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tires

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by martyman, Nov 29, 2001.

  1. martyman

    martyman Senior Member
    Messages: 281

    I did a search on tires and didn't see any thing. I was wondering what pressure I should use when plowing? exact pressure or a little hard or soft? I just purchased a set of new snows and I bought the standard size for my Jeep but I was debating if I should have gone a litte larger. Right now I use 235/75R15 and I was going to go upto say a 31" tire but the price was quite a bit more.
    Thanks for you comments Marty
     
  2. martyman

    martyman Senior Member
    Messages: 281

    Sorry guys I kept searching and I found that I should keep my tires harder for the snow and for the weight of the plow. But I'm still not sure about size differences. Marty
     
  3. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    I would stay with the stock size. This will prevetn "floating" which may occurr with a large tire footprint.
     
  4. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    I'd also stick with the stock size, you want the narrowest tire to bite through the snow for traction. I run at full sidewall pressure, this way you are getting the full weight rating of your tire.
     
  5. wolfie

    wolfie Senior Member
    Messages: 174

    This is something that's always confused me... if you are plowing the snow off the road in front of you then why do you need skinny tires to get down to hard road? I would think that would only apply if you are driving in deep snow not when plowing.
     
  6. DaveK

    DaveK Senior Member
    Messages: 420

    Keep them at max tire pressure. For the reasons pelican01 and CT18fireman stated above.

    As for tire size, changing form stock to a taller tire will cause your speedometer to be incorrect. Not by much, but it will, unless you change the speedometer gear as well. The gears are readily available for Jeeps from many sources. You will need to know the rear axle ratio, tire height and transmission when buying one.

    Also, (and I don't want to start a debate on this) taller tires will make your truck work harder since it changes your final drive ratio. Going from 235's to 31" isn't much difference in height but for each additional inch in height, the circumference is increased by approx. 3.14 inches.


    wolfie- very good observation. But since we do have to drive through snow to get from place to place.............
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2001
  7. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Wolfie,

    You'r tires aren't always following your plow when turning, you'll be in unplowed territory. Also you don't always scrape things clean on the first pass. I have a number of driveways that I have to drive in with the plow up and push the snow out.

    Less surface area of your tire print = more psi on the surface.
     
  8. martyman

    martyman Senior Member
    Messages: 281

    wow thanks guys for the info. Its hard not to want to go for larger tires when you read sites like Jeepsunlimited.com. I'm almost ready for plowing. I just have to make a new route map of my residentials and go for a test run. Last year was a tough one with my 4wd not working properly because of the vacuum shift arm on my front axle. I bought a cable unit that I bought via Internet and some shackles so I sit a little higher and some snow tires and I'm set.

    Marty
     
  9. DaveK

    DaveK Senior Member
    Messages: 420

    If you check into sites like jeepsunlimited.com or other ones enough. You will probably find that when going to over 33" tires, you may want to swap axles as well. This of course depends on which axle yours has. Not all axles are created equal. And the added stress may cause them to fail. I have seen a Jeep that had 38" tires with axles from a 3/4 ton Chevy.

    If you go with tires 2 inches more than stock, you may want to change the ring & pinion gears in the differentials to keep your engine in the optimum power range when going uphill or driving on the freeway. With a manual tranny, you could just shift later. They will also increase the torque on the axles, u-joints and drive-shafts. So it is usually wise to upgrade these. And bigger tires are also heavier. The increased mass and leverage from larger tires need more braking power.
     
  10. Kent Lawns

    Kent Lawns PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 315

    Without teaching my physics class here...

    Your goal is to maximize friction between tires and pavement.

    You do this by:
    Tire cuts, joints & sipes
    Soft rubber
    Weight
    Small footprint (puts down more PSI on the pavement, increasing friction.)
     
  11. wolfie

    wolfie Senior Member
    Messages: 174

    That makes sense... I've always used stock size mud/snow tires for plowing. In fact I have one steep driveway that I can't plow while going up but I can usually drive up it through the snow and plow on the way out. And sometimes I have to back up until I spin and then plow down and repeat this until it's done... so I guess I'll be sticking to the stock tires.
     
  12. DaveK

    DaveK Senior Member
    Messages: 420

    Yes a smaller tire print does give more PSI but the increase in friction is only due to the fact that a narrower tire will more easily make contact with the pavement while a wide tire will "climb" up on top of the snow.

    A larger print will have more friction (even though the PSI is lower)giving more traction (provided there is not water, snow etc. between the tire and the pavement).

    In mud/snow narrower is better. On dry pavement/sand wider is better.
     
  13. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    What was the original question ???
     
  14. DaveK

    DaveK Senior Member
    Messages: 420

    It had to do with tire pressure and thoughts about purchasing larger tires. I believe he wanted to know the advantages/disadvantages of larger tires.
    From there, the subject of PSI came up. So as most threads do, the discussion went off on a few tangents.

    Did somebody get :confused: ?