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Wheel loader questions

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment' started by xtreem3d, Aug 30, 2011.

  1. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    Maybe looking to get a wheel loader of some sort. Alot i have looked at have over 9000 hours..is that considered alot? That might be a stupid question but based on the skids i own that only have from 800 to 2000 hours ..... 9000 plus seems like alot but maybe they spend alot more time idling and not necessarily are hard hours? Do you guys that own wheel loaders normally have trucks and trailers big enough to haul them yourselves?
    Steve

    Here's an example http://www.machinerytrader.com/listingsdetail/detail.aspx?OHID=7541193&
     
  2. Brian Young

    Brian Young PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,382

    WOW that seems like a lot to ask for a 1985 w/ 11hrs on it. We bought our first loader last year and it is a 99 Dresser with about 5k hrs on it. We picked it up for 23k and it came with 4 new tires, new glass, a full service and additional lighting installed. I'm not too experienced in the world of front loaders but def. seems way too much to me. I get a magazine every so often and the last issue we got had a 94 CAT IT28, new tires, new paint, full service, heat/a/c and (I think) around 7,000 hours on it, it said everything was tight and ran great, bla, bla....the price was mid 20's. I think I stole ours but you can find a newer clean machine in the same price range for sure.
     
  3. IDOCTORTREES

    IDOCTORTREES Senior Member
    from MONTANA
    Messages: 792

    I just bought a case 621d with 2000 hrs for $50.000
     
  4. buckwheat_la

    buckwheat_la 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,254

    I am not familiar with that brand of loader, but I can tell you this, without even knowing who you are, or what you are doing with the loader. I highly doubt you need that big of a loader. Actually I am quite certain you don't. Now I am making a big assumption.....that you want to use this for snow, if you are working a gravel pit, or heavy excavation then this loader is probably good for you. But that fact you are on here asking the questions you are tells me you probably aren't doing heavy excavation or dirtworks. So as far as advice, look for a older John deere, Case, Cat, or even Dresser loader. Look for wear at the pivot point, and at the hydraulic lines. Also look for recent engine work, if a loader has over 10 000 hrs chances are it has had a engine overhaul at some point, if it hasn't, make sure there are no engine problems. Beyond that, look at dealer support. I hope this helps you out
     
  5. Brian Young

    Brian Young PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,382

    Yeah looking back at the pics that bucket looks like a 3-4yrd if not bigger. The problem is when you go to buy a pusher, most USEFUL sizes of pusher will only be rated for a 2-2.5yrd bucket. Unless you are looking to buy a 18-20ft or more pusher, thats kind of a big machine.
     
  6. buckwheat_la

    buckwheat_la 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,254

    Did you ever read last winter when Kcress was talking about putting a snow push on his 988cat? Thing was HUGE!!!
     
  7. Brian Young

    Brian Young PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,382

    Yeah I think I remember that. Wasn't the bucket alone like a 6-8yrd bucket or something.
     
  8. buckwheat_la

    buckwheat_la 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,254

    Yeah, or even bigger, I wonder if he ever did anything with it? That would be a sight seeing the local Walmart being done with something like that....impractical as hell, but would be a sight
     
  9. Brian Young

    Brian Young PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,382

    IDK, I could use that on a lot we do. It would be awesome to make maybe 3-4 passes and your done,lol.
     
  10. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    Thanks for the informative reply......i guess your absolutely right ..i don't need a loader that big. i based the listing on what i could get in my price range. in other words buy the biggest one i could get for the money. Since i'm new to looking at wheel machines i don't know all the specific model numbers yet . Would something like a Volvo L30/L50 be a better size for a 12-14 ft pusher? ( that's my pusher size range) Can you basically equate loader hours with skidsteer hours as far as wear and tear?
    Steve
     
  11. buckwheat_la

    buckwheat_la 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,254

    I definetly wouldn't equate a skidsteer running hours as the same as a loaders. Here is the deal, loaders as a rule are made to run for a long time, they are designed for heavy work, and the engines are there to handle it too. Not many people truely use a loader to its limits, therefore, IMO there are lots of loaders out there that aren't really worn at all, for very reasonable rates. A L30 is way to light for what you are doing, the L50 is more in line, for a 12/14 ft pusher, a John Deere 444 might do what you are looking for, a 544 would definetly do it no problem. Case 521 would also be a decent choice, as would anything Cat between a 920 to a 930. You are looking for a machine in the 100 hp range, with a weight around 18 000lbs, keeping in mind that it is the weight of the machine that well keep you moving on a long push, otherwise your wheels just spin trying to push a load.
     
  12. buckwheat_la

    buckwheat_la 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,254

    Keep in mind too, the newer/bigger the machine, the less common it likely is, therefore the more costly parts and repairs are going to be on the machine. I have used lots of loaders on farms, and when I needed one for snow removal, I looked for something that was in good repair that was a common/popular loader. When I bought my 910, it had 11 000 hours, with only 1000 hours on a rebuilt engine and it had a drive train service. Checked over everything and negotiated it down to $15 000. It goes a decent highway speed, isn't much for creature comforts, but is small enough to get into tighter spaces, while still pushing the hell out of my 10ft push. I was careful in how I selected my machine for my needs. And the fact that it is older is a great asset, very little electrical to go wrong in it, and a very easy machine to work on. I am looking for another one this year, as well as a slightly bigger one that I can put a 14 ft push on.
     
  13. mow 4 u

    mow 4 u Member
    Messages: 42

    I have a John Deere 644B for sale. Good glass 70 percent tires tight pins and resent service. 9600 hrs 4.5 yd bucket $16500 obo
     
  14. Brian Young

    Brian Young PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,382

    Like Buckwheat said....HP and weight are the big things. Our Dresser is a 510C which has103HP and weighs around 17k lbs. It has trouble pushing a full 12ft box of snow long distances (over 75 yards or so). A guy I know has a CAT something or other and both machines are about the same size but his weighs around 21k and his will probably move more snow longer distances.
     
  15. StuveCorp

    StuveCorp Senior Member
    Messages: 341

    My first loader was a 621B that was used in a sawmill as a forklift and had almost 14,000 hours yet ran great, it was all original. I used it for two years and had very little downtime, the worst problem was fuel gelling which wasn't the machines fault. I did trade it in as it did leak some and I wanted a newer machine. A higher hour machine isn't bad, especially if you can get all of the maintenance history for it. As for size, stick with the 2-3 yard loaders. I like the 621's(Case) the best but Deere, Cat or Volvo wouldn't be bad, just depends on dealer support.