump bodies.
2 20’ self-propelled front mounted runway brooms.
10 Runway Snow Blowers: 2 Oshkosh, 6 Schmidt Wausau, and 2 MB Companies Blowers with 5’-75’ at a rate of 3000 to 7000 tons per hour.
6 Material spreader trucks: 3 Ford tandems and 3 International tandems spreader trucks.
8 Wheel loaders with 3-5 yard buckets with various size pusher boxes.
1 Caterpillar grader with 14 foot blade
3 Runway deicer trucks with 4000 gallon capacity and 50’ spray bar coverage with throttle and vehicle speed coverage.
3 Bombardier parking lot plows
4 Parking lot single axle plow trucks, 3 with material spreaders
1 John Deere 310 backhoe with 12’ pusher box
2 Trecan snow melters with 160 tons per hour capacity
4 Trecan snow melters with 80 tons per hour capacity
1 Light and sign plow mounted on Ford Bi-directional tractor.

However, this adds up to only about 75 pieces, so there are 30 more by now. In 2016, they added 6 plow/broom vehicles (and a bunch of other stuff). In 2017 they added 2 more plow broom vehicles and 4 trucks like mine (and another 4 with snowblowers and a bunch of other stuff). $18 million spent on snow removal equipment in 2016 and 2017.

Assuming they got rid of everything they had before, they would still have 12 brooms. If they kept everything, they would have 27.

Here's a recent article depicting some of the snow equipment and their 97,000 sq foot garage.

https://www.cleveland.com/expo/news/erry-2018/11/0891e9e2165877/cleveland-hopkins-internationa.html
That's a lot of skin in the game....
 
OP
Aerospace Eng

Aerospace Eng

2000 Club Member
Location
Zelienople, PA
That’s pretty cool, they’re using an agriculture sprayer to plow over runway lights and put deicer down. Lot of iron waiting for the snow to fall.

I wonder how long it takes them to handle a 2-3” snowfall from start to finish.
The clearance time for busy commercial airports is 30 minutes for priority 1 areas in a 1" snowfall weighing 25 #/ft^3. This includes the active runways, taxiway to the ramp area, and access to/from ARFF.

Priority 2 and 3 areas are allowed to take longer.

Basically plow with the storm on priority one areas, work on priority 2 when not actively plowing priority 1 (airplanes are landing and taking off), and then priority 3 when priority 2 is clear.

If they are lucky during a storm the winds won't shift and they just keep a single runway open.

See sections 1.6 - 1.8 in the following document for bedtime reading.

https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/150-5200-30D.pdf

For small airports, priority 1 areas are supposed to be cleared in 2-6 hours, but many small airports don't have the equipment to do this.

A nearby airport to Zelienople, for example, has a single 550 with a plow for the runway/taxiway, a loader with box for aprons, and an F-350 with plow for between hangars. A little bit further away, Grove City airport has a single pickup with plow, the last I knew.

Zelienople has:

Airport Owned:
Barko 937 Forestry machine with 16' sweepster rotary broom
Late 1990s? F-250 with a 7'6" Meyer straight blade
1948 Sicard Snowblower (rebuilt/re-engined in 1984) (blower mouth is 8' wide, 5' tall)

FBO owned:
Ex PennDOT 6 wheel with a right casting plow that is manually swingable and a UTG spreader for sand,
Ex PennDOT 6 wheel with a non-reversible highway plow and wing plow.
2016 F-250 with a snoway 29R

Owned by me:
1991 Moxy with 16' super duty push box
1993 Schmidt 16' Rotary Brooms (2)
1996 Ingersoll Rand VR90B with a 12' skid steer push box
2008 Belos Trans Giant with 7' broom and 54" blower.
 

John_DeereGreen

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
Wooster, OH
The clearance time for busy commercial airports is 30 minutes for priority 1 areas in a 1" snowfall weighing 25 #/ft^3. This includes the active runways, taxiway to the ramp area, and access to/from ARFF.

Priority 2 and 3 areas are allowed to take longer.

Basically plow with the storm on priority one areas, work on priority 2 when not actively plowing priority 1 (airplanes are landing and taking off), and then priority 3 when priority 2 is clear.

If they are lucky during a storm the winds won't shift and they just keep a single runway open.

See sections 1.6 - 1.8 in the following document for bedtime reading.

https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/150-5200-30D.pdf

For small airports, priority 1 areas are supposed to be cleared in 2-6 hours, but many small airports don't have the equipment to do this.

A nearby airport to Zelienople, for example, has a single 550 with a plow for the runway/taxiway, a loader with box for aprons, and an F-350 with plow for between hangars. A little bit further away, Grove City airport has a single pickup with plow, the last I knew.

