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Tips for strage outside.

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by bowtie_guy, Mar 16, 2007.

  1. bowtie_guy

    bowtie_guy Senior Member
    Messages: 551

    My old plow was on a dedicated truck so I never had to store it somewhere. Did oil and then parked the truck. Now with my new plow I have it on my daily driver so I will have to store it somewhere outside. :cry:

    Other than oil, grease exposed cylinder rod, touch up any missing paint areas. What should I do? Better to place a cover over it I'd imagine?? Going to leave it on some gravel so no grass should come though.
    Thanks
     
  2. hammerstein

    hammerstein Senior Member
    Messages: 318

    I thought there were only 2 seasons in Canada, this winter and next winter. I store mine inside year round but still do a lot to them. We power wash the hell out of them and wax the moldboard and frame, spray pivot points with penetrating oil, clean and fill electrical connectors with di-electric grease, and disconnect lift chain and raise the cylinder all the way up so that the lift cylinder is full of fluid. We then put them on a pallet and store on speed rack in the shop. You may want to set it on a couple of wolminized 2x4 so there is no direct ground contact. We also hook them back up to the truck around July, and let it up and down several times and left to right several times.
     
  3. DeereFarmer

    DeereFarmer PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,296

    Grease, grease, grease! Other than that I would personally leave it on a pallet. That is what I do with all my equipment whether it is inside or out. I would use something to cover it, maybe a thick good tarp or you could make a hut for it out of plywood. I've seen it done before. It turns outside storage into inside storage with a small amount of time and $$$.
     
  4. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,557

    Fluid Film The Entire Thing......DONE
     
  5. theplowmeister

    theplowmeister 2000 Club Member
    from MA
    Messages: 2,549

    I put my plow on a double high pallet put grease on all the pistons. ( i have cats so wrap the pistons in wax paper so the cats won't get grease on them if they case a mouse under the plow). I then put an A frame tarp over the plow to keep water off and let air in.
     
  6. DeereFarmer

    DeereFarmer PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,296

    That's a good idea. My white cat was "helping" me put everything away today and came out of the tractor shed covered in grease.
     
  7. HoneyDooYrdWrk

    HoneyDooYrdWrk Junior Member
    Messages: 19

    WHat kind of grease

    Is there any kind of grease do u sugest. can a gut use any kind of grease for the hydraulic pistons or does a guy need to use specific kind of grease
     
  8. CARDOCTOR

    CARDOCTOR PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,310

    dont tarp the plow . the moisture will get trap and cause rust. oil everything


    JR
     
  9. Mark in MD

    Mark in MD Member
    Messages: 40

    Man, I need to get some of this stuff...
     
  10. bowtie_guy

    bowtie_guy Senior Member
    Messages: 551

    Thanks for the tip. I have one who is always out during the summer catching things that move. Seems to find his way into anything.
     
  11. theplowmeister

    theplowmeister 2000 Club Member
    from MA
    Messages: 2,549

    hammerstein
    the seals for the lifting ram are NOT on the bottom of the piston (not on Fisher).
    I raise the lifting ram, grease it then lower the ram. I don't know about other Rams but the Fisher lifting ram has its seals in the cap. so the part of the ram that comes out (piston) surface is what the seals rub against. by leaving the ram up you expose that surface to Rust and nicks, that will cause the seals to fail. By collapsing the piston you keep it in the hydraulic oil

    Ram cutaway.JPG
     
  12. hammerstein

    hammerstein Senior Member
    Messages: 318

    I read that in one of my plows owners manual, that when you lift the ram all the way for summer storage it fills the cylinder with fluid and helps prevent rusting. I don't remember which one but it was not a Fisher.
     
  13. AbsoluteH&L

    AbsoluteH&L Senior Member
    Messages: 573

    If you refer to the picture, I think they mean the area between the seal and spacer. If cylinder is out it's full of oil, with it in that area is dry.
     
  14. theplowmeister

    theplowmeister 2000 Club Member
    from MA
    Messages: 2,549

    That space is full of oil whether the piston is up or down. The seals are above that point! what would keep the oil out of that space? every part below the seal is amerced in oil.
     
  15. AbsoluteH&L

    AbsoluteH&L Senior Member
    Messages: 573

    Hey I didn't write the manual, but I would assume that they know better than I. It was just my $.02 and I still stand behind it. Again refer to diagram: The oil is pressurized from intake port to split bearing, that makes cylinder go out. If there was oil between split bearing and gland nut seal it would compress and blow out the gland nut seal, air can compress. So it is my belief that, that area is air and that is why they say it can rust.
     
  16. theplowmeister

    theplowmeister 2000 Club Member
    from MA
    Messages: 2,549

    OK this is the internet so winning nan argument is like P****** into the wind you feal better but at what cost. The split bearing is not a seal! oil goes past it.
     
  17. Flipper

    Flipper PlowSite.com Addict
    from CT
    Messages: 1,180

    Now I have inside storage, which we still need to get setup. Maybe a loft or something.

    In the past we put everything on pallets and put them in the salt tent. When we went to a container for salt we used that. I cut a hole in it for an exhaust fan that would run on a humidity switch. Now the conainter is used to store seed and fertilizer and such over the summer.
     
  18. AbsoluteH&L

    AbsoluteH&L Senior Member
    Messages: 573

    I'm not arguing, pissing, or even winning. Your rite, I guess I was thinking of a double acting cylinder. Then it would be a seal, but there would still be oil on both sides due to the other port. So you were rite I was wrong, but thats not the point. Keep in mind this forum is for discussion, people ask questions, people give answers. People learn things!:) I was just trying to figure out ,or learn, why the manual would say that. As I said
    "Hey I didn't write the manual, but I would assume that they know better than I. It was just my $.02 ... So it is my belief ..."
    SO to get back on topic. I do a post season maintenance: paint, parts, and lube as needed. Then leave my plows out side, my only option, on blocks with lubed up cylinders. I keep the lift frame and pumps inside
     
  19. theplowmeister

    theplowmeister 2000 Club Member
    from MA
    Messages: 2,549

    Sorry, I came across a little to mean:gunsfiring: However I have it on good authority
    that "I am right, I am always right, even if I'm wrong I'm right":D ;) ;)
     
  20. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,476

    :rolleyes: :nono:
    On a ram like in your post #11 it is a single action ram(one hose)
    there is oil only on one side of the packing/ (split bearing?)
    air on the other side.

    The seals/packing/split bearing keep oil from filling up the ram if it did not oil would shoot out by the wiper-seal that is held in by the gland nut.
    The gland nut holds in the wiper seal and some packing/spacer so the plunger is held in place(so is does not flop around in the bore)


    On a double acting ram (two hoses) there is oil on both sides of the packing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2008