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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wound up purchasing an older American Lincoln 7700. Refurbished newer models (7760, 7765) go for about $25K, and new ones for a bunch more, although there isn't a lot of difference with the older ones.

This one was mostly working, and I got it to my hangar for $2600. The people selling refurbished newer models will tell you to not get an older one, as many parts have been made obsolete and are no longer available. This is mostly garbage, as most of the parts weren't made by American Lincoln anyway. I'm going to put "obsolete" or other parts on here as a resource for others.

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
One of the things I noticed when it was being moved was that the brakes did not work.

They are mechanical disc brakes. Mine had worn pads so that the mechanical lever was at the end of its travel.

Inside view

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Outside view, wheel removed (I have to take the hub off to get the inner pad out)

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The parts books for the 7700, 7760, and 7765 all give the same part number, 7-08-02006, but it is for the entire brake assembly, and prices are around $200. So this post isn't about obsolete parts. Instead, it is about a way to save $$ (without any jury rigging) instead of just buying what the manufacturer wants to sell you.

The way the brake works is that the lever (mounted on a pin on the inner pad that goes through the inner support) and inner support are curved, and when the lever is moved the inner pad (mounted so that it slides on two pins rigidly connecting the inner support and outer pad) is forced away from the inner support toward the outer pad, producing the clamping action. At the same time, the pins move in the frame, so that the outer pad and inner pad have the same clamping force on the disc.

Looking at the lever, it is clear that it is a bar welded onto a much shorter lever. Thus, this is not a unique American Lincoln part. I happened to be on a website looking for a replacement suction hose, and saw a picture of a disc brake setup that looked suspiciously similar, in their Cushman cart section. It is a parking brake for a Cushman truckster (and probably others as well.

I took a chance and ordered a new Cushman brake assembly, part number 882984. It was $150. It is identical, except for the tab welded to the lever....

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I can either swap the lever from the old one, or weld a bar to the new one, and it will work.

More importantly, I found a parts book online that had that part, and gave a breakdown...

http://campkahler.com/files/898459A-Parts-Manual-r1.pdf

To summarize, in case the link goes away,

American Lincoln 7-08-02006 (70802006) is a Cushman 882984, with an extension welded on the lever.

The Cushman part number for the pads (linings and plate) are:
inner: 884079
outer: 883141

They are currently available for less than $40 each on various websites.

Cushman also has a part number for the linings themselves 883487
and rivets 826077. I couldn't find those part numbers directly, but did find a place selling a lining kit (2 pads and 8 rivets) for $33.

https://www.vintagegolfcartparts.com/Item/HD_BrkLngKit

Also, if you put a washer, or washers between the lever and inner pad, this will take up some space and you can get more life out of the pads.

I'm going to put the new caliper on one side (using the old lever), refurbish the old caliper with a new lining kit, put that on the other side, refurbish the other caliper with a lining kit, and put it in a box as a spare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What is it?
It's a sweeper scrubber. It has a small gutter broom and a 14" diameter x 50" main broom in the front that sweeps forward into a hopper and a set of brushes and a squeegee at the back for washing (you can see the side squeegees in the picture, but the rear squeegee was not on for transport).

You sit next to the engine (diesel for this model), and over the brushes/squeegee.

100 gallon solution and recovery tanks. It's designed for larger warehouses and factories or sidewalks. I got it because the price was right (cheaper than a set of batteries for a medium ride-on-scrubber) and with a conventional scrubber you have to have the floor swept quite clean before they work well. This should be a single pass machine.
 

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I wound up purchasing an older American Lincoln 7700. Refurbished newer models (7760, 7765) go for about $25K, and new ones for a bunch more, although there isn't a lot of difference with the older ones.

This one was mostly working, and I got it to my hangar for $2600. The people selling refurbished newer models will tell you to not get an older one, as many parts have been made obsolete and are no longer available. This is mostly garbage, as most of the parts weren't made by American Lincoln anyway. I'm going to put "obsolete" or other parts on here as a resource for others.

