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Winter tire pressure

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by mcwlandscaping, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,557

    I am running Cooper Discoverer E Rated 265-75-R16 tires on my truck, what tire pressure would you recomend to run to help support the weight of the plow, now that it is colder out, i'm not worried about the tires getting hot and the pressure increasing. Ride quality is not a big deal to me, it's a truck, i don't care! lol Thanks for any help/advice!
     
  2. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    When you have the plow on, run the front tire's at the max recommended pressure that's posted on the sidewall. Depending on how much ballast you carry in the back you also want to run the rear's at or near the max pressure also.

    I'm curious though, you run the tires at a lower press in the summer for fear of them increasing in press and blowing out? Why? Tires are designed for the increase in air pressure as they get warmer. That's why the psi spec on the sidewall specifically states "max cold psi" on them. They know they're gonna increase in psi as they increase in temp. Most guys run lower tire press to help ride quality, not to prevent a blow out..

    Are you aware that a tire build's MORE heat due to being under inflated? They're much more likely to blow out due to under-inflation than over-inflation.

    Just curious on your thoughts....
     
  3. ABES

    ABES PlowSite.com Addict
    from MN
    Messages: 1,322

    i dont mean to hijack this thread but im running my tires at max psi right now... does the psi relate to how fast the tread wears??? i dont tow or haul a lot but the tire shop told me that when i do i should bump them up 10 pounds or so in the rear..
     
  4. gcsupraman

    gcsupraman Senior Member
    Messages: 110

    I usually run 60 psi in all 4 tires for the winter but have run 50 psi during severe ice conditions A good rule of thumb is to run the lowest pressure that is safe with your workload. Unless you have a full size sander, I would never run 80psi in the back. When running higher pressure you will not only sacrifice ride quality, but traction as well.

    -Greg
     
  5. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,557

    oh wow, that makes A LOT of sense!!! I always thought it was, that's what the max pressure should be no matter what! Thanks so much
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2007
  6. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Got it and already sent it back...:waving:
     
  7. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,557

    Sent you another one, lol, then i think i should be all set with this!!!!!
     
  8. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Got that one and sent it back too...wesport
     
  9. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,557

    got it!! didn't send one back, i should be all set!!! thank you so much, i'll let you know how it goes :)
     
  10. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Yes it definitely can. If your running the truck empty most of the time you can try different pressures to see what works best. Generally you want an even "foot print" across the entire tread with the weight that your carrying to get the maximum tread life from the tire. You can drop the press down until an even foot print is achieved access the tread but be careful not to go too low in the front on a heavy truck.You need enough press to carry the weight without building heat in the tire.