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Would a 3/4 or 1 ton truck be better?

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by NYH1, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. NYH1

    NYH1 Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    I'm looking at getting a new truck. It's going to be my work truck as well as my daily driver. I'm going to go with a new '13 or '14 crew/ext. cab short box, gas engine, 4x4, auto trans. (limited slip/locking rear diff., tow & plow pkg.) I'm not sure if I sure go with a 3/4 or 1 ton? Price wise there about the same. With gas engines their towing capacities are about the same. Their payload capacities are higher in the 1 tons. I will be hauling stuff in the box, but I don't think I'd over load a 3/4 ton.....I don't think.

    I'm going to use the truck for plowing and towing trailers. My regular trailers won't weigh more then 4-6,000 lbs. so they're not really a lot. Although I'll most likely be towing daily in the warmer months, so I guess the stress of day to day towing can add up over time.

    I'm probably going to go with a Fisher or Western 8 1/2 ft. plow. I'll be doing a lot of residential plowing so I can't go to big. The last two winters here in Central New York have been real mild. Some years have some pretty bad winters here with some serious plowing. I want to make sure I get a truck can handle everything I'm going to use it for. Would it be worth getting a 1 ton just to have a heavier duty truck?

    Thanks, NYH1.
     
  2. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,971

    go with the 1ton. only issues you could have would be the gvwr not sure how ny does there ratings but that could force you into getting dot numbers and all that good jazz
     
  3. goel

    goel PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,079

    Plan for tomorrow not today.

    Get the 1t since its similar price.

    You can always under load a 1t easier than overloading a 3/4t.
     
  4. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,971

    Under load a 1 ton.....never
     
  5. NYH1

    NYH1 Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    I'm going to get stuck with the DOT crap whether I use my current 1/2 ton. Or get a new 3/4 or 1 ton truck once I hook my trailer up to them and use them for business purpose. In New Yorkistan if the trucks GVWR is over 10,000 lbs. OR if the truck AND trailer GCWR is over 10,000 lbs. and you use it/them for business you have to put DOT numbers and the business name on the side of the truck.

    GCWR's are calculated by adding the two (truck and trailer) GVWR's together, not the actual weights that you're carrying/hauling in them at the time.

    So if I use my current 1/2 ton truck for work with it's 6,700 lbs. GVWR and my trailer with it's 7,000 lbs. GVWR, together they have a 13,700 lbs. GCWR. I'd be over the 10,000 lbs. GCWR so I'd have to put DOT numbers and my business name on it.

    I'd probably have to stop at all the DOT truck stops and weigh stations too. Now I'll have to see if I'll need different insurance altogether because of this. This should be fun.

    NYH1.
     
  6. Whiffyspark

    Whiffyspark 2000 Club Member
    from SOMD
    Messages: 2,402

    I thought 10000 pounds and under no need for dot numbers. You can have a 9,999 truck and a 9,999 trailer and not need numbers
     
  7. NYH1

    NYH1 Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    If you're not using it for business purpose in NY anyway, weight doesn't matter. At least not in a pickup truck.

    If you're using it for business once the trucks GVWR is OVER 10,000 lbs. "OR" the truck AND trailer GCWR is OVER 10,000 lbs. you need DOT numbers and business name on both sides of the truck. It's not the weight you're carrying or hauling at the time. It's the weight that your truck or truck and trailer CAN carry/haul.

    It may be different in other states. I just looked into the New Yorkistan regulations.

    NYH1.
     
  8. tuney443

    tuney443 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,847

    Most states now conform to the FMCSA rules for the 10K lb.DOT tags so that means if your rig is applicable,then ALL the rules of the FMCSA apply to you--truck stops,pre trip inspections,drug testing,etc.,etc.If you can prove you're a ''hobbyist'',NOT hauling to make money in ANY way shape or form,you are exempt from this but remember Officer Dickface will probably argue this so keep a copy of the FMCSA's regs on this in your ride.Also,if only the trailer puts you over the 10K lb. threshold,when you're not hauling the trailer you DO NOT need DOT tags so if you're concerned about owning up to DOT scrutiny,cover over the DOT placard with a blank magnetic strip or something else.
     
  9. NYH1

    NYH1 Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    I could probably get by with my half ton truck and setup a trailer to keep my truck/trailer GCWR under 10,000 lbs. just stay away from the DOT BS. I just don't want to plow with my half ton or buy a new half ton to plow with. I don't want to kill them, when a 3/4 or 1 ton truck will handle a plow better.

    NYH1.
     