Zelienople has:

Airport Owned:
Barko 937 Forestry machine with 16' sweepster rotary broom
Late 1990s? F-250 with a 7'6" Meyer straight blade
1948 Sicard Snowblower (rebuilt/re-engined in 1984) (blower mouth is 8' wide, 5' tall)

FBO owned:
Ex PennDOT 6 wheel with a right casting plow that is manually swingable and a UTG spreader for sand,
Ex PennDOT 6 wheel with a non-reversible highway plow and wing plow.
2016 F-250 with a snoway 29R

Owned by me:
1991 Moxy with 16' super duty push box
1993 Schmidt 16' Rotary Brooms (2)
1996 Ingersoll Rand VR90B with a 12' skid steer push box
2008 Belos Trans Giant with 7' broom and 54" blower.
Given the list of equipment they have at their disposal, shouldn’t be hard to manage just about any amount of snow!
 
OP
Aerospace Eng

Aerospace Eng

2000 Club Member
Location
Zelienople, PA
The broom on Thing 46 is worn out. A few weeks ago, the airport tried to take it off, but didn't want to pull too hard because they weren't sure what was on the inside. The parts book said it was just a spline, but they weren't sure. I called Gene at the Niagara Falls Airport. He was super helpful.

He indicated that the brooms were simply splined on the inboard side. He said the best tool was a side shift forklift to take the load off the spline and then just ease it out, but I don't have one of those. So, a telehandler on one side, and an aircraft tug on the other and the cores came off the splines.

Broom Cores Removed.jpg


The next step should have been standing the cores up, and pulling them out of the bristles, then flipping them and stacking new wafers and spacers on them.

However, reality intervened. The left side splines are completely trashed. I'm not even sure how they were still turning the broom, but they were.

Left side spline.jpg


left drum.jpg


The right side is worn, but not as bad.

right side spline.jpg

right drum.jpg


Tomorrow we are going to pull the cores off of Thing 47, that has the broken motor but a much less worn set of bristles. If those splines are reasonable, we will just swap differentials and cores between the broom heads and then go about repairing the differential axles and broom cores from Thing 46.

The differential itself appears to be a GM 10.5" 14 bolt.

differential.jpg


If Wausau isn't helpful or is outrageous in pricing or lead time, does anyone know where I could get custom stub axles made?

Broom Diff 1.jpg

Broom Diff 2.jpg
 

BUFF

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
FR NoCo
These 2 items I assume?
upload_2019-2-14_17-23-41.png


Talked to a buddy that builds stuff for Land rovers which includes heavier axles. He's been using Moser for custom shafts http://www.moserengineering.com/
Local to me in Mark Williams (he was a year younger than me in HS), they also do custom stuff too
https://www.markwilliams.com/measuring-for-axles.html

The receiving end of the shaft looks like a flange with a welded "socket" with spines, that would be a Wire EDM operation or Sinker EDM unless you wanted to broach them with a rotary table on a Bridgeport which sucks and blows BTW.
 
OP
Aerospace Eng

Aerospace Eng

2000 Club Member
Location
Zelienople, PA
Before I went to CA last week, I was working on restoring threads on the broom bogies. The nuts had come off with great difficulty and the threads were all messed up. They are 1 1/4-12. I thought about turning the stub down and using 1"-12 nuts, as they only provide preload for the bearings.

I decided to see what I could do, so I bought a 1 1/4-12 thread chasing die (basically a die with hex flats). It would not go on, because material had been rolled into the thread valleys. I needed something that would pick up the good threads and use them to locate the valleys.

I then bought an OTC thread chasing tool. It is good for 1"-5" threads. I didn't expect much, since it is just a single set of teeth held against the threads by an adjustable v-block of sorts. I used it like a pipe cutter, and was eventually able to get the valleys deep enough to get the thread chaser on.

The threads don't look great, but they are plenty strong and there are 3 full threads that the nut engages with.



I also used it to clean up some 1" threads on a rod-end for my telehandler. It did that as well.
Small victories.....
IMG_3284.JPG

IMG_3283.JPG

IMG_3282.JPG
 
OP
Aerospace Eng

Aerospace Eng

2000 Club Member
Location
Zelienople, PA
I took a day off of work today to help ensure there was an operable broom.

When I got there, the differential had been pulled from Thing 46. As a result I couldn't test my hypothesis that the wear may have had to do with improper phasing of the universal joints on the driveshaft.

It turns out that Wausau had done something clever. The lifting rings double as places the cylinders used to adjust the deflector can hook up to, making it easy to lift and secure the hood.

IMG_3285.JPG

IMG_3286.JPG


IMG_3288.JPG

The underside of the hood and the rear of the frame were in good shape, although there are cracks in the corner of the hood near the hinge. A battle for a later date.

I went and got thing 47, and just drove it with the bristles rolling on the ground since the bogies are out of it getting repaired as detailed above.

Fortunately, when we yanked the broom cores from Thing 47, the splines were in good shape.


IMG_3291.JPG

IMG_3292.JPG


The differential is also a 14 bolt, but the cover has ribs on it whereas the one off of Thing 46 did not.

