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tired of wet floor...

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Up North, Jan 4, 2005.

  1. Up North

    Up North Senior Member
    Messages: 921

    The people that lived here before and built the shop never put in a floor drain. So when I pull in my truck & plow to let the snow melt off I get a ton of water in here. I've put down towels all around the truck but still get some water that breaks the barrier. Anyone have a good suggestion? What if I put "floor-dry" all around the truck? Would that soak it up pretty good? I'm all ears!

    Buck
     
  2. GripTruk

    GripTruk Senior Member
    Messages: 374

  3. ace911emt

    ace911emt Member
    Messages: 83

    If you have the room to pour a second 2"-0" slab over the first and cut the floor for a trench drain. We are not allowed to have a drain but use the trench to collect the water and suck it out with a shop vac/ works great.
     
  4. QMVA

    QMVA Senior Member
    Messages: 431

    They have some that are more heavy duty and have slots in them for water.
     
  5. lindsayC

    lindsayC Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Try "dry" sweeping your truck before putting it away.Ten minutes and a good broom should reduce the amount of water that have to put up with.Tap your fenders lightly with somthing that won't scratch your paint and a lot of the salt slime will drop off.Don't clean it up anywhere near your Water Well and make sure this stuff can run off in spring when it melts.
     
  6. alittle1

    alittle1 Member
    Messages: 35

    If your looking for a short version for a solution your not going to find one. You could put in drying fans that blow across the floor area but you will have to vent the humidity out the roof or side wall with an exhaust fan capable of evacuating the air in the building two to four times per hour. As you may well realize your heat will be going out as well.

    The long term solution would be to cut the concrete floor and dig a drain pit or a pump out sump pit. The easier choice would be the drain pit if you have sufficient ground drainage. You will have to cut the concrete a suitable size, dig down with a backhoe at least 5 - 6 feet. I would suggest doing a percolation test to see what drainage is like in your area. If results are fine then backfill with buckshot gravel and top off with a welded grate for driving over. A pump out drain pit would require a much larger hole and concrete enclosure.

    Knocking off some of the ice and snow underneath the truck would reduce so of the un-wanted water.
     
  7. Kramer

    Kramer Senior Member
    Messages: 386

    Buy a few 16" square x 2" thick pavers and line the floor.

    Leave out the center row to collect the water--then use a shop vac as recommended in the above post.

    :)
     
  8. Up North

    Up North Senior Member
    Messages: 921

    Some good ideas here, thanks. I do knock off as much snow as possible before backing her in, problem is all the snow that gets built up under the chassis.

    As far as knocking out parts of the floor to put in a drain of any sort...I don't think I can do that as all the tubing for my heat is in the floor. I heat with an outdoor wood boiler that pumps hot water into the house and shop for heat. When I built my office here in the shop I didn't even drive nails into the concrete out of fear of tapping into a section of tubing, used PL400 adhesive instead.

    Kramer, I like that idea but what would you use to seal around and in between the pavers so the water doesn't seep out?

    Buck
     
  9. jpunlimited

    jpunlimited Senior Member
    Messages: 132

    drill it

    how thick is the floor? I am guessing it is 4 inches thick. with a concrete blade from home depot cut a hole or square out for a drain also available a home depot. I did at the bottom of a stairway leading to the basement. punched the hole sunk a spackle bucket full of gravel with a million holes drilled into it. put the lid back on. put the drain on top. poured the cement smoothed and when dry I flipped the lid on the drain and drilled a 2 inch hole though the plastic lid allowing the water to get in.
     
  10. LINY Rob

    LINY Rob Senior Member
    Messages: 478

    maybe you could just line the outside area of where the truck is parked with the pavers so the water will stay within it and leave it open by the garage door? Then you could either use a floor rubber squegee you can get in home depot to push the water out, or you could vacuum it.
     
