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Touchpad-Floating Overload

Discussion in 'Meyer / Diamond Products Discussion' started by Patssfan, Oct 16, 2008.

  1. Patssfan

    Patssfan Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Hi, maybe someone can help.

    I read a couple of threads on here regarding this. I have an e57.

    When in float, the overload trips about 30 seconds after the plow is down. I have lubed the the three coil wires with conductive grease and lubed the inside switch connector as well.

    I've read about possible short circuit somewhere. When I took the coil off, there was no cracks that I could see. I also used fine steel wool to clean the base surface of the coil and a bit of the 'A' cartridge base also. I also coated with a thin layer of the conductive grease. No go.

    So is there any other spots, I should be checking for short circuits. Maybe the firewall mounted solenoid?

    This is on a 94 Ranger. I am about to have the pump flushed and filters cleaned and will most likely at the same time have a new 'A' coil installed.

    Any other ideas I can try. I ran this for about 3-4 seasons with out a problem. The problems just started at the end of this past season. Now getting the plow ready, the overload trips every time it goes into float. The plow has NO problem coming down up or sideways.

    A local dealer suggested maybe the electronic controller might be at fault.

    There is also a ever so slight creep down. Hardly noticeable, however last season one time, the plow would not hold at all and would come straight down. After a few tries it was fine.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.
     
  2. wheelmanm80

    wheelmanm80 Member
    Messages: 30

    if its only doing it when the blade is down and in the float position, it makes me want to think there is a short in the touch pad. i would check all you electrical connections for shorts or corrosion then have the touch pad tested/replaced.
     
  3. AHammen

    AHammen Member
    Messages: 47

    I would have to agree with wheelman, sounds like a bad touch pad. As far as the plow slowly creeping down=A Valve or sump base. If your taking it in for service have them check the A valve stem and "O" rings.
     
  4. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    The interminent leak down is cause by the A valve sticking partially open...either from contamination or just the spool sticking inside the valve body. Replace the A valve.

    If you have the square shaped A coil then that is likely whats causing your overload problem. Those plastic square design coils have been a problem since they first came out and will cause this exact issue when used with the touch pad style controller. You need to switch it to the older round metal style coil.


    So replace the square design coil with the old style round coil along with the replacement A valve and you should be good to go. wesport
     
  5. Patssfan

    Patssfan Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    B &B, actually I have the round style.
     
  6. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Good but it can still be causing too much resistance for the TP. These TP's are very, very, sensitive to excess resistance in the circuit.

    Change the A valve to fix your leak down issue.

    Change the A coil.

    And also double check the orange ground wire in the control harness to be sure it's clean and has a good connection as this can also cause an overload condition. Should be either on the neg batt terminal or one of the mounting bolts for the under hood solenoid.
     
  7. Patssfan

    Patssfan Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    One question, I was reading about the orange ground on another thread. I am assuming you mean the orange in the 6 pin white connector to the controller. Following the orange wire it leads to the 'Meyer' solenoid module wired into a connector plug 'B' (Middle). It is not grounded. The only ground to my battery comes from the pump unit.

    Keep in mind the plow worked fine for 3 years. I will replace the 'A' coil and cartridge and see if this does the trick.

    Not that this caused the issue, but I have continued problems since I bought the unit after year 1, with freezing up. I'd have to take a hair dryer or portable heaters to get the fluid flowing.
     
  8. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    That orange wire is for the plow/truck light toggle. If you do not have a second orange wire in the actual control harness then you likely have the older touch-pad and harness. Which in that harness the ground wire will be WHITE.

    Should go to the same grounding point(s) as I previously described. :salute:
     
  9. Patssfan

    Patssfan Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    B&B,

    Changed the 'A' coil, overload trip is gone. I will be installing the cartridge soon when I change the fluid.

    Question, is there any relevance to moisture being trapped in the system related to regularly changing the air venturi?

    I am trying to figure out why I have moisture in the system. I had a Meyer Dealer flush the system last season yet, I still had system freeze-up shortly thereafter in sub-zero temps.

    I plan on doing the fluid change myself this time around to try to eliminate this.

    thanks for the help.

    P.
     
  10. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Did they remove the lift ram/cylinder/tank assembly and clean the sump base out...or simply flush it assembled? Once you get water or contamination in one of these Meyer pumps it's virtually impossible to remove it with a simple flush due to their internal design. The reservoir/sump base has several nooks and crevices that trap the contamination in the bottom that will not be removed with just a drain and flush no matter what you do. While a drain and flush never hurts, once you suspect water intrusion/contamination you have to pull it apart (lift ram assembly/tank) and clean it out the old fashion way, which is a good idea with these pumps every few years regardless for good preventative measure. You'd be surprised at the amount of crud that comes out of one of these that hasn't been torn down for a thorough cleaning for a while. :nod:
     
  11. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    When you buy fluid spend the extra couple bucks for the OEM stuff. There is a differance.
     
  12. Patssfan

    Patssfan Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    B&B,

    I was afraid of that. I am a rookie. Is this just a matter of pulling the pump cap off, cleaning the bottom with brake fluid, reassemble and flush or does this actually involve pulling the assembly off the studs? Does the packing cup and piston arm need to come off. And I probably would want a new cap gasket, yes?

    I'd have the pros do this, but took the truck off the road. But I agree with others on this forum that it's a good idea to get some hands on experience.

    Is there a way that I can tell if the bottom has crud other than pulling it all apart? Would the crude be seen through the drain plug hole just as a quick indicator ( I doubt it, but thought I'd ask).

    Does anyone know the story with these air venturi's. A second dealer that I visited today tells me that this a number one part to check with regards to moisture getting in the system as the spring can get stuck. I realize that when the truck sits during the summer, the fluid will pick up or wick moisture in. The dealer suggested and recommended replacing this air venturi valve every year, since the part is only $8.

    Next year, I might fill the pump with flush during off season.


    Thanks in advance.
     
  13. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

  14. Patssfan

    Patssfan Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Thanks Basher,

    I meant to say Brake Cleaner.
     
  15. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Yes you'll need to remove the top cap, ram, and tank assembly from the sump base to get in there and clean the sump out. And yes you definitely want to replace any O-rings you disturb...wouldn't hurt to throw a new packing cup in there while you have it apart as well. Simply use the Meyer manual that Basher posted and take your time, it's not a hard job.

    Afraid the only way you'll see the bottom of the sump through the fill hole is with a bore scope :D , other than that you have to pull it apart.

    A fresh one once in a while isn't a bad idea but every year is basically pointless. It isn't the vent failing or being defective from age or use that causes water intrusion, it's the design of the vent itself thats the problem, along with the poor sealing around the lift ram. If the wiper seal and vent are not in tip top condition, they both allow water into the system.

    Can't believe Meyer still hasn't changed it in all these years.
     
  16. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    If you do that, run the piston all the way up, then top off the pump and spray it all down with Fluid Film.