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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to use a PTFE sealant compound on the h.p. hoses in my Speedcast setup, but Fisher literature says specifically to assemble these dry and tightened 1 1/4 turns from finger tight.

I've got a couple weeping, tried slightly tightening them (another eighth of a turn) but I see they're still weeping.

I'm tempted to just go back to coating these threads. What do you guys do?

I once did Teflon tape but stopped that a long time ago after hearing about potential blockages from that. But the thread compound seem like a good idea (and keeps threads from seizing if they get wet/stay assembled too long.
 

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The people that write this garbage are people who don't actually use plows...
 

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Dope is actually the stuff that would cuase blockage if over applied. Teflon tape is generally installed wrong. Most people just wrap it around the thread without any thought wich way they are wrapping. These 2 and all mentioned above are good stuff. Not sure why fisher would say dry or any npt thread for that matter. Npt thread is supposed to be sealed. I only know this becuase i was a hydraulic plumber for foundry heavy equipment before i decided to spend my life savings on landscape construction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies. I'm going back to coating those threads. Walked out this morning and saw that annoying red stain in the snow below one of my angle ram fittings. It was just a few drops but it shouldn't leak at all.

I have this "Swan Seal" stuff that's a PTFE paste, should do the job (https://blackswanmfg.com/New2017/in...-joint-category-2/swan-seal-product-page-2017).

That's what I get for following the manufacturer's directions, right?

Teflon tape is probably fine if you wrap it clockwise and stay back from the end of the fitting. But I've had pretty good luck with the paste.
 

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Theoretically tape or pipe dope can all cause issues. I don't always pay attention to what direction I'm wrapping the tape in, just make sure none will get into the hose or fitting.

Kind of funny, I was chastised the other day for not reading my manual about the stupid soft stop or whatever it's called and here you read it and follow the directions that don't work. @cwren2472
 

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I hate pipe dope. It gets all over everything. We tape just about all our tapered threads. Once we get up to 1 1/2' or 2" NPT, then tape and dope.

Anything compression is when the dope comes out.
Agreed, it's like anti-seize. Not sure we even have any dope in the shop. Pipe dope that is...
 

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Kind of funny, I was chastised the other day for not reading my manual about the stupid soft stop or whatever it's called and here you read it and follow the directions that don't work. @cwren2472
I'm curious to see which document from Fisher/Western tells you not to put anything on NPT fittings. Later documents will say that because they use o-ring or JIC, but I couldn't find anything in my old literature (for plows that had NPT fittings) saying what the OP stated. Not saying it doesn't exist - I did see an old manual stating to use ATF even though that's no longer recommended, just that I can't find anything saying that NPT fittings shouldn't be taped or otherwise sealed.
 

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For all the comments that state dope gets into the manifold: one simply has to not overapply...a little goes a long way, and not much is needed. I've been applying it and copper, tape, etc. for decades w/o a problem. I.E. a little on the bottom half of the male threads and you're done. Much like a kid with a gallon of glue or peanut butter, it's an utter mess if you are careless.
 

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Much like a kid with a gallon of glue or peanut butter, it's an utter mess if you are careless.
It also depends on the type of dope that you use... :nod:

Megaloc / Most PTFE dopes- wipes clean with a rag, come out in the wash

Rector Seal or Blue Monster Nickel w/ Anti Seize for stainless... you cannot be careful enough. You will be wearing it by the end of the day. :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
It was a "Torque Chart for Hydraulic Units" in 2005. Says:

DO NOT use any type of sealant or tape on the fittings​
or hoses. This could damage product.

I do find the compound a tad messy but it cleans up easy with a rag as needed. Try to just coat the male threads well and keep it well away from the last few threads at the end.

So this document also had a recommended "turns from finger-tight." For my quarter inch lines it says 1-1/2-2 turns. Seems like some of mine snug up pretty good well before then. Do you guys just go by feel?
 

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It was a "Torque Chart for Hydraulic Units" in 2005. Says:

DO NOT use any type of sealant or tape on the fittings​
or hoses. This could damage product.

I do find the compound a tad messy but it cleans up easy with a rag as needed. Try to just coat the male threads well and keep it well away from the last few threads at the end.

So this document also had a recommended "turns from finger-tight." For my quarter inch lines it says 1-1/2-2 turns. Seems like some of mine snug up pretty good well before then. Do you guys just go by feel?
All done by feel and what way the fitting needs to be facing (if applicable)

How big of a wrench are you using?

On 2" pipe, a 14" pipe wrench will not typically yeild a full turn past hand tight, but if you grab a set of 48" wrenches... how many full turns you want to stop at?
 

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It was a "Torque Chart for Hydraulic Units" in 2005. Says:

DO NOT use any type of sealant or tape on the fittings​
or hoses. This could damage product.

I do find the compound a tad messy but it cleans up easy with a rag as needed. Try to just coat the male threads well and keep it well away from the last few threads at the end.

So this document also had a recommended "turns from finger-tight." For my quarter inch lines it says 1-1/2-2 turns. Seems like some of mine snug up pretty good well before then. Do you guys just go by feel?
But did it say NPT fittings specifically? Because in 2005 they were using JIC fittings and those instructions would have been correct for those.
 

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But did it say NPT fittings specifically? Because in 2005 they were using JIC fittings and those instructions would have been correct for those.
I was gonna ask the same thing, npt is not a high pressure system and requires sealing, and philbilly is correct about the directional flow of npt fitting presentation especially a union.
 

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I just googled that exact phrase and it came up in the Western manual. See the sentence immediately proceeding the one you copied:

" NOTE: Over torquing JIC hose fittings will result in a fractured fitting. Do not use any type of sealant or tape on the fittings or hoses. This could damage product. Always use two wrenches to ensure proper tightening of fittings and hoses. Use the following procedure to install SAE O-Ring fittings in valve block and rams. "

It was a "Torque Chart for Hydraulic Units" in 2005. Says:

DO NOT use any type of sealant or tape on the fittings​
or hoses. This could damage product.
 
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