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Tips for starting a cold gas engine spreader

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by Brad3403, Dec 4, 2014.

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  1. Brad3403

    Brad3403 Senior Member
    from Alberta
    Messages: 392

    I thought I would pass on a few tricks I've learned for starting my gas spreaders when its COLD. Feel free to add any additional tips.

    -Pull the "pull start" a couple times just to move the oil a bit before actually trying to start it.
    -Keep a good quality spray bottle with gas in it in the truck. Remove the air cleaner and spray a little gas into the air intake then either use the battery start or pull start. Not a good idea to use "ether" as it could cause damage to the engine.

    -This trick worked AWESOME last week when our temperatures were -28 Celsius. The engine was so cold that by using the pull start you could barely pull it. After 10 minutes of trying to pull start it and spraying gas into the air intake it still showed no sign of starting. I sent my guy to Walmart to buy a dryer vent hose (the expandable metal kind, $14). We backed a Bobcat up to the spreader and slid the dryer vent over the exhaust of the Bobcat, we put the other end up beside the spreader motor and threw a rubber garbage can over the motor and directed the warm exhaust from the dryer vent hose inside it. After 10 minutes we removed the garbage can and directed the warm exhaust directly into the air intake for about 1 minute. We then tried pull starting it and it fired right up.

    From now on, I'm going to keep a long enough piece of dryer vent in every truck to reach from the truck exhaust to the spreader engine.
     
  2. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,972

    -Keep a good quality spray bottle with gas in it in the truck.

    Really. You think that this is in any way shape or form an acceptable practice?
    Sorry to say but your "tips" of starting a cold engine are dangerous and should not be shared.
     
  3. Brad3403

    Brad3403 Senior Member
    from Alberta
    Messages: 392

    Sorry, I assumed most people would have the common sense to understand that when I said "keep a good quality spray bottle with gas in it in the truck", that it would be kept in the box and not in the cab. You don't keep you're "jerry can" in the cab do you. Just to make it perfectly clear for you, "DON'T KEEP IT IN THE CAB"!!!!!!!!!!!

    "Ether" is made for starting engines this way. Yes, you have to be careful doing it and use common sense.
     
  4. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,972

    Oh the...I assume statement. That your using is hilarious!
    And common sense? Really. You might wanna think about that yourself
     
  5. Sprag-O

    Sprag-O Senior Member
    Messages: 220

    When my quad gave me trouble on the -0F type of nights... I never thought to pipe my truck/tractor exhaust over the engine of it... I just went after it with a heat gun for 1-2 minutes.
     
  6. John_DeereGreen

    John_DeereGreen PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,898

    Tips for starting a cold gas engine spreader:

    Convert it to hydraulic or electric.

    Tip book complete.
     
  7. Brian Young

    Brian Young PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,382

    LOL yep! Never had any starting, or any issues with our electric motors. If your going to use anything to help start something like an engine just use Thrust penetrating oil in a spray can. Either washes out the cylinders and over time I guess it could score the walls, at least thats what Ive been told
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2014
  8. jrs.landscaping

    jrs.landscaping Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 637

    After using all three I'd never purchase another gas spreader again, I honestly don't miss the aggravation, push a button or flip a valve and it's on........
     
  9. Brad3403

    Brad3403 Senior Member
    from Alberta
    Messages: 392

    I've heard many complaints about electric spreaders as well, especially in larger sanders. Yes, hydraulic would be ideal but for me its just not feasible.

    There are MANY gas spreaders out there and I'm just sharing some things that work for me to get them started when its really cold.
     
  10. allseasons87

    allseasons87 Senior Member
    Messages: 813

    Go electric
     
  11. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    I feel sorry for you
    You have to pull start your spreader I never had mine not want to start even when we had the -20 below 0
    Now in the fall from sitting all summer I use Ether to get fired up
    All I have to do push the starter from the cab
     
  12. concreteguy

    concreteguy Senior Member
    Messages: 131

    My gas v-box always starts in cold weather, it's inside. LOL. When I did park outside though, I never had a problem with it starting and that's when I even had the Briggs. The one problem I could see is if the choke lever is out of adjustment and the choke doesn't close all the way.
    As far as leaving gas in a box, that's probably more dangerous than the cab. At least in the cab you'll know it's leaking, the box you might not know until it blows. Either can be used, just don't over-use. As far as electric vs. gas, if you don't take care and maintain, you'll have issues with both
     
  13. beanz27

    beanz27 Senior Member
    Messages: 984

    Ether used sensibly wont hurt it.
     
  14. John_DeereGreen

    John_DeereGreen PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,898

    I will agree in a larger box electric probably isn't the answer. That's when I'd go hydraulic.
     
  15. Brad3403

    Brad3403 Senior Member
    from Alberta
    Messages: 392

    What do you spray on the choke and throttle linkages to keep them from seizing up?? I tried Fluid Film and found that it "gummed"up
     
  16. concreteguy

    concreteguy Senior Member
    Messages: 131

    I like the gas personally, but I see the benefit of hydraulic. My problem with it is that in certain situations where you let off the pedal, it slows the spread. In most cases it doesn't matter, just don't like it. My partners truck is an F 550 and it runs off the trans. When the truck is running you barely hear the truck except for the pto. And no, it's not engaged. When it was installed they said that's just the way they sound. It's not too loud, just sounds like a load lifter. Another point is when you need to turn the salter on and then off, trying to spot treat, it's cumbersome with the hydraulic lever, apposed to the remote I have. I also like the gas in the fact that the hydraulic is the same price for the box and then you have the added cost of the pto. My Swenson is wireless and could go on any truck in a matter of a half hour. In the event the truck goes down
     
  17. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,972

    Keep them clean, anything.on them and they'll gum right up
     
  18. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    That's what I like my Swenson Gas V box any truck can run it

    I use WD40 on the linkage doesn't gum up + wash it keep things clean is the key to anything
     
  19. White Gardens

    White Gardens 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,665

    Yes, letting off the peddle you get some flow drop, but it's only when you are doing large lots and you have the spreader valves on high output settings

    Otherwise, the lever is no issue. Our hydro units have been extremely reliable.



    ....
     
  20. concreteguy

    concreteguy Senior Member
    Messages: 131

    I know, I'm just talking when your detailing a lot or in certain situations, I don't like when it spreads slower or faster. One thing about hydraulic is that it's probably more reliable in the corrosion department