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Towing w/ F250 or F350- CDL Required?

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment' started by ARP, Mar 5, 2005.

  1. ARP

    ARP Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    I was to purchase a used F250 or F350 diesel and tow with it either a drop deck equipment trailer or a dump trailer rated at 14- 16,000 lbs. (GCVWR at approx. 20- 24,000 lbs) for a skidsteer business- would I need a CDL to operate this rig?
     
  2. plowed

    plowed Senior Member
    Messages: 344

    Yes, to pull any trailer with a GVW above 10k lbs, even with a 250/350, you will need a Class A CDL.
     
  3. ARP

    ARP Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    thanks plowed
     
  4. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

    no,as long as you are not grossing over 26001 lbs.
     
  5. GSE

    GSE Senior Member
    Messages: 108


    Actually, you can drive anything under 26K with a standard MV operators license. Anything over 12K you need a medical card, renewed bi-annually. To tow anything over 10K, regardless of the combined weight, you need a CDL-A.
     
  6. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

    not to get in a pissing contest,but i would suggest you re-read the regs,especially the part where it says any combination of vehicles with a gross weight rating of 26001 or more provided the trailer being towed is rated over 10,001.This means you can pull a trailer rated to 20000 with a Yugo as long as you are not grossing over 26001.
     
  7. 04superduty

    04superduty PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,354

    go to your local DMV, secretary of state or what ever they call it and ask them. here im MI you need a shoufers(sp) license to tow anything over 10,000 lbs, but still under the 26,000 lb GCWR.
     
  8. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

    I think some confuse a class A license with a class A cdl.For example,the state of NC has both.You need a class A license to pull a trailer over 10001 lbs. regardless of gross rating provided you are exempt from other CDL requirements,however,you are required to have a CDL only if the vehicle being towed has a rating of 10001 or more AND the combination is rated over 26001.http://www.ncdot.org/dmv/driver_services/drivershandbook/chapter1/typesLicenses.html
     
  9. GSE

    GSE Senior Member
    Messages: 108

    Like anything else, these things vary state to state. I know in NH you need a CDL-A to pull a trailer greater than 10K, regardless of the towing vehicle....
     
  10. SnoForce

    SnoForce Junior Member
    Messages: 27

    By the way this is not the full Class A license (tractor trailer) you need a restricted Class A ( trailers over 10,000 lbs.)
     
  11. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

  12. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

    show me where you came up with restricted class A,and what are the requirements
     
  13. SnoForce

    SnoForce Junior Member
    Messages: 27

    http://www.marylandmva.com/DriverServ/Apply/licenseclass.htm

    If you look at the class codes (A, B, C ) only Class A can pull trailers over 10,001 lbs. Now if you go down the page to the restriction codes you will see the code "O" which means you are restricted from driving tractor trailer. Hence the restricted Class A. And yes CDL licensing is the same state to state in the USA. John
     
  14. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

    You are correct about the O restriction,but only as it relates to class A CDL requirements.ARP does not meet the basic requirements for needing a CDL because of the 26001 gvwr.The O restriction would apply to someone that is already required to have a class A CDL,such as a dump truck operator pulling a dozer on a tilt top trailer.
    The 26001 gvwr and the 10001 trailer weights are not either or,they are both requirements for needing a class A CDL.You are also correct that CDL requirements are uniform from state to state.Thats why I don't understand the confusion.This subject pops up here and on other sites about every week.Here is a link to the DOT site that will explain everything.....http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/safetyprogs/cdl.htm
     
  15. echovalley

    echovalley Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 456

    What it comes down to is check with the DMV in your own state.Your single wheel 250 is not going to last very long pulling that kind of weight.In CT u MUST have a CDL A to pull a trailer over 10001[even if some of u guys want to try and use your garden tractor].I think this site is really turning into a site more for homeowners,and ham n eggers.
     
  16. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

  17. echovalley

    echovalley Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 456

    Hey do u even have a CDL?
     
  18. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

    I have held a Class A CDL for over 14 years.I have logged over 1 million miles as an OTR truck driver the first 12 years of that period.The last 2 yrs. i have scaled back my driving to concentrate on my own business.I have driven for SWIFT Trans.,FWC trucking,Dan-Valley foods and Overnite Trans.I have been to every state in North America except for WA,OR,MT,and ID,have crossed scales in every one of them and been inspected at one time or another in most.
     
  19. echovalley

    echovalley Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 456

    Well only a million miles in 12 years, maybe it was more local work,but anyway.No one ever worked for me,or moved any of my machines or drove any of my CDL trucks without a class A or B.
     
  20. bsnead

    bsnead Junior Member
    from zone 7
    Messages: 13

    Why would they?You state that they are CDL required trucks so then they would require CDL Qualified drivers.I don't understand your statement.If the vehicle does not fall under cdl requirements,then neither does the driver.

    What kinds of trucks and trailers do you operate?
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2005