  10. Blizzard1980

    Blizzard1980 Senior Member
    Messages: 186

    As of July 5th, 2006, DOT rules apply to trucks with trailers that have a gross combination weight rating ( GCWR) greater than 10,001 lbs.
    Learned it the HARD WAY. Actually, i was awere of it but acted as a dumb blond and played stupid. oh-well
     
  11. NYH1

    NYH1 Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    Only if they're used for business purposes, we mentioned that above.

    Thanks, NYH1.
     
  12. Blizzard1980

    Blizzard1980 Senior Member
    Messages: 186

    You are correct. Sorry for skipping on comments. I should really follow thread all the way before dipping my nose in honey..:laughing:
     
  13. SMiller

    SMiller Member
    from IN
    Messages: 46

    I just ordered/received my 3500 single rear wheel, same price as the 3/4ton, why would you not get the 1ton? You also get the overload springs as well as the AAM 11.5 rearend that the Duramax gets.
     
  14. NYH1

    NYH1 Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    One reason I'd go with a 3/4 ton over a 1 ton is to be able to cover up DOT numbers when not towing a trailer as tuney443 mentioned. The last thing I want to "have to do" after a long day of hunting or just doing whatever. . . . .when not working, is have to stop and deal with the DOT. There are 2 major interstate highways and 2 other highways in and around the area where I live. With State Police and DOT all over the place, not just on the highways. Not having to deal with them every time I drive would be a big plus.

    I'm looking at GMC/Chevy's and Ram's. For 2014 both gas and diesel Ram 2500's get the AAM 11.5" rear end. They also get the new front end that the Ram 3500's got last year along with the new 6.4L Hemi option. Just don't know if I'm crazy about the new coil spring setup rear suspension in the Ram 2500's. That being said, I prefer a solid front axle over a IFS setup. So I guess if I don't get a Ram 3500 (solid front axle and rear leaf springs), I'm going to have to figure out which compromise I'll except.

    They all seem to have their pro's and con's from my point of view.

    Thanks, NYH1.
     
  15. SMiller

    SMiller Member
    from IN
    Messages: 46


    Are you 100% positive that the Ram 2500 has coils instead of leaf springs in the rear? I think you have that backwards!

    Lots of solid axle vs IFS debates but needless to say the IFS has proven itself!
     
  16. NYH1

    NYH1 Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    I'm positive. Ram 2500's have had a solid front axle with coil springs for a while. Now they call it Three-Link coil spring front suspension (3500's have it now as well). New for 2014, 2500's have a Five-link coil spring rear suspension with AAM 11.5" rear end. 3500's still have rear leaf springs.

    That may be the case. However, I prefer a solid front axle setup if possible. Kind of partial to the Hemi too.

    That being said, I really like the size of the 2013 GMC/Chevy's 2500/3500HD extended cab, short box 4x4, they're about the perfect size for me now. There's a dealer close us that has a GMC Sierra 2500HD EC SB Work Truck, 4x4 w/tow & plow pkg. that has everything I need. We've looked at it. If it's there when we're ready to buy, which we hope it is, we're definitely going to check it out some more.

    NYH1.
     
  17. jmac5058

    jmac5058 Senior Member
    Messages: 428

    Is this a work truck ? If so its a no brainer , a Chevy 2500 max payload 4,212 lbs a 3500 is 7,222 the ride is the same empty the cost is not a 3500 costs more but not much.
     
  18. cubplower

    cubplower Senior Member
    Messages: 182

    Definitely go with the 1t if you have the option. It is easier to overload a 3/4 ton than you think
     
  19. NYH1

    NYH1 Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    Actually none of your numbers fit any of the GM trucks that I would buy. I'm looking at Ext./Crew Cab. Short Box 4x4 6.0L V8 gas engine trucks. Not DRW trucks.

    From GMC/Chevy's web sites-
    Ext./Crew Cab. Short Box, 4x4 2500HD- 3066 lbs. max payload, 9400 lbs. Max Conventional Trailering, 3.73 gears, 13,000 lbs. Max Conventional Trailering 4.10 gears.

    Ext./Crew Cab. Short Box, 4x4 3500HD- 4190 lbs. max payload, 9,100 lbs. Max Conventional Trailering, 3.73 Rear Axle, 13,000 lbs. Max Conventional Trailering, 4.10 Rear Axle.

    Payload isn't my reason for wanting a HD pickup truck. My main reason is plowing first and towing second. I'll be putting stuff in the back of it. It won't be loaded like most guys load them though.

    Thanks, NYH1.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013