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UltraMount straight blade about 2011 control issue?

Discussion in 'Western Plows Discussion' started by Easy Outs, Jan 20, 2016.

  1. Easy Outs

    Easy Outs Member
    Messages: 36

    2011 GMC 3500, 7'5" straight 3 plug UltraMount

    I hooked my plow up for the first time today prior to the incoming storm. Handheld control lights up as normal. At first nothing worked and all I got was clicks under the hood. After playing around a little I made it lift. Then it would turn as normal. It lifts and turns fast when working. However, I keep having issues where the plow is not moving when it should and all I get are clicks. Do I need a new controller, or should I check something else?
     
  2. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,977

    I'd look at the solenoid first.
    Might not hurt to just replace it
     
  3. RepoMan207

    RepoMan207 PlowSite Fanatic
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,035

    Solenoid under the hood, either you have a loose connection to a corresponding wire, or it's failing. Trace all the connecting wires and make sure they're all plugged in or attached securely. If they're all in good order, get a new solenoid and make sure it's installed exactly as it is now or follow this diagram...










    .




    relay.jpg

    relay.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016
  4. Easy Outs

    Easy Outs Member
    Messages: 36

    Thanks for the help and suggestions everyone.
     
  5. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,574

    ^Noting like a looming storm to make it a crises.;)

    seeing as it's intermittent.
    if there are any bugs or dirt
    clean the plug with contact cleaner.
    inspect the pins for good contact.
    do not apply dielectric grease.

    looks for any loose or damaged wires.
     
  6. Easy Outs

    Easy Outs Member
    Messages: 36

    Why no grease? I've usually been told to use it on connections.

     
  7. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,574

    As its a insulator, it inhibits the floe of electricity.
    I know, so many fawn all over the stuff as
    it's mis-prescribed regularly by folks who should know better.
    fyi



    "Dielectric grease is a non-conductive, silicone-based grease that's designed to seal out moisture and prevent corrosion on electrical connectors. It also disrupts the flow of electrical current, which makes it good for lubricating and sealing the rubber parts of electrical connectors. It's commonly used in automotive spark plug wires, recreational and utility vehicles, and electrical systems in aircraft. Dielectric grease is widely used as a sealant for spark plugs in gasoline or diesel engines, as well as on the gaskets of multi-pin connectors in the electrical systems of vehicles and boats. When used with spark plugs, it's applied to the rubber part of the plug wire. This helps the boot slide onto the plug's ceramic insulator and keeps dirt or moisture from contaminating the seal and disrupting the electrical current."



    Try NO-OX-ID "A-SPECIAL Electrical Grade"
    http://www.sanchem.com/electrical-contact-lubricant.html

    NO-OX-ID "A-SPECIAL Electrical Grade" is the electrical contact grease of choice for new electrical installations and maintenance. NO-OX-ID electrical contact lubricant is an electrically conductive grease that keeps metals free from rust and corrosion. This electrical contact grease has been used in the power industry for over 65 years to prevent corrosion in electrical connectors from low micro-power electronics to high voltage switchgear. NO-OX-ID A-Special is RoHS compliant!

    Click here to download more information about NO-OX-ID "A-SPECIAL Electrical Grade"

    NO-OX-ID electrical grease prevents the formation of oxides, sulfides and other corrosion deposits on copper, aluminum, and steel surfaces and conductors. The purpose of an electrical contact lubricant is to prevent corrosion and lubricate the connection for easier maintenance. NO-OX-ID "A-Special" electrical grease prevents corrosion attack on all metal surfaces. Attack can come from battery acid, salt, moisture and various industrial chemical vapors in the environment. When this conductive paste is used on aluminum connectors in joints, NO-OX-ID "A-Special" prevents the reformation of oxide films, which cause high resistance and subsequent failures.

    NO-OX-ID A-Special conductive grease is recommended by connector manufacturers for trouble-free joint connections. When nuts, mounting bolts, and cotter keys are coated with NO-OX-ID "A-Special", they will never rust or freeze assuring you easy, trouble-free removal. NO-OX-ID "A-Special" should be used wherever the formation of a corrosive product will affect the proper functioning of the metal surface. This electrical contact grease is easily applied, easily removed, and gives long lasting reliable performance even on dissimilar metals.
     
  8. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,977

    You can use a small amount. Just don't overdue it like most people do
     
  9. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,574

    Only On the seal,
    Not even a littel should be applied to the connection.
    Why apply a insulator after you just cleaned off the stuff/dirt that was acting like a insulator?

    It's the wrong applacation for dielectric grease.
     
  10. mishnick

    mishnick 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,243

    The grease should be put on after a good, tight connection is made. As for the clicking.... Put a test light on the motor terminal and then hit up / left or right. If the light comes on but motor doesn't turn replace the motor. If test light does not come on move backwards to the truck side plug until you get a light. Most likely the grill plug or the solenoid / motor relay.
     
  11. Easy Outs

    Easy Outs Member
    Messages: 36

    I went and bought the relay/solenoid. However, now it's working fine again. I'm thinking it must have been something in a connection somewhere but I'll keep the solenoid on hand in case it comes back.
     
  12. Western1

    Western1 Senior Member
    from MI.
    Messages: 679

    Why not put the new solenoid on now instead of maybe in the middle of a storm?
     
  13. Hysert

    Hysert PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,272

    I put a new solinode in are plows every 2 seasons, lots of amps running thru them everytime you hit button for movement.. $40 is cheap insurance to eliminate an issue!!
     
  14. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,574

    Why replace a working part just befor a storm?

    I carry a spare solenoid.
     
  15. Easy Outs

    Easy Outs Member
    Messages: 36

    It seems easy enough to swap out if it becomes a problem again. It is easily reachable in this truck.
     
  16. mishnick

    mishnick 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,243

    You still don't know if the problem is the solenoid. Could just as easily be the grill plug. Would be a drag if you changed the solenoid in the middle of a storm only to find that wasn't the problem.
     
  17. Easy Outs

    Easy Outs Member
    Messages: 36

    Yes, but its working fine at the moment with the existing solenoid so changing it to another one that works won't guarantee a solution now. If it starts doing it again and I change it and that fixes the problem I will know it was or wasn't the problem.

    I'm going to monitor it throughout the day tomorrow and up until the snow hits to see if it does it again.
     
  18. mishnick

    mishnick 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,243

    Keep a test light with you. When it fails again see if the test light lights up on the output side of the solenoid. If the system just clicks but the test light comes on then the solenoid is NOT to blame.
     
  19. snowbuster1

    snowbuster1 Member
    Messages: 81

    I had the same issue when I hooked up Monday night. I just unhooked Saturday and all it did was click at solenoid. It ended up being the power connection cable at the grill.
     
  20. Philbilly2

    Philbilly2 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,633

    I have always wanted to have that argument about that the dielectric grease is an insulator and that grease has no conductive property's... guess I missed out on it... stupid work always get in the way...

    Is that what people are paying for them now? Have not bought one in a few years as I am still working threw my stupid stock pile... I thought they were like $12 still????