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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, this past snow, I think my motor finally died. This RT3 straight blade was bought new in 03, and literally has had nothing ever replaced on it besides a hose or two. I was plowing, and the plow started moving slower and slower, until it finally wouldn't move anymore and the solenoid just clicked.

Anyways, an OEM motor is about $240-$270 around me. An OEM aftermarket runs $90-$130.

We've run the aftermarket Western motors with relatively no problems. What's the general consensus on Boss aftermarkets? I'm guessing their a PITA to change since the power unit has to come out anyways. While I'm there, I'm going to give this a fluid change and clean the filter since it's never been done.
 

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This RT3 straight blade was bought new in 03, and literally has had nothing ever replaced
Bought new in 03 correct?

While I'm there, I'm going to give this a fluid change and clean the filter since it's never been done.
WHAT in 15 years you've never changed the fluid,, EVER?
You need to service the plow every year, if not every 2.....but every year is better.
Wow just wow
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Crazy, right?

This used to be my grandpas truck. I don't think he ever did anything to it, and I haven't either. I guess I have been and I am scared of breaking the bolts off of the power unit. I'm going to call around to a few machine shops to ask them if they would be able to remove the broken bolts, if I do snap them. I plan on using a little heat, taking care to not damage the aluminum, to try to remove the bolts.

I know there are people who hate Boss plows, and truthfully, I'm more of a western fan. I have 2 Boss plows, and 8 Westerns. However, This motor failing is literally the first thing that's ever broken on this besides hoses. I really can't complain or dog on Boss.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I found this around the internet heard good things hope this helps. http://glenwoodautoelectric.com/pump-motorswinch-motors/monarch-bucher-8111d
Thanks! I actually just picked up one for $90 from my local plow parts supplier. It's going to have to work for now. Meanwhile, I'll get that one ordered from Glenwood just to have as a backup.

If the original motor lasted 16 years, maybe there is something to be said for OEM quality...
This is obvious, but I was just wondering if there was an actual difference between OEM/Aftermarket, or if they are all built by the same factory but different stickers and prices on them.
 

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Thanks! I actually just picked up one for $90 from my local plow parts supplier. It's going to have to work for now. Meanwhile, I'll get that one ordered from Glenwood just to have as a backup.

This is obvious, but I was just wondering if there was an actual difference between OEM/Aftermarket, or if they are all built by the same factory but different stickers and prices on them.
I can't speak for any particular Aftermarket motor, but I can tell you that the AM motors I've seen in general look nothing like the OEMs. They usually look like the kind of piece where you open the box and it makes you say "Well, at least it was cheap..."
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For what it's worth, and in case anybody stumbles upon this post...

I got the fluid changes and the new motor on. I ended up reusing the old reservoir o-ring since it was in almost perfect shape. The fluid looked as clean as could be. However, there was a nice chunk of metal/sludge particle on the magnetic drain plug. I removed the reservoir and cleaned it out. The filters were also spotless. I sprayed those out with brake clean. I removed the motor, but the old bearing stayed in. I had a ***** of a time trying to get it out. I ended up grinding down the smallest jaw of the puller kit that I have, and used it in conjunction with the slide hammer. The new and old motor are pretty much identicle in size, weight, and innards. I put the new motor on. I used anti-sieze on all 4 of the reservoir bolts, both motor bolts, and all 4 bolts that hold the power unit on. The plow is working great.... For now.
 

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For what it's worth, and in case anybody stumbles upon this post...

I got the fluid changes and the new motor on. I ended up reusing the old reservoir o-ring since it was in almost perfect shape. The fluid looked as clean as could be. However, there was a nice chunk of metal/sludge particle on the magnetic drain plug. I removed the reservoir and cleaned it out. The filters were also spotless. I sprayed those out with brake clean. I removed the motor, but the old bearing stayed in. I had a ***** of a time trying to get it out. I ended up grinding down the smallest jaw of the puller kit that I have, and used it in conjunction with the slide hammer. The new and old motor are pretty much identicle in size, weight, and innards. I put the new motor on. I used anti-sieze on all 4 of the reservoir bolts, both motor bolts, and all 4 bolts that hold the power unit on. The plow is working great.... For now.
Well praise GOD, glad it's all working.
 

