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Found this 1996 f350 w a flatbed and 4wd. 5 speed. 460 engine. Dual rear wheels. 4.10 rears, non-limited slip. flatbed. Everything works on it. Has a leaky exhaust manifold and crack in windshield. Other than that it seems to run well.

I am looking for replace my 1991 dodge w150. It still works but it's old.

I plow my property whch consists of a private road almost a mile which also has some steeper grades. The dodge still feels a bit too light, sometimes it slides around even though it's all chained up. Deeper snow I get lots of wheel spin going up hill,yes w the chains on it. It has a big plaque of concrete in the bed.

So, would this be a good candidate ? I would add weight to the rear and chain it up.
Main question; this size truck good to plow with with a 5 speed ? Is dual rear wheels a benefit or downside?
Lastly, what plow to get for it and are the mounts still available for this year?

thanks all !
 

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If you are looking to buy a very old truck, you might want to try and find one with a plow already rather than adding a new plow to a 25 year old vehicle. Any new plow for that truck is likely to run you $6k or more.
 

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Main question; this size truck good to plow with with a 5 speed ? Is dual rear wheels a benefit or downside?
I have plowed along side pickup trucks with manuals... they suck. Not being able to "slip into the power" causes traction issues. It can be done, but an automatic has a converter that slips to allow you to hit your power band and not be direct couple every time you let the clutch out is preferred.

The duals spread put surface area, the more that you spread your weight out, the harder it is to apply the horsepower to the pavement.
 
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