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Winter tire for trailer?

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by doubleedge, Nov 12, 2010.

  1. doubleedge

    doubleedge Member
    from ND
    Messages: 64

    I occasionally have to use my 16' tandem axle (1 axle has brakes) trailer to transport an atv (perhaps a sub-compact tractor this year) and snowblowers from job to job. I didn't have any problems last year, but I would still like to prevent any problems from happening this year.

    So, I am considering putting a pair of snow tires on the axle that has brakes. In particular, firestone winterforce tires. Tire Rack says that they (size 205/75r15) are rated for 1598 lbs each, which is only a couple hundred pounds less than a regular trailer tire. Considering that the trailer will weigh less than 3000 lbs with the atv, which is only ~750 lbs per tire, the snow tires should hold up, right? Or aren't passenger vehicle snow tires recommended for use on trailers?
     
  2. heather lawn spray

    heather lawn spray PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,206

    As far as I've been told you never put passenger tires on a trailer. Find an experienced tire dealer for the explanation, something about the stiffness of the trailer tire sidewalls and the twisting and loading that a trailer under goes. Trailer tires are listed with the code letters ST in the tire size. P is passenger tire. LT is light truck
     
  3. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    Basher will likely chime in. ST or LT are the best choices for a tandem trailer.
     
  4. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    OK sure, yes the ST or LT are your only choices and if it is a 7K rated trailer definitely the ST. Trailer tires are much different that auto tires. They are designed to FOLLOW they never have lateral load or acceleration forces. I would choose Bias ply tires for your application, they track truer and are less effected by tire ruts that roads develop. You say you only have one axle brakes. Front or rear axle?
     
  5. doubleedge

    doubleedge Member
    from ND
    Messages: 64

    The brakes are on the front axle, I believe.

    I did some research on the internet and most sources say that passenger tires are able to handle 10% less weight than the sidewall rating says when used on a trailer.
     
  6. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    They also do not track as well and are more susceptible to sidewall failure during tight turns. automobiles do not constantly slide a tire during turns, Since they have no grip requirement except braking you will not see any improvement in trailering. If you want to see an improvement in braking add brakes to the rear axle.
     
  7. bighornjd

    bighornjd Senior Member
    Messages: 249

    That was my first thought as well. I would spend the money to have brakes on both axles before worrying about what kind of tires are on it, assuming the tread isn't worn too bad. Trailers aren't designed to perform well in the snow with poor road conditions. That's just all there is to it. Towing and snowing don't mix well.