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Glad to hear
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well praise GOD, glad it's all working.
I wasn't really worried about it not working. I knew it was just the motor that died, but I figured while I was there I'd change the fluid and remove the reservoir and clean it out and the filters. I was VERY surprised to see how clean the fluid was for this thing never ever having a fluid change.

Another thing that I have to comment on is, I don't know if I just got lucky or not, but I can't believe that none of the bolts snapped. It seems as if Boss did something right with the design of the front cover and housing that surrounds the power unit. I will definitely be changing this fluid once per year, now that I know how easy it is to do.
 

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I wasn't really worried about it not working. I knew it was just the motor that died, but I figured while I was there I'd change the fluid and remove the reservoir and clean it out and the filters. I was VERY surprised to see how clean the fluid was for this thing never ever having a fluid change.

Another thing that I have to comment on is, I don't know if I just got lucky or not, but I can't believe that none of the bolts snapped. It seems as if Boss did something right with the design of the front cover and housing that surrounds the power unit. I will definitely be changing this fluid once per year, now that I know how easy it is to do.
Also i was told to use the fluid recommended for snow plows. I don't want to start a war but heard it helps out with freezing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm not saying what I used, but it was definitely snow plow fluid. I have been running it for years in Westerns, Meyers, and a few Boss's. Apparently, if it was so bad for This Boss plow, surely SOMETHING in the valve body/pump would have gone bad by now, one would think.
 

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Getting back to the OP's question, generally speaking, there are two kinds of aftermarket parts. First, there are parts made by the same (out sourced) supplier that makes them for the OEM - just sold out the side door. (OEMs hate this and go to great lengths to make sure this doesn't happen)

Second, there are "reverse engineered" parts where an aftermarket supplier takes an OEM part and figures out how it was made, then decides how they can make the same thing for less. But without inside knowledge of how and why certain components are made the way they were, what the tolerances were and why certain finishes were used, many problems can arise even thought the parts look "identical." Auto Parts stores are filled with this kind of crap today - much of it manufactured in China. The problem is, it's hard to tell - unless one knows what to look for - what a decent aftermarket part is compared to a crap knock off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Getting back to the OP's question, generally speaking, there are two kinds of aftermarket parts. First, there are parts made by the same (out sourced) supplier that makes them for the OEM - just sold out the side door. (OEMs hate this and go to great lengths to make sure this doesn't happen)

Second, there are "reverse engineered" parts where an aftermarket supplier takes an OEM part and figures out how it was made, then decides how they can make the same thing for less. But without inside knowledge of how and why certain components are made the way they were, what the tolerances were and why certain finishes were used, many problems can arise even thought the parts look "identical." Auto Parts stores are filled with this kind of crap today - much of it manufactured in China. The problem is, it's hard to tell - unless one knows what to look for - what a decent aftermarket part is compared to a crap knock off.
Thank you for the explanation of this. This makes sense completely. I've always wondered why some "aftermarket" equipment and/or parts seem equal to or better than the OEM, and why others are just absolute crap. I am going to give this motor a go for now and see how long it holds up for. If we can get at least 4-5 years out of our AM Unimount motors with stupid operators who overwork them, I'm hoping that I can get at least that out of this with me running it. I will report back if there is an issue with it this year.
 

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I should add that there is a (large) third category. That would be legitimate aftermarket replacement parts made to the OEM manufacturers specifications. These tend to be more expensive than the Chinese knock offs, but somewhat less expensive than the OEM parts. And since so many folks are just looking for the least expensive part when they go to the counter, these rarely get recommended.
 
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