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Vplow for driveways?

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Heavy Snow Man, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. Heavy Snow Man

    Heavy Snow Man Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    I have seen a couple guys around town use them and I know they only advertise plowing drives.
    Do any of you plow drives with a Vplow?To me that's alot of extra money to spend for something you really don't need or am I missing something here?
     
  2. LHlandscaping

    LHlandscaping Junior Member
    Messages: 21

    I have a few residentials that I plowed with my vee. Can't say that I think it's worth the extra weight and $ to only plow a run of the mill suburban driveway. However, if you ever do any commercial lots they are the only way to go.
     
  3. Heavy Snow Man

    Heavy Snow Man Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    Your right,and you never know when one of those commercial lots mite come your way.
    Guess I wasn't thinking about that.
     
  4. kl0an

    kl0an Senior Member
    Messages: 215

    This past winter I used both a V-Plow and a Straight plow, both Fishers.. I'll put a straight plow on my truck for next Winter.. Those Vee's were a real pain to deal with.. Hard to tell if they were straight until you got to the end of a run and realizes the right side was back a bit and it let all the snow slip off that side..

    Give me a straight plow with one wing.. oh, and a Daniels back plow..
     
  5. ratlover

    ratlover PlowSite.com Addict
    from IL
    Messages: 1,325

    Never had a problem telling were my wings were? Although the fishstick is kinda a PITA to use compared to the boss for a V. But the boss full trip V tends to not trip and this is hard on plow/parts/head.

    They do shave time but enough to make it worth it doing the kind of plowing you do??? Depends what you do and what the lots/drives look like. I always go with the its better to over kill things than be wishing I bought something else later approach.

    Pull plows are killer for drives or any were you have to back drag much. Depending you may be ahead to spend the extra $$$ on one of those. Or get a straight and one of those if $$$ is tight. Depending on what you will be doing.....

    I love my V but stick to pretty much all comercial
     
  6. kl0an

    kl0an Senior Member
    Messages: 215

    We were running Daniels pull plows behind those Fisher Vees and also the Fisher straight blades.. If I do get set up with a truck this Winter, I won't think it's complete until I get a Daniels on the back.. Those things save SOOOO much time.

    I actually had a client stop me in the parking lot telling me how great a job we did because we scraped down a lot better than plowers using just blades or vee's.. The Daniels made the difference there.

    I have to agree with ratlover, spend the extra money on a back plow. I'd say that's more important than a vee..
     
  7. ratlover

    ratlover PlowSite.com Addict
    from IL
    Messages: 1,325

    I wouldnt say get a back plow regardless. It depends on what you will be doing. If you will be doing lots of drives(like I think you will be doing right? or no?) or loading docks or places were you do much backdraging then go for it. The few places I have done drives or docks one would have really been nice and done a better job and done it quicker. But for most of what I do a back blade would just be extra $ and lenght off the back end of my truck. Like I said I do mostly bigger com and we lay down salt so a back blade isnt right for me IMO. Does mean less ballast in the bed though.

    If you can do something small and get a slight time savings then look at the amount of $$$ made over the life of the piece of equipment or upgrade. Some guys say 25% increase over a straight but I think that depends on the type you will be doing. When you think in terms of this will shave a minute or 2 here that means over the storm that minute or 2 could be another acount. A minute dosnt seem like much but it can add up. Thats were it pays to spend the $$$ to be more efficient. Plowing snow is about being efficient and getting it done before the other guy pushes it(meaning your client wouldnt wait for how long it would take you to get there, you want your stuff cleared in a reasonable amount of time, the more stuff you can clear in that set reasnoable amount of time that the last one would have to wait the more $$$ you make) Or incase of those late or early storms you need to be able to push it before it melts LOL
     
  8. PLOWMAN45

    PLOWMAN45 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,835

    I will take a pull plow or a large driveway its good for busting through heavy snow and what not
     
  9. Heavy Snow Man

    Heavy Snow Man Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    I will be doing mostly drives and maybe a few commercial now that a few people found out I am going to plow.I will check into those back blades.Thanks.
     
