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Tough estimate..

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by PLM-1, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. PLM-1

    PLM-1 Senior Member
    Messages: 424

    ok guys...help me out...i'm sorta new at bidding.

    got a call from an old lady for snow and ice control.

    the drive way is a HUGE horseshoe practically str8 up hill with a garage turnaround at the top. and here's the kicker...it's all stamped concrete! Is the s/c a problem? does it tend to act like a paver drive if you catch it right.

    the drive is a total of 5000' feet 2 car width and a 60' x 100' turnaround in front of a 4 car garage.

    on ice control i was thinking $18 product and labor.

    thanks guys...
     
  2. djd427

    djd427 Member
    from NEPA
    Messages: 98

    I would stay away from it with a steel edge. I do alot of stamped concrete and the corners chip right off. I have stamped designs in my own driveway,,,, I use the blower where the stamping is. Just my opinion though.
     
  3. empire

    empire Member
    Messages: 35

    stamped concrete

    Yes it will chip very easily and also DO NOT PUT CALCIUM PRODUCTS ON IT!! IT WILL EAT AWAY THE CONCRETE FINISH.......! :eek:
     
  4. chris k

    chris k Senior Member
    Messages: 204

    I would recommend a rubber cutting edge. A company I worked for years ago used them on a 3/4 mile long driveway that was brick.
     
  5. PLM-1

    PLM-1 Senior Member
    Messages: 424

    thanks guys...keep them coming!

    what do you all think about pricing? should it be more for the "risk factor"?
     
  6. Mdirrigation

    Mdirrigation Senior Member
    Messages: 408

    If they have a 5000 foot long stamped conctete drive way ,2 cars wide , use a rubber edge and charge them a lot . Around here stamped concrete is going for $ 12 sq. ft , Do the math . Aslo have them sign a damage waiver , if they wont , I wouldnt plow it .
     
  7. djd427

    djd427 Member
    from NEPA
    Messages: 98

    I would consider having her sign a damage release form. 2 snow customers of mine I actually stamped there walks and patios. I had them sign one and I only snowblow or shovel them. It is impossible to fix once damaged without removing. I will take a picture of my front walks and post it. I used a large 2 stage thrower a few years back and the feet chipped it in a few spots. It is very,,very expensive to replace. We charge anywhere from $10.00- 16.00 a square foot
     
  8. PLM-1

    PLM-1 Senior Member
    Messages: 424

    thanks for you recommendations! my contract has the waiver in it. At $10/sq ft, this would be a REALLY expensive job! The only equipment i have (or will have) are my truck and Grasshopper with a blade.
     
  9. pbeering

    pbeering Senior Member
    Messages: 266

    Get a polyurethane edge and apply something like magic salt or treated sand SPARINGLY. Highlight the waiver.

    We do lots of this sort of drive and have had very good experience with u-edges and Magic.

    We also provided a plastic pail of Magic Salt. We charge to refill it. We spend time with all our accounts who have hills or steep driveways and essentially train them to pre-treat.

    See http://www.sarbek.com/ice_snow/plow_blade_edges.shtml for info on the edges we use.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2005
  10. Mdirrigation

    Mdirrigation Senior Member
    Messages: 408

    The sq footage price is to do the stamped concrete , not plow
     
  11. PLM-1

    PLM-1 Senior Member
    Messages: 424

    I was gonna say... :eek:
     
  12. pbeering

    pbeering Senior Member
    Messages: 266

    For your bid, seperate the deicing. Some days you'll need more than others.
     
  13. djd427

    djd427 Member
    from NEPA
    Messages: 98

    If you do end up doing the job, talk to her about re-sealing it in the spring. Not only will the sealer help for next year, but it will hide any chips that are in it from this year. We usually reseal every other year.