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Under-Hood Pump w/ Electric Clutch

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by tvpierce, Oct 21, 2003.

  1. tvpierce

    tvpierce Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 209

    Has anyone ever tried adapting an A/C clutch to a Fisher/under-hood pump? It seems like a great idea in theory – you can run the pump only when you need it, and don’t have to remove the belt in the summer. The two most obvious variables/obstacles are the shaft size and shaft length (for clearance).

    Your thoughts?

    Jeff Pierce
     
  2. Big Nate's Plowing

    Big Nate's Plowing PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    you can buy a regular clutch pump for a central hydraulics system from northern for <$350

    [​IMG]

    heres the link
    linky
     
  3. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Like Nate said,it's easier to buy one.

    A regular automotive AC clutch may not have enough holding power to drive a hydraulic pump.Shaft sizes aren't even close either.

    You don't need a fancy on demand clutch pump for a snow plow setup.Just get a cheap hydraulic pump,just enough to run the plow,and bolt it on.If you don't want to pull the belt in the summer,you don't have to.It should still last you many years.
     
  4. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    It was actually offered on the belt drive minute mounts with electric valves.

    Fisher also made a pulley with a bearing in it and a removable pin. In the summer you could remove the pin the the pulley would not turn the pump. Have not been made in a while but the "pumpmate" still can be found.
     
  5. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    A little knowledge can be dangerous

    Yup, perfect pump IF you want central hydraulics. But what tvpierce was talking about was a Fisher pump with a built in reservoir and about 3 GPM capacity. To go with that central pump and give you a workable system you need a tank bigger than 20 gallons (to keep fluid temp. down), and a flow reducer so you don't move the plow a just a little under light speed. Then there's the minor item of hoses and such to make all that 20 or so GPM go where you want it.

    There's a little more to it than "See how smart I am, just buy this pump".
     
  6. Big Nate's Plowing

    Big Nate's Plowing PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    that pump can me geared to put out as little as 2-3 gpm, 1200 pump rpm gets you <5gpm I dont know where you pulled 20 gpm from:rolleyes:
     
  7. Crash935

    Crash935 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,377

    Dont forget the valves.... someones got to tell the oil where to go..
     
  8. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    By Gawd, you are right!

    I'm sorry, but only by a little. I didn't realize the smallest pump in that ad was that low an output. On the other hand you didn't look quite far enough on the list to see what the other pumps put out. It's only the bigger pumps that move oil enough for a central system, mine is rated at 19.4 GPM at 2,000 RPM.

    But, I don't know how you would "gear" that pump down without some really small damper pulleys. And maybe you know a place to get them but otherwise that could be some pricey hardware. Add that to your $350 figure. Additionally, those pumps are pretty large, would be a bunch harder to tuck one under a pickup hood than a Fisher pump. Again,, it can be done, all you need to do is apply money.

    Crash 935, I didn't include the valving as you would need that with the Fisher pump as well.
     
  9. tvpierce

    tvpierce Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 209

    CT18fireman and Alan are in line with what I was thinking. I was aware that Fisher offered the pump sheave with the bearing & pin, but I didn't know they offered an electric clutch -- interesting.

    I asked the question because the electric seems like a slick idea, and A/C pumps are readily available for peanuts in junk cars, and very reasonably priced even at auto parts stores.

    Wyldman brings up a good point in that you'd have to be sure the A/C clutch could provide enough pressure to spin the hydraulic pump. (I have no idea what kind of resistance either pump creates -- does anyone else?)

    As Alan pointed out, assume you have a complete working system -- Fisher in this case.

    But it's all a mute point if you can't make the shafts mate. I think that would be the biggest obstacle.

    Thanks for the input.

    Jeff Pierce
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2003
  10. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    If you had machining equipment it would be easier. I am not sure of the availability of the Fisher clutch parts. I see them in catalogs. I think the whole pump is different, with a seperate resevior, then the older pump Fisher used. Maybe the Fisher rep will chime in here.