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Your thoughts about a survey question

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by KissMyWake, Dec 21, 2010.

  1. KissMyWake

    KissMyWake Junior Member
    from indiana
    Messages: 26

    I was recently asked to take an industry survey and a question was presented that i took issue with. I am wondering if anyone else sees any problems with this question. The answers were multiple choice and zero is not an option although, i don't know ,is.


    A hypothetical question: How much salt (untreated sodium chloride as a de-icer) would you use per acre in a normal 2-inch (5 centimeter) snow event of average moisture content?


    I would appreciate your input . Thank you
     
  2. forestfireguy

    forestfireguy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,276

    There are so many possible vairables, what is a "normal" storm anyway??? I'm not completely sure of what they want. BUT to read it, I'd guess since they say as a de-icer, they mean post plowing (I'd never do salt only on a 2" storm). But to answer the question the way I read it, I'd go around 1,000lbs for an acre.
     
  3. me!

    me! Member
    Messages: 31

    i saw the same question in i assume the same survey. im not sure who would ever try and melt 2 inches of snow so i answered it as didn't know.

    Scary thing is they claim to be the leading organization for snow and ice removal.
     
  4. coldcoffee

    coldcoffee Senior Member
    Messages: 776

    I would make a note as to the evasiveness, or lack of criteria within the question. Texture/weight of snow, air temp/ground temp, sunlight/overcast/night time, wind speed - blowing & drifting, to be effective for that hour or to last for 12, was it plowed first & is their any more precipitation to follow? Otherwise, the question would have to be answered with the worst case scenario, which would be unrealistic by most standards of operation.