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tractor vs loader

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment' started by fireside, May 18, 2009.

  1. fireside

    fireside Senior Member
    Messages: 661

    I'm looking at expanding my services again this year. The big question is what is the benifit of a tractor vs loader? I haven seen pictures of tractors with pushers and plows run off of custom frames. The tractor loaders all seemed removed why is the loader arms removed? Nobody in this area use tractors for anything other than loading salt or plowing sidewalks.
    I use a skidsteer(6600 lb) and a mini loader (9200 lb) one runs and plow the other a pusher with no problems but they are shorter runs. I have current excellent customer i do who bought two new properties located next too each other. both accounts are large open lots total area i'm not sure. Pushs around 250' to 400'. The accounts are mine if i want them he likes are service no problems or worries for him. I just want to make sure i provide him the same service level he gets now!
    what size weight range tractor
    horse power range
    operational costs per hour tractor vs loader
     
  2. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    When you say tractor, do you mean like a farm tractor? I would think for just snow removal, a loader would be better. You don't need PTOs or all those gears.
     
  3. fireside

    fireside Senior Member
    Messages: 661

    Yes i would say a farm tractor. At this time it would be only for snow but you never can tell that could happen. I have my eye on a JD 444 with only 2100 snow hours. It's a one owner unit complete maintance records and fully serviced. I'm just wondering what's the benifit of a tractor. I have read about many people in canada with them and swear they are better but never give any reasons why.
     
  4. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    I would think that would be a good machine. Does that have the rear wheels that steer, along with the frame articulation? What year/letter/horsepower? What are the tires? I have heard that radials are big money, but well worth it on snow. The 344 or smaller has the tighter turn radius, and is a real asset for snow removal.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2009
  5. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    Cheaper to purchase and operate
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2009
  6. JohnnyRoyale

    JohnnyRoyale 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,935

    Because they're cheap horse power. You could get 2 tractors for the price of one loader.

    Both are equally effective for clearing snow

    Personally, I would opt for a loader to load trucks or push backs, but thats jmo.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2009
  7. fireside

    fireside Senior Member
    Messages: 661

    I thinks it's a JD E444 year 87 or 88. it's just an center articulating loader only. The machine is in great shape stored indoors almost all year round. They currently run a 12' pro-tech pusher with no problems. I was thinking maybe i could get a new tractor for the same money or a little more. I just need to make sure it will due the same job
     
  8. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    If I could buy a used loader or new tractor for the same money, its a no brainer. I would buy the loader. Sounds like the machine is well cared for, and is proven in the snow. That nice high seat gives good visibility, and the transmission is designed for non stop back and forth. Less hit on depreciation if you decide to sell it. Don't forget you need to put a nice heated hard cab on the tractor. Are you mechanically inclined for service and such?
     
  9. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    Huh?

    Why would you but a 20 year old loader over a brand new tractor (with warranty)?

    Where is JD when we need him?

    It must have finally dried out enough for him to get in the feilds
     
  10. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    Actually not that hard to put a cab on a tractor, we put them on all of ours. Do you have any knowledge of tractors at all or are you just amusing us?
     
  11. blowerman

    blowerman PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,261

    Now Dave comes out of the wood work... The new Belarus tractors work good for snow?
     
  12. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    :gunsfiring:Feisty!:angry:

    I have some knowledge of tractors. My thinking is if I could by a new Canyon pickup, or a used one ton for the same money, I would buy the one ton. Sure they could both move snow, but the bigger truck is going to work easier, and depreciate less quickly, especially up front. I understand that repairs and maintenance may be higher, but that's OK for me personally. A machine that is made to load gravel all day long should last quite a while pushing snow. And you could probably get every penny back in two years if you didn't like it or had to sell. As for the cab installation, I was thinking about cost, not difficulty.

    Just my opinions
     
  13. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    That isn't even a similiar comparison, besides iron doesn't depreciate like trucks


    Tractors come with cabs from the factory these days;)

    2 year old farm tractors (especially green) with low hours are worth every penny and then some of what you paid for it

    Why would you be OK with higher repairs and maintenance ? :confused:
     
  14. Cat Man 77

    Cat Man 77 Member
    Messages: 69

    I have a question what is your budget for this? I also prefer wheel loaders because they sit up higher and are more maneuverable because of the center articulation. Also with a loader it is easier to move piles and stack snow. JMO
     
  15. blowerman

    blowerman PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,261

    Which loaders are you comparing? Why would a (wheel) loader sit higher than a tractor?
    For that matter, they are all "loaders". You need to compare speed, bucket size, area that you are working (how tight), and brand to get a true idea on benifits and cost of a specific machine. :drinkup:
     
  16. Cat Man 77

    Cat Man 77 Member
    Messages: 69

    Generally wheel loaders have a higher seat height and greater visibility. Just my opinion.
     
  17. RLM

    RLM PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,270

    It depends on what your looking for/at. The large articulating tractors sit up every bit as high as a wheelloader. I have never used a tractor for pushing snow but if you do a search & research it, you'll find plenty of guys that swear by them. Look under user names, JD dave, & redman???? both have posted plenty of info. Google chase enterprise & check his as well. Tractors for one are geared for pusing/pulling whereas wheeloaders are set up to lift & carry materials. Knowledge is every thing, take the time to educate yourself to make a smart decision comparing apples to apples as to which better suit your needs.
     
  18. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    Well said. I will add that if I had to load snow I would pick a wheel loader but if I had to push it I'd pick a tractor. when I talk tractors I'm also talking 100 hp and up. Also the cab thing was a joke, I've never actually owned a tractor without a factory cab. Tractors are not a new thing around here for pushing snow, my dad started plowing malls back in the early 70's and we've been doing them ever since. We actually have owned a JD 544 but we found it was cheaper and more productive for us to use tractors. Keep an open mind, in the long run it will make you money.
     
  19. fireside

    fireside Senior Member
    Messages: 661

    budget is around 50k. With the snowfall we get here i have not moved any snow in 7 years.
    I do need the option to pile the snow when we plow. I currently use a skidsteer and mini loader to pile as they plow two lumber yards. Could i leave the loader on the tractor and mount the pusher as normal or does it need to be removed? Leaving the loader on would allow me to stack snow with the pusher as we plow. I would like to use a 12' pusher max so we could use it on all the accounts if needed.
    Tractor weight vs HP they seem to be much lighter than loaders of same HP. So what size tractor weight and HP would i need to look at to run a 10' to 12' pusher.
     
  20. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    You really havn't pushed for seven years?:eek:

    You can mount the pusher to the loader bucket or to the bucket coupler, either way it would only take a couple of minute to change from pusher to bucket

    I would say for a 10/12' pusher something the size of a 6000 series Deere would be the ticket