1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Work Light's

Discussion in 'Strobe Lighting' started by plowmaster07, Apr 28, 2010.

  1. plowmaster07

    plowmaster07 Senior Member
    Messages: 438

    Hey there Guys. First of all, sorry if this isn't in the right spot. But I think it's close enough.
    Anyways, I am going to be getting a back rack for my 96 dodge this summer. And I want to go only kinda crazy with the lights :) . I am going to be getting 2 http://www.code3pse.com/productdtl.jsp?grp=pse&familyid=13&id=80 or something like that for the ends of the rack. I may remount my mini light bar up there as well. But I want to mount up 4 off road/ work lights/ flood lights, or whatever you want to call them. I am going to have 2 facing front and spread at an angle outwards, and the same thing with the ones in the rear. I am also going to be mounting some flood lights (4x6") in the new bumper I'm going to have made up.

    I am wondering who has any recommendations for work lights. I'm looking at these from auto zone, http://www.autozone.com/autozone/ca...atts+Tractor+Light&brandName=Pilot+Automotive . I saw a different pair and now I cant find them!. oh well.

    But what are your thoughts, who makes good work lights that you guys like?

    Aaron
     
  2. Too Stroked

    Too Stroked Senior Member
    Messages: 555

    A lot depends on what you want to do with the lights, or said another way, what you want the lights to do for you. If you simply want to fill an area relatively close to the vehicle with light, a “flood” style utility light will do just fine. Beware though when you try to use something like that mounted up high for seeing where you’re going in a snow storm. This type of light tends to reflect back off of the snowflakes and blind you. After much pissing and moaning by one of our loader operators, I actually mounted a set of Hella 550 (driving beam) lights next to the floods on the roof off a separate switch. When it’s really coming down, he now shuts down the floods and can actually see what he’s doing because of the more defined beam pattern. Oh, and he can use them with the floods to see much farther out.
     
  3. wkahler

    wkahler Senior Member
    Messages: 250

    It also depends on your budget..........I personally like LED lights, simply because there is no relay involved and the you can stick them anywhere with out any extra wiring except a switch. The only down fall i have with mine are they don't get hot enough to melt snow off of them, but i only have them set up right now for reverse lights and going to be putting them on my spreader next year. They make up to a 1400 lumen with a flood, spot and a trapezoid pattern on them so you can do whatever you want to with them as fare as shooting light out in any way. I always go for the more expensive lights, but that seems to be my pattern in life with my toys, after all that's what we are all in this for is the bigger,better, brighter toy right?!?!? I have two 500 lumens on the back of my truck.
    http://www.soundoffsignal.com/indexpages/white-illum/worklights_index.htm
     
  4. plowmaster07

    plowmaster07 Senior Member
    Messages: 438

    They look like pretty decent lights. What did you pay per pair if I may ask? The lights are primarily going to be used during a snowstorm. And also during the off season.
     
  5. plowmaster07

    plowmaster07 Senior Member
    Messages: 438

    I like the idea of the LED lights too. Simply because there is less amperage draw on the battery, versus the traditional lights. My only thing is, does the beam shoot out as far as a traditional light does? What did the 500 Lumen's run you for price? I initially like the look of the 1400 lumen's. As far as a budget goes, I'd like to keep it under $350.00. I maybe able to spend more on it as time goes on, but that's my initial budget.
     
  6. Too Stroked

    Too Stroked Senior Member
    Messages: 555

    I think we paid something like eighty bucks for the set - which included the lights, wiring, relay, switch and all. (Nice kit.)

    One caution I might add though is that generally speaking, the higher up you mount the lights, the farther out one can see. Working against that is the fact that you also get more glare. I didn't have too many choices on mounting locations on the loader. I almost went with pencil beams since the operator's main concern was that he couldn't see far enough ahead of him. (Pencil beams are harder to find.) They would have given him the distance - with minimal glare. Up close he was fine. So, a driving beam was a good compromise between distance, mounting height and glare.
     
  7. wkahler

    wkahler Senior Member
    Messages: 250

    I think they where somewhere in the $60-$70 range, not sure though its been almost 8 months ago. I deal with Safety Lighting on the board here, he is great and will give you the best price out there as fare as comparables with other sites. I tend to by from guys off here if they have what i want and also to help out the local crowd a little!!
     
  8. bigbadbrad

    bigbadbrad Senior Member
    Messages: 835

    here are my back up lights 4 driving beam lights, 25 bucks a set from VIP they work good, i also have 2 hella twin beam lights on top of the rack pointing forward for plowing at night, i dont have a pic of them on the truck, just of them lit up

    edit: wrong pic in the first one, but those are the same lights as my back up lights, just after my dad got done plowing in his plow truck, he tried to go threw the trees as you can tell by the branches he tore them right off the truck

    pictures 014.jpg

    light1.jpg

    light2.jpg

    light3.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2010
  9. bigbadbrad

    bigbadbrad Senior Member
    Messages: 835

    here are my back up lights

    back.jpg

    back2.jpg