View attachment 192905
I sure wish I knew you were looking for a sweeper. I got a tenant 95 diesel with a new aluminum hopper runs great for $2K cab heat nice machine. I don't have the mill head anymore and have no use for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This past weekend my lift was unoccupied, so I decided to continue work on the sweeper, rebuilding the squeegee and rear scrub brush system, since they had been inoperative since I got the machine.

I started it up, drove it onto the lift, and decided I'd lift the hopper so I could get under it more easily. The hopper moved up about two feet, and then stopped. I shut everything down, and noticed the "Zamboni" was bleeding. I lost a couple of gallons (no pictures).

Here's the aftermath today, after half a roll of pig mats on Sunday.....

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I don't have to worry about my floor rusting, that's for sure. The culprit is the return hose for the scrubber brushes (3 motors in series), but I will probably replace a bunch of hoses while I am under there. The sweeper broom motor hoses, for example, are not leaking but definitely need to be replaced.

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The broom is at the lower limit of bristle length, so I decided to replace it.

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The idler, broom, and hydraulic motor for the sweeping broom came out without too much trouble. While the sweeper worked, this will give me the opportunity to replace the rubber containment baffles.

However, the hydraulic leak was not the end of my troubles. The left side squeegee holder has a stuck pin. The right side came out easily, but the left has not budged with PB Blaster, heart, sledgehammer, etc...

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I finally decided to walk away for a while as I was beyond frustrated, and cleaned my clock on a lift arm. After I picked myself up off the floor, I decided to spray it with more PB Blaster and let it sit for a day.

I don't know what the mechanical gods want in the way of a sacrifice (blood, dirt, concussion, etc.) before they let the pin come out.

Hopefully, I don't have to hacksaw it like I did the pin on the boom lift.
 

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I decided to spray it with more PB Blaster and let it sit for a day.
I highly recommend this stuff over PB Blaster. Personally, I think it's better than Kroil.

Had a competing sales rep in that said Torq is definitely at the top of the list, but he thought Kroil was better. And he doesn't sell either.

The proof for me was the water in a styrofoam cup and they squirted some of the Torq in it, within a few seconds it ate the bottom of the cup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
None of the above penetrants was available locally in an open store. I did try Castle "Thrust" Nope.

It felt like the "Zamboni" was laughing at me.

Hacksaw time. I cheated a bit and used a portable bandsaw on those parts I could access with it.

This bearing (inner part of a 1.00x3.75 flanged bearing) was not going to either turn or come off the shaft.

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The mating part....
It's an interesting design. Theoretically, the shaft rotates in the bearings and has supports for the main broom. At the same time, there are sleeved arms that go backwards to support the scrub brush tray.

The outer sleeve is supposed to turn freely on the shaft, so the brushes can be independent of the sweeper. Nope. It has a zerk, so maybe I can force some grease in there and help it to press out.

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The other side....

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The pin for the left squeegee was also sawed. Hopefully it will press out.

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With the arms free due to cutting the shaft, the scrubber tray swung down, giving me access to the pin for the lift cylinder (after I remove a bunch more hydraulic mud and pressure wash it so I can safely remove the hydraulic lines without killing the brush motors due to dirt contamination.)

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I have to devise a way, like I did for the Belos, that this area can be effectively cleaned with pressure washing so the dirt doesn't build up.

I did order a new shaft (Nitrided steel) and new flanged bearings (stainless) to help mitigate future corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The pin still wouldn't come out, so I knocked the upper pin for the lift cylinder out.

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Then I undid the hydraulic lines (damned engineers put the fittings too close together for easy wrenching)

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Finally, I cut the scrubbing solution water feed hose, and the scrubbing deck was out.

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In addition to allowing me to repair it properly, i now have better access to deal with the shaft and bearing replacement.

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