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Your Tire Pressure, Do you lower or stay at recommended pressure?

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by johnnysnok, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. johnnysnok

    johnnysnok Member
    Messages: 46

    Do you run tire pressure at the recommended pressure or do you go higher or even lower trying to get the best traction. We used to lower the pressure when we were 4 wheelin in the sand to broaden our tire for more traction. Some say a wide tire in the snow acts like a snowshoe and stays more on top of the snow instead of dropping thru to the bottom.
    This question is just about pressure and not putting weight in your rig which we all do already. What have you guys found to work best for you??
     
  2. 32vld

    32vld Senior Member
    from LI, NY
    Messages: 621

    I had found that cars and light trucks from way back the manufacturers always posted less pressure then maximum tire rated pressure.
    Say 26 car 32 tire.

    What I found was the added pressure did not make the ride harsher but it made a big difference in the tread wearing longer. With no decrease in traction.

    So I have always keep my pressure at the tire rating instead of the manufacturer rating.

    Then when radials replaced bias tires the tire air pressure went up to 35 psi with car rating staying below tire rating.

    Again running psi at tire pressure instead of vehicle rating same results.

    Now with tires having psi ratings of 44 I have found that the tire if kept at 44 will not longer wear out even when the vehicle spends most of the time unloaded. These higher pressures will cause the tire dia in the center 1/3 rd of the thread area to be greater then the outer 1/3 thirds of the tread area.

    Causing the center thread area to wear out faster causing the tire need replacement a lot sooner.

    So I run my tires at 35 psi.
     
  3. johnnysnok

    johnnysnok Member
    Messages: 46

    You certainly know your way around a tire and that was very insightful, props to you!

    I was really wondering about the times people are plowing and if they changed there pressure at that time and then went back to there chosen pressure?

    But i think i may try your thoughts and run at 35psi, since i just invested 1k on new tires.
     
  4. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    I run my tires at the pressure recommended by the tire manufacturer based on the actual load.
     
  5. got-h2o

    got-h2o 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,439

    Wow. I run 85 and they're still spongy.
     
  6. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    Yeah, but your plows and spreaders are too heavy for the truck anyway.
     
  7. got-h2o

    got-h2o 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,439

    LOL see thats why hahahahahaha. But all kidding aside, I take them down to 55 or so in the off season depending what I'm using the trucks for. I suppose it really depends what vehocles and what tires we are talking about. The majority of my trucks these days have E 235/85/16's on them. They're rated at 85 lbs and close to 4k per tire IIRC. I like the narrower width for plowing. I do notice a big difference in a similar rated 285/75. Even though they're rated the same, if not more, the 285's width vs height really hurts the structural integrety. You feel it big time going down the road. Although I have always prefered the look of a 285 in comparison.
     
  8. Burkartsplow

    Burkartsplow PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,245

    80 psi all around.have to with all the weight on the truck.
     
  9. Luis@ NJ

    Luis@ NJ Member
    Messages: 30

    I keep mine at 65psi but the tires say up to 85psi. You guys that keep them at 35psi dont notice a lot of sag when your trucks are loaded up?
     
  10. 32vld

    32vld Senior Member
    from LI, NY
    Messages: 621

    If you read my post my tires are rated at 44 psi. Running at 35 psi is not causing problems with my loads and what I tow.

    I don't think any one here that has 80+ psi rating tires is running them on 35 psi.

    I will ask those that have tires rated at 80+ psi what does the tire pressure on the door jamb call for?
     
  11. yardguy28

    yardguy28 Senior Member
    Messages: 485

    my tires are 20" tires and the max recommended pressure is 50 psi.

    i fill them up to 45-46 psi when i do check them. i use this number all year long. no different from spring to winter.
     
  12. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    I do Thumbs Up
     
  13. EIB

    EIB Senior Member
    Messages: 258

    My 03 F350 tires are rated for 80psi on the sidewall. On the door fronts 50 rears 80. During the winter I run the rears at 80 and fronts at 65 to 70, After the winter season fronts go back to 50 and rears 65 to 80 depending on what I'm doing.
     
  14. mpriester

    mpriester Senior Member
    Messages: 404

    i personally let the ply of the tire guide me on the pressure, right now i have 6 ply tires on mine and the suggested tire pressure is 35 and i have 45 in them due to the added weight, i wasn't going out to buy new tires when what was on it had a good year of use left in them, the added pressure helped with the sidewall roll due to the added weight, letting air out of the tires in the winter for added traction doesn't really work but it does cause the tires to heat up and wear faster. i am running Courser MSR 265/75/16 and am not having any problems carrying 1500lbs of salt in the back and the plow on but when i replace them this fall it will get 10ply tires in the same brand and style, these things grip extremely well but they do wear a little fast due to the soft tread. my opinion is if you use the truck as a truck run the max pressure in them or their rated minimum. i know some people may dis agree with this but purchase tires based on what you will be using the truck for and you won't have any problems. I am in no way suggesting you add or remove pressure i'm just stating what worked for me.
     
  15. tuney443

    tuney443 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,847

    First of all,a taller,narrower tire,all things being equal will always get better traction in snow[or mud for that matter] than a wider tire.The tire placard on your door sill is only for recommended pressures,pressures for the OEM size tire that will keep you safe and offer a decent ride up to the manufacturers maximum psi.I would much rather adjust my pressure to suit me for the loads I think I'll be carrying and somewhat for ride harshness and tire wear.Right now my 265/75's have 70 psi front and rear
     
  16. cascade powder

    cascade powder Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Beg to differ...put that tall skinny tire in bottomless snow and you will wish you had huge wide tires with hardly any air in them! Tall and skinny is great when you can dig down to more solid ground.
    Airing down will always help traction...by air'd down I am talking 8-12psi.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    Most of us on this forum are plowing snow, so we are always digging down. Furthermore, running 8 psi with a 4,000 lb spreader in the back is not going to be so good on the highway.
     
  18. tuney443

    tuney443 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,847

    I was referring to general driving in snow in the
    Winter.I know all the benefits of airing down if absolutely necessary.
     
  19. mpriester

    mpriester Senior Member
    Messages: 404

    i'm looking at the graph and lowering pressure definitely gives a larger print from the tire but look at the actual pressure the tread places on the ground as pressure is decreased.
     
  20. yardguy28

    yardguy28 Senior Member
    Messages: 485

    in my opinion i don't think airing down is good for the overall tire or wheel.

    i get fine traction in all conditions maintaining the same psi all year long.

    my tire currently is a fatter tire. its a dodge truck and it's a 20" tire but it's fat. i maintain 45-46 psi all year long, whether i'm plowing snow or driving in the 90 degree summer heat.

    under deflated tires are not good for the tire, wheel or vehicle. just read your manual.