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Oh I remove speed bumps for no charge. Jk we have a lot where they keep telling me they are getting new pavement every year. We clean up all the chunks in spring. Down to 1/2 speed bump from 4 over 5 years.

Also Had a concrete pad appear in a gravel lot 3-4” tall. Bent me plow bumper/frame a bit Switched from per push to hourly with bucket machine only. And we be reel careful by the suspect area now.
 

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aren't your speedbumps marked or why aren't you guys pulling the plow up over them? wonder if my setup is different for some reason but i can roll over speed bumps or pavement bumpbs and cracks and chunks fairly easily without destroying something. the problem is knowing it's there.
 

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I was referring to damage to MY equipment due to lack of them keeping their lot in good repair.
You can always try to write in something to that affect. Might me a tough go to hold your client responsible for something like that. We would (along with several subs) get flat tires left and right servicing a large auto plant. There were areas constantly littered with small scraps and shards of steel. They had a truck with a large magnet mounted on the front of it in the effort to get rid of the hazard. They would not entertain the idea of reimbursing us for this cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
You can always try to write in something to that affect. Might me a tough go to hold your client responsible for something like that. We would (along with several subs) get flat tires left and right servicing a large auto plant. There were areas constantly littered with small scraps and shards of steel. They had a truck with a large magnet mounted on the front of it in the effort to get rid of the hazard. They would not entertain the idea of reimbursing us for this cost.
Thanks, I was hoping you would give your $.02.

Like I said, nothing has happened yet and hopefully it stays that way. Just curious though as some customers seem to want to cheap out on asphalt maintenance. Probably a good way to lose a customer as well.
 

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Honestly I don't think there's much that can be done about it. I've talked to my lawyer about it before in having something wrote up and he said it's basically like holding a client responsible for getting a flat tire mowing.

His suggestion was/is.... Before plow season begins take photos, have stuff in writing, etc... that is discussed with the client on potential issues with their lot. Have your "CYA" and let them know what will or won't be done and have signatures in case any of their stuff gets torn up pretty bad.

As far as their property tearing up your equipment if it came down to it you are basically performing an "at will" service and no one is forcing you therefore not much leg to stand on, according to my lawyer..... Unless you can get it in writing that they will be liable for equipment, THEN it's a matter of documenting and proving that it happened at XXXX company property.
 

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It must be nice to only plow smooth, seamless pavement.

I guess that’s the luxuries of plowing in the big city.

The condition of the shut off standpipe should’ve been noted when the parking lot was inspected prior to bid or when it was staked,,, out.

ITs he plow-Jackie’s responsibility to know where there plowing .
Jmo
 

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We have a building that had a large fire. The next winter, their already terrible parking lot got alot worse. There was alot of sinking, especially by the drains. The said they would be re-paving in the next year or two, obviously that wasnt going to help me for that winter. They ended up signing an amended contracted stating they wouldnt hold me liable for any areas that were "uneven", which was pretty much the whole property. I ended up leaving the blade an inch or so up and plowed like that.

Equipment damage aside.. how can you be liable for slip and falls in a parking lot that looked like a warzone, I dont care how much salt you use.
Wheel Car Tire Land vehicle Vehicle
 

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If you used the same level of care as the average person are you liable ?
Ice is a naturally occurring event.

Did you create the hazard ?

Then once becoming aware of the hazard what steps did you take to meditate The hazard and when
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I don't meditate while plowing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
It must be nice to only plow smooth, seamless pavement.

I guess that's the luxuries of plowing in the big city.

The condition of the shut off standpipe should've been noted when the parking lot was inspected prior to bid or when it was staked,,, out.

ITs he plow-Jackie's responsibility to know where there plowing .
Jmo
It was just a question for discussion. Lots are probably worse in the city, but most of my accounts are in the 'burbs anyways.
 

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I have dropped customers that have driveways that looked better than that. Doing that lot your just begging for broken equipment or complaints that "you dug up the pavement". NOT worth the job.

Id Fire them!
But thats just me.

You should see my parking lot. I don't know how my garbage plow hasn't broke yet. I generally cannot even put the plow on the ground, the entire thing is potholes and cracks. I charged accordingly to maintain this lot and have to use more salt than I like, but it's still going to be quite profitable.