At any rate, we swapped the differential and cores from Thing 47 into Thing 46, taking the opportunity to liberally apply grease to the driveshaft and U-joints from the hydraulic motor as well as to the splines themselves. Also drained and refilled the differential.

IMG_3293.JPG

IMG_3294.JPG


Getting the splines to line up and slide in was not trivial. As Gene from Niagara had said, it would have been easier with a sideshift forklift. We mad do with the telehandler, a regular forklift, and a guy looking at the splines (with a mirror on the second core) to direct the forklift operation. We eventually got it done.

Total man hours performing the switch...about 30.

IMG_3297.JPG

The underside of Thing 47's broom head was not as clean.

IMG_3295.JPG


There are also more cracks in the hinge area and on the hood than on Thing 46. The plan now is to run Thing 46 as it now sits (with the cores and differential from Thing 47, and then take more time and do a complete restoration on the broom head on Thing 47. I'm almost done with the bogies. Now I will rebuild the differential, replace the axles and splines on the cores, weld up and strategically reinforce the hood, the frame, and the hinge area, and rebristle and reinstall the cores.

IMG_3290.JPG
 
OP
Aerospace Eng

Aerospace Eng

2000 Club Member
Location
Zelienople, PA
Started reassembling the bogies a few days ago. Lubed up the lower bearing (it will be difficult to access once assembled). I then Inserted the lower bearings and seal, and then painted that area. After it was dry, the upper mount assembly was installed on the shaft of the axle carrier.

IMG_3324.JPG


The steel brake shoe and Tivar lining were then installed in the upper mount, between the shaft and the housing of the upper mount. When I removed them, the shoe did not have the partial saw cut opposite the slot, although the manufacturing drawings showed it there. I believe it is there to make it more easy to apply pressure. I was actually tempted to just cut it in half.

IMG_3321.JPG

I then installed the "pistons" that are pushed on by the Belleville stack.

IMG_3322.JPG

IMG_3323.JPG

The plan for tomorrow is to install the upper bearing and cover.
 
OP
Aerospace Eng

Aerospace Eng

2000 Club Member
Location
Zelienople, PA
The broom head project hasn't been front burnered since one of the brooms is working fine, although I did replace the pneumatic with an electric actuator. (more about that in another post).

I finally started taking apart the differential, originally it was going to be a simple rebuild, but in trying to adjust the actuator for the hydrostatic transmission on the other broom, full throw could not be used, and wasn't being used on the pneumatic setup, which may or may not have been OEM.

I decided to go to a 5.13 ratio, versus the 4.10 that was installed.

The spiders were welded since the brooms need a spool.

resized_IMG_0692.jpg


I just went ahead and bought a spool from Mark Williams Enterprises.

I like the 14 bolt a lot, compared to other differentials. Easy disassembly, no spreaders required.

Since my wife was out of town, I brought the parts home.

Spool in the freezer....

resized_IMG_0949.jpg


Ring gear in the oven

resized_IMG_0950.jpg


Assembly was easy...the frost on the outside shows where the gear heat has made its way up the spool.

resized_IMG_0951.jpg


Tomorrow I'll take the bolts back out, add loctite to the threads, and torque them back into place.
 

BUFF

PlowSite Fanatic
Location
FR NoCo
The broom head project hasn't been front burnered since one of the brooms is working fine, although I did replace the pneumatic with an electric actuator. (more about that in another post).

I finally started taking apart the differential, originally it was going to be a simple rebuild, but in trying to adjust the actuator for the hydrostatic transmission on the other broom, full throw could not be used, and wasn't being used on the pneumatic setup, which may or may not have been OEM.

I decided to go to a 5.13 ratio, versus the 4.10 that was installed.

The spiders were welded since the brooms need a spool.

View attachment 207588

I just went ahead and bought a spool from Mark Williams Enterprises.

I like the 14 bolt a lot, compared to other differentials. Easy disassembly, no spreaders required.

Since my wife was out of town, I brought the parts home.

Spool in the freezer....

View attachment 207589

Ring gear in the oven

View attachment 207590

Assembly was easy...the frost on the outside shows where the gear heat has made its way up the spool.

View attachment 207591

Tomorrow I'll take the bolts back out, add loctite to the threads, and torque them back into place.
Mark Wiilliams makes some quality stuff.
Imo the best thing aboot a 14 bolt is the support the pinion gear has.
What kind of marinade did you use on the steak and what cut of steak is it.....
 
OP
Aerospace Eng

Aerospace Eng

2000 Club Member
Location
Zelienople, PA
Here are videos of one of the brooms on the runway and then taxiway.

The guy operating forgot to look at the windsock. Normally the wind is out of the west, but this time it was out of the east, so he was brooming angled into the wind.

It still worked, but didn't cast the snow as far as it should have.

The noise from the air blower and the broom itself drown out the noise from the detroit 2 strokes.

Runway


Taxiway


Yes, I need to take the audio off of automatic to avoid the wind noise.
 
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