  10. ratlover

    ratlover PlowSite.com Addict
    from IL
    Messages: 1,325

    I'm sure you have heard this many times but as a start up dont forget the insurance;)
     
  11. Heavy Snow Man

    Heavy Snow Man Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    Thank you sir,got the insurance all taken care already.
     
  12. 04superduty

    04superduty PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,354

    I love my v blade. i can get into tighter spots with in in the scoop position. It does add more weight though. i plow mostly commericial and only have 3 drives. the drives are all tight and i cant windrow the snow to either side. I have to carry it to one end. that is the best part of a v blade. i also feel that i can stack snow higher.
     
  13. chris k

    chris k Senior Member
    Messages: 204

    Got a Fisher V a couple of years ago. Won't ever buy a straight blade again. We do both res and comm. Best money ever spent.
     
  14. derekbroerse

    derekbroerse 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,377

    I have a Boss V-Plow on my truck.... can't say I ever wondered what position my wings were in either--thats the point of having the little rubbery stick thingies hanging off the ends lol.

    I had to plow with a Western Straight Blade for a partial day last year when the distributor failed in my truck (Western was mounted on a tractor) and what a PITA it was compared to the Boss. For the record I have the standard joystick control, not the fancy handheld one.

    My feeling would be if you intend to do residential ONLY and never plan to deviate from that plan, get a straight blade. However, if you ever plan to move on to commecial or industrial jobs, or if you have a lot of curving driveways where the snow cannot just be 'winged' off the side, consider a v-plow.
     
  15. salopez

    salopez Senior Member
    Messages: 873

    here is my question on the v-plow. is it easier on the frame when plowing a drive in the v position? this is what i have been told, just trying to figure it out.
     
  16. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    I'd think the stress on the frame would be the same whether it was in scoop, straight or "V". Stress to the frame is based on the weight applied to the hinge points. That would stay the same as the weight distribution will still the same distance from the hinge points. Like you holding a bucket of water at arms length. The stress so your shoulder is the same whether you hold the bucket in front or to your side (it may feel like there is some relief due to shifting position, but that is psychological, not physical).
     
  17. ratlover

    ratlover PlowSite.com Addict
    from IL
    Messages: 1,325

    When in the "V" position it tucks the weight closer to the axel so it acts lighter IMO. I know you can tell a big difference with the blade up in the scoop position. The blade acts alot heavier.

    Also easier to manuver in traffic since you dont have to worry about angling it back and forth for clearance.
     
  18. kl0an

    kl0an Senior Member
    Messages: 215

    When it's in the scoop position, it's taking all the weight of the snow and pushing it, when it's in the V, the excess snow is sliding off the sides..
     
  19. ratlover

    ratlover PlowSite.com Addict
    from IL
    Messages: 1,325

    I'm talking when the plow is raised traveling. There is a definate difference with the blade in the V position as apposed to the scoop or even a noticable difference if it is flat.

    When its on the ground it dosnt matter one way or another other than like you said its having a hrader time pushing snow if its scooped. I thoght he was talking transport and such.

    JMO but pushing snow isnt hard on the truck/frame. Its when you hit stuff like cracks or bumps or the like. Thats why i went with the fisher V. It trips better in its differnt positions than a Boss. The "shock" factor will be the same with any plow(considering equal tripping)

    I also dont think a V blade is any easier on a truck(frame rear suspention ect) even though it is easier to push stuff in the v position. The differnce in strain is marginal to the truck. I would say thay pushing deep snow that in the V position is easier on the trany though and alot easier to keep from getting stuck. Scooping(pushing more weight) would be harder on the trany but IMO thats about it that would be noticable.

    Edit: Do I make sense? Basicly I am saying if you arnt hitting obstructions the only thing pushing more or less snow will hurt is the trany. This is if your running a 12' box blade or a snow bear. Transporting= lighter is better in terms of front end life, this is were the V has some advantage IMO, in the V position the weight is closer to the axel giving it less leverage. So if you had a 900# straight blade on a truck it would act heavier than a 900# V blade in the V position. But V's are by design heavier than a straight......
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2004
  20. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    It just stills seems to me that the weight (mass, force etc) on the frame would be the same, regardless of what position it's in. That applies to tranport, like was pointed out. Pushing snow would create different forces, depending on positioning, weight of the snow etc.