In lawncare, I do not charge the customer if I run over something in their yard. I typically make a point to do a very good walk through prior to servicing, just as I do with parking lots. With a crew it's different, because you have to mark and notify all your workers. for me, I just remember the bad spots and lift the plow when i get to them but it would be much better if the lot was in good shape and i could plow it clean. some of those chunks are so loose when you walk on them they move, water sits under there and it's just a mess. OH well.

View attachment 198667

View attachment 198668
 

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I fired a job last year . Was a place where they are court ordered to take pee test and get counseling . Lot was a mess . Id been plowing it for ten years . Got so bad I was afraid every time I want in that the whole lot was going to peel up . Plus with all the loosers in and out of the place from 8 am till 8 pm was just a matter of time before someone slipped or fell .
 

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Honestly I don't think there's much that can be done about it. I've talked to my lawyer about it before in having something wrote up and he said it's basically like holding a client responsible for getting a flat tire mowing.

His suggestion was/is.... Before plow season begins take photos, have stuff in writing, etc... that is discussed with the client on potential issues with their lot. Have your "CYA" and let them know what will or won't be done and have signatures in case any of their stuff gets torn up pretty bad.

As far as their property tearing up your equipment if it came down to it you are basically performing an "at will" service and no one is forcing you therefore not much leg to stand on, according to my lawyer..... Unless you can get it in writing that they will be liable for equipment, THEN it's a matter of documenting and proving that it happened at XXXX company property.
I don't like lawyers. Unless it's mine. Regardless your lawyer nailed a basic industry standard. Perform and document a preseason site inspection. Have your client acknowledge and sign it. File it for your protection later.
 

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We have a building that had a large fire. The next winter, their already terrible parking lot got alot worse. There was alot of sinking, especially by the drains. The said they would be re-paving in the next year or two, obviously that wasnt going to help me for that winter. They ended up signing an amended contracted stating they wouldnt hold me liable for any areas that were "uneven", which was pretty much the whole property. I ended up leaving the blade an inch or so up and plowed like that.

Equipment damage aside.. how can you be liable for slip and falls in a parking lot that looked like a warzone, I dont care how much salt you use. View attachment 198684
You are the man. That's exactly what you should do. Addendum's are easy to add to your scope of work/contract. And that picture is the best defense you can produce.
 

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I don't like lawyers. Unless it's mine. Regardless your lawyer nailed a basic industry standard. Perform and document a preseason site inspection. Have your client acknowledge and sign it. File it for your protection later.
I tend to agree concerning lawyers.... Over the years on the lawn care side and even on the plowing side I've found it invaluable to do pre-contract walk through with the property managers and point out potential issues. You know what you get when you "assume"..... If things are in writing, documented, etc, there's a lot less to assume when finger pointing comes.
 

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I have dropped customers that have driveways that looked better than that. Doing that lot your just begging for broken equipment or complaints that "you dug up the pavement". NOT worth the job.

Id Fire them!
But thats just me.
salt salt salt.

somebodys' gotta do it, and at a pretty penny as well. My equipment is junk, i can take my time and be careful and get the lot taken care of. If you have the option to pick and chose accounts because you're busy, that's one thing. This here is my only account, it's a good paying one, and my beater truck and plow are ideal for the situation. If i have to leave plow up a bit to get around the bad spots, so be it, i'll put down more salt. I've taken photos of everything and mentioned in writing how poor the lot is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Lest I get accused of starting 600 threads, I'll post to this one.

2 of the really bad lots I was referring to in this thread have been repaved now.

1 is in the process, but we stopped backing into their loading dock due to the crater at the end of the seament. I was seriously concerned that we would break a spring, axle, frame, tyre it had such a deep crater.
 

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IMO holding clients for repairs is like getting a politician to do the right thing.

We have rough spots on all properties. We add cost for slowing down, back dragging in spots or blowing the area with rubber paddles. For direct clients, I walk them through the costs associated with maintaining those areas vs smooth pavement. I have yet to lose a client over the nominal per push increases with rough or bad pavement areas. If they are talking with me they already want me.
 
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