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Unusual Plow Setup Question

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by New2Snow, Dec 20, 2008.

  1. New2Snow

    New2Snow Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Hello all. I work in Readymix concrete and have always had this thought floating around about setting up a mixer for pushing snow and spreading salt. I work for a small company now and might actually have a shot at getting something setup. First things first though, has anyone seen or know any manufacturer that makes a spreader that could be mounted to a RM Truck and have salt/sand put into it by the chute? I'm thinking in my head a hopper setup open at the top that is being continually fed by the material in the drum. This setup would probably only be used for large municipalities, possibly sub contracted to the state. If setting one up is impossible, then there is no need in searching any further.

    Thanks for your help in advance
     
  2. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    That would be sweet if you could get something rigged up on a truck. Is it a rear dump or a front dump?
     
  3. New2Snow

    New2Snow Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    We have all rear discharge mixers here. We have 5 trucks that are tandem axle with Allison automatics that I am thinking about off the top of my head. We have everything onsite to load the trucks through the plant and have about 400 + tons of sand on hand all the time. All we would need to do is setup a bin for salt and we are good to go. We can hold about 20 ton of material in the drum, possibly more that would always be agitating and away from moisture. If I can find something similar to a hitch spreader, but larger, I think that would work. Also thinking about putting numbers together for setting up a salt depot also. We have a bobcat and 938 Cat to load trucks, obviously the sand and can setup salt storage very easily. We also have 5000 gallons of Calcium Chloride on hand.
     
  4. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    I'm guessin they are the two chute models
     
  5. New2Snow

    New2Snow Junior Member
    Messages: 8

  6. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    yep, spent quite a few days shovin a chute around, now I am spoiled by front dumps
     
  7. speedy

    speedy Senior Member
    Messages: 104

    It's a unique idea, but in practice, probably a dismal failure. The plow probably isn't the biggest issue, you've already got a helluva central hydraulic system. Most plow guys would think they'd died and gone to heaven with the hydraulic flow that a mixer has. If it's set up like most single steer, tandem drive trucks around, then the height of the front bumper is one obstacle, albeit minor.

    Then there's the distance it sticks out, assuming you have a crankshaft-mount hydraulic pump. That will add more cantilever- weight effect to the front axle. Then there's the big tires - no good on snow and ice, but if you've driven the truck in winter delivering mud, you already know that.

    The sand will likely freeze in the drum, if not there, then it'll freeze in the funnel and chute. Then there is all the swirling snow that will stick to everything at the backend.

    The bearings in the rollers at the back of the drum need to be constantly turning, or the rollers will get punded out. Then there's the problem of them freezing up, and they get flat spots worn in them.

    As for rigging up a secondary hopper to receive the sand, then spread it.....how many decades is this experiment supposed to take to pay off???

    Better off sticking to hauling concrete in a mixer truck. IMHO
     
  8. New2Snow

    New2Snow Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Yea, heard that front discharges are nice. Any ideas on designs or where a rig like this might be useful like larger parking lots, etc?
     
  9. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    maybe you could mount a box pusher on the front of the truck, with a lift system ran off of the drum hydraulics. but I am sure you would have to fill the drum somewhat to give you weight for traction. Probably would use stone, so it could easily be discharged out, where sand could possibly freeze. but mounting a spreader on the end of the first chute could be an option, but I don't know how the truck would discharge sand in cold, wet possibly real nasty weather
     
  10. New2Snow

    New2Snow Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    All the hydraulics are behind the cabs, not if front of the bumper like old styles. I don't have much problem driving in the snow especially with the power divider and differential locks engaged, nothing like a 4x6 with mudslinging tires on it :) . I through this idea out to someone else a long time ago and they said it had been done in some of the northern states. I don't know, just seems like a waste of equipment to be sitting around. As far as the rollers and sand issue if the drum is constantly turning, either in charge or discharge the material will be continually mixed and the friction should help freezing and clumping issues. I hauled concrete yesterday and it was 5 degrees with the windchill and nothing froze up, well maybe me when I had to get out and clean the damn thing.
     
  11. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    old man first seen front dumps in 78 in wisconsin, but back here in ohio, fronts weren't common till the late 90s. Now about half of the companies around here have them, but the bigger companies keep rears around for big pours and paving
     
  12. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    hot water and 2%??
     
  13. New2Snow

    New2Snow Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Nope just hot water. Guy was pouring in a cave here, always a nice 68 inside. Still got to get there without everything freezing up, and they won't let us wash inside.
     
  14. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    Thats nice, I hate even washing my tools this time of year, let alone gettin soaked washing a truck down
     
  15. New2Snow

    New2Snow Junior Member
    Messages: 8

  16. New2Snow

    New2Snow Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Would a Western 2000 spreader work well for spreading the material a good distance? I'm sure I could rig something up to mount it fairly easily.

    Or a Snowex 1875 possibly, it says it can handle sand or sand/salt mixtures very well.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2008
  17. Rc2505

    Rc2505 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,245

    My thought on this would be to look at a trailer, to pull behind the concrete truck. If you switch your thinking that way you could look at something more like a dump body tailgate spreader. I have one on my truck and if I crank it all the way up I must throw salt close to 45 feet wide. Maybe my pump is a little bigger than need be, but I would have to think you could rig something up that way. I think the spreaders you have mentioned would be to small to even think about, the hoppers only hold about 700 pounds. With a trailer set up you could build it to fall right into the spreader, and hold 1 or 2 thousand pounds.