  11. Breck75

    Breck75 Senior Member
    Messages: 111

    :gunsfiring: Bull Doze it and build another shop!!!!!! Well O.K. maybe thats not the answer. On a different note how does the outside wood burner work? Does it heat well? Breck :waving:
     
  12. stumper1620

    stumper1620 Senior Member
    Messages: 222

    how deep in the cement are the boiler pipes, if they are down 1 to 1.5 inches
    pick up a diamond saw blade ( fairly cheap) for a circular saw, set the cut depth to 1/2 to 3/4 inch, bring in a garden hose with a very slow flow of water and let it flow over the cement in front of the saw to keep the dust down, cut a few shallow grooves back to the door if you slope a little the water will go to the groove and out the door, won't look any different than expansion joints, the hard part is staying straight cuts, also you will want to pick up a contractors ground fault interrupter, probably will never trip with a double insulated saw but better safe than sorry. i did this in my in laws basement to get water to the sumps, it works great. :waving:
     
  13. grotecguy

    grotecguy Senior Member
    Messages: 148

    Truely some great ideas here. May use some of them in my basement to direct some "seepage" toward the floor drains.


    the hard part is staying straight cuts...posted by Stumper
    Set up a "fence" with a 2x4 and weight the ends with sandbags from the back of the truck.

    Nice ideas here fellas,
    Mark K
     
  14. Up North

    Up North Senior Member
    Messages: 921

    LOL! Yeah that's not a bad idea. I could rebuild it the way I want it...ah, heck I can't complain. At least I have a shop, my dad wanted one forever and he never got it.

    The woodstove boiler works great, one thing about wet floors in the shop...they dry up quickly after pushing all the water out. Supposed to be really cold tonight, -30 below. But with the boiler we'll be nice a toasty and it doesn't cost me anything other then the wood I put in it.

    Buck
     
  15. DeereGuy

    DeereGuy Senior Member
    Messages: 346

    In some states(ME), I was told I could not put a floor drain in a garage. Something to do with EPA and oil/gas etc leaking into the watershed.

    I do like the saw kerf idea though. If you take the 2x straight edge and mill it to a slow taper with a hand plane or jointer, your saw kerfs could be deeper as they approach the exit or drain. You would have to clamp a small wood fence to the saw platten though. Of course this would only help if your floor is level. My brain hurts now :confused:

    How about a couple strips of pressure treated 1x and a tube of PL400. And a big squeegee. Contain it and sweep it out. Remove the strips in spring. (Well.. maybe PL200.)
     
  16. DeereGuy

    DeereGuy Senior Member
    Messages: 346

    In some states(ME), I was told I could not put a floor drain in a garage. Something to do with EPA and oil/gas etc leaking into the watershed.

    I do like the saw kerf idea though. If you take the 2x straight edge and mill it to a slow taper with a hand plane or jointer, your saw kerfs could be deeper as they approach the exit or drain. You would have to clamp a small wood fence to the saw platten though. Of course this would only help if your floor is level. My brain hurts now :confused:

    How about a couple strips of pressure treated 1x and a tube of PL400. And a big squeegee. Contain it and sweep it out. Remove the strips in spring. (Well.. maybe PL200.)
     
  17. stumper1620

    stumper1620 Senior Member
    Messages: 222

    ya,that would work pretty good, i would've said shoot em down with a ram set but pipes ruled that out, scratch lines don't work as soon as water hits the marks dissappear, i never thought about sand bags, i tell ya, you buy a diamond blade you never need to buy another ( unless you have a brother in law like mine that borrows and borrows but never returns) lol gotta love em,
    :redbounce
     
  18. Runner

    Runner Senior Member
    Messages: 957

    You may just have to do the "two step" plan. Get yourself a floor squeegie and when it melts off, pull the truck out, squeegie the stuf out (only takes a minute) and put your truck back in. The floor will quickly dry, especially if you have floor heat (which by the way is a sweet setup:nod:).
     
  19. xlr8

    xlr8 Senior Member
    Messages: 107

    Runners got the fastest easiest solution, I have to do this at work cause old drain is cemented closed . Laying around in water is right up there with laying on snow in your driveway,sucky!Although if vehicle does not run it is slightly more difficult.
    Steve
     
  20. drplow

    drplow Senior Member
    Messages: 174

    cut a groove in the cement around the truck and toward the lowest spot in the garage. then put a 4" hole where the water sits and a drain cap over the top. if you have enough rock under the pad it will drain the water from whatever you park in there. this solution involves more work at first but who wants to clean there garage floor every day.