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Who uses a 3500 dump 2wd

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by LawnjockyS, Feb 10, 2010.

  1. LawnjockyS

    LawnjockyS Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    I got a great deal last year on a 2009 2wd Chevy 3500 with a dump bed. At the time I thought I wouldn't plow with it so I didn't need 4X4. After looking at it just sitting on the lot for two winters I'm starting to wonder about putting a plow on it. I know I would need to beef up the front end and load it with a ton of weight but would it work ok when I got done? I figure on a 7.5' blade with wings and I would just be plowing big flat parking lots. I use 3/4 4x4 trucks with 800lbs in back now. I know what happens in those trucks and I can't get past the concern of spending a bunch of money on this truck just to find out it wants to sit and spin. Does anyone use a setup like what I'm thinking and hows it work?
    Thanks
     
  2. saintsinner84

    saintsinner84 Junior Member
    Messages: 27

    i don't know how good a 7.5' blade will work. i have a 2006 3500 w/dump body and they said i needed at least an 8.5' blade to cover the dually's at full tilt. but then again maybe the wings will make it wide enough.

    and i find myself plowing alot in 2wd, i have 1ton of salt as balast. and most of the time i have no problems. but most of my sites do have some areas where 4wd is a must.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2010
  3. jb1390

    jb1390 Senior Member
    Messages: 710

    I would say that I do 80% of my plowing in 2wd. If you have flat stuff-you will hardly ever need 4wd. I can even plow up a decently steep hill in 2wd if it isn't too heavy or deep. I also run a 1000 lb spreader often times with 2000-3000 pounds of material. If you could also swing for a spreader and throw that in there, with the dual wheels that would be a nice machine. If you have enough work for multiple vehicles, just split up the tough stuff where you know 4wd may be needed.

    Get at least an 8 foot with wings, preferably a nine foot. A power plow would be nice.
     
  4. LawnjockyS

    LawnjockyS Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    I was wanting to use the 7.5 plow because that's what I have on the other trucks. That way I can stock the same parts for all the trucks.

    Good thought on the width. With wings it should just barely cover the tires. I need to measure to be sure but I had a 90 something chevy dually that had a 7.5' with wings and it worked. I remember it having a lot of traction problems and it was 4x4 with 800 lbs in the back. That truck is what makes me think the 2wd won't work at all. But the weight issue you guys are talking about is what makes me wonder if it could work. Also the smaller plow would help offset the traction problems. I use bagged salt loaded on a pallet now as my ballast. I think a full pallet is 1.25 tons. That would be concentrated weight right over the drive wheels. Not spread out over the whole bed.

    The big lots I do, and all of them in my town, are pretty flat with only a slight slope for drainage. Big flat open lots are what I have in mind for this truck. Even so, a 6-8" wet snow could be a real bite.

    That Power Plow looks real nice. I have used Meyer plows for years and they seem to suit my needs. Most of the guys in my area use Meyers or Western.

    Thanks for the input. Spending a couple of thousand dollars on a bad idea is almost always a bad day for me.
     
  5. snobgone

    snobgone Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 122

    If you can, put a spreader in it. The weight will give you the traction you need as mentioned above. We have run a 3500hd (15kgvw) 2wd for years with a 3 yrd spreader and it works great. We plow with it on one of out zero tolerance accounts and it does well because we are keeping up with it. It slips a bit with heavier accumulation. Why not, you own it....it should make you some $!
     
  6. clark lawn

    clark lawn PlowSite.com Addict
    from NE ohio
    Messages: 1,233

    mines a ford dump but it is 2wd you will need a 8.5 blade to cover the duals and at least a ton in the back. i put a V BOX in the bed and fill it up and it will push anything, at least on parking lots. i only do a few drives with it if they are flat and straight then i will do them. just use your head and dont get yourself in a place were you can get stuck.
     
  7. LawnjockyS

    LawnjockyS Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    Thanks for all the ideas and encouragement. It really is bothering me more and more that truck just sitting there not making me any money. I also forgot to mention that for the last several years we don't get a lot of snow events. And when we do 2" is the norm. with a big snow at 4-5". I know my help would like to see me get a spreader. I just use hand push spreaders now, always been to cheap to get a tailgate or box.
     
  8. jb1390

    jb1390 Senior Member
    Messages: 710

    Out of curiosity-what parts would you expect to be different between the 7.5 and 8 foot (or 8.5, 9 foot) plows? What brand are you running?
     
  9. saintsinner84

    saintsinner84 Junior Member
    Messages: 27

    only things that i can think of would be mould board, cutting edge and possibly different trip springs.
     
  10. LawnjockyS

    LawnjockyS Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    I am using Meyer's with E60 motors and I think the blades are called standards. My blades were all bought in the early to mid 90's. We just chip, paint and rebuild every so often to keep them in good shape. The cutting edge is the first item that comes to mind. I don't use the skid shoes so we go through cutting edges faster than others. I don't know what else would be different but I would guess not much. If I put a blade on it will be another old one to match the others. When I need parts I have to order or drive to another town to get them. As a result I stock pretty much one of anything the plows might need at 2am in the morning or the next day. Most of what goes wrong just needs a new part and 10 min. to fix. The rest of the time it's just very convenient to have it on the shelf ready to go. If Meyers or one of the other brands would do a trade in program I would consider updating but until then I prefer to stay with what I know.
     
  11. jb1390

    jb1390 Senior Member
    Messages: 710

    Cutting edges and moldboards don't tend to go bad at 2 in the morning unexpectedly. If they do, you just hit something really hard and have more to worry about than a cutting edge. Get an 8.5 footer with the same pump. All your crucial parts will be swappable.