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This weekend's carnage.. E60 owners might want to check this!

Discussion in 'Meyer / Diamond Products Discussion' started by Powastroka, Dec 24, 2009.

  1. Powastroka

    Powastroka Member
    Messages: 84

    Let me start off by saying E60 pumps are great! But you absolutely have to have the hydralic pressure checked, set, and rechecked every season..... OR ELSE!

    This is what happend to me for not knowing any better.

    Started plowing early sunday morning @ 3:30

    This is the E60 top cover @ 7am
    [​IMG]

    After calling everywhere, I finaly found a place that had the top cap. Normaly would have taken just under an hour to get there and back, took me three..

    New Cap:
    [​IMG]

    The pump worked great, and I thought I was back in buisness, untill at about 9pm:

    [​IMG]

    Close up:
    [​IMG]

    Now not saying that the pressure was directly the problem.. "pump is a 1995" and have no idea how it was cared for before me. Im just saying that everyone I have talked to say that the E60's are MONSTERS, and if not set properly, can and will commit suicide!
     
  2. Kenyou

    Kenyou Senior Member
    Messages: 375

    I try to copy everything on Plowsite that i think I may have to use. Here is what I have as far as pump pressure and breaking the top cap per B&B and others.

    http://www.plowsite.com/showthread.php?t=72173&highlight=meyer+pump+pressure

    Drop the pump press down some from the original Meyer spec, it will save the top cap breakage/cracking issues that these E60's have had since their inception. 2200 psi is all you need at full relief and more than enough to lift most any blade anyway. It will reward you over the long run by prolonging top cap life for sure. It'll lift just as fast set at 2200 as it will at 2500. It will simply prolong the top cap life by doing so. B&B
     
  3. CARDOCTOR

    CARDOCTOR PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,310

    were you stacking . last one i saw like that was broken stacking without stops on plowloop
     
  4. grec-o-face

    grec-o-face Senior Member
    Messages: 485

    Powastroka and I will definitely be adding correct blade-stops the the hoop.
     
  5. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    There's only two things that break them. Pump pressure set too high (as you know) or the moldboard contacting the lift arm while stacking. Both accounts happen with regularity. :nod:

    2200 PSI max and the correct stops prevents them both.
     
  6. Powastroka

    Powastroka Member
    Messages: 84

    Thank you B&B, I will be sure to check them both. I have a classic mount on a superduty that used to have a E47 and now has the 60, so I think the stops are off, and the pump presure was too high...
     
  7. firefighter1406

    firefighter1406 Senior Member
    Messages: 328

    Does anybody have any pics on what port to hook up the guage to, how you check the pressure? This is the first year with contracts and can not afford to break down unexpectedly. I would like to check the pressure on my E-60 so I hopefully dont have this happen to me.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  8. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    No need to use the test port. Simply tee your gauge into either of the angle hoses and check it there. Pressure readings are the same there as in the test port. A little less messy too.
     
  9. bradt

    bradt Junior Member
    from NW MN
    Messages: 23

    how damn ironic. i had been reading this thread just two days ago when it started to snow (we ended up with about 18"). tonight, was pushing and all was going well. until the blade would not go up - bad motor; and, due to some forethought, i had a new one on hand - replaced it and back to work. then, bang! i saw the lift arm jump up at the end of a push (not stacking) and the blade would not come up. got out to look and i saw exactly what the first picture showed here.
    as usual, a saturday night, no parts anywhere in a 90 mile radius and calls for service. thanks E60H.

    so, when checking pressure, do you check the pressure during the move or at the end of the piston stroke?
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2009
  10. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    At the end of the stroke once the pump is against the relief valve. An angle hose is the convenience place to tap in a gauge. Simply angle it for whichever hose you tee into.
     
  11. bradt

    bradt Junior Member
    from NW MN
    Messages: 23

    i'll just make a tee with some quick connects on each end and insert it between the hose and pump. thanks.
     
  12. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Thats what I use. :nod:
     
  13. bradt

    bradt Junior Member
    from NW MN
    Messages: 23

    just out of curiosity, is there a chance that my instance could have happened with the motor replacement? the old motor was the original, never been removed and it went out. it just seems too coincidental to have two failures inside of five minutes. i had the plow installed a couple years ago and i am thinking that the installer may have set the pressure too high to accomodate for the older (and possibly slower) motor. if the newer motor was faster, would this have caused the cap to burst? the new motor is a direct replacement and is the same listed rpm, volt, etc. after the motor was replaced, i maybe pushed for five minutes before it destroyed itself.
     
  14. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Sure it's possible if the relief setting was compensating for a weak motor or the relief changed on it own (which they will). Same reason a periodic pressure check on the Meyer pumps is considered as a maintenance item as far as I'm concerned. I do them a couple times a season or at any time they're here getting anything done.
     
  15. Dissociative

    Dissociative 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,066

    ---------------------hi-jack alert--------------

    so on a newer pro-plus......is there any way to turn up that pump to make lift faster?...

    also about the stops.....do i need to add them to my western?
     
  16. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Needs the pump pressure checked to be sure it set to the proper PSI. But DO NOT increase it above that as a method of attempting to force a faster lifting speed. It won't work.

    If it's still weak then it has other issues such as a weak power supply, debris in the filter, quill turned in too far or a motor issue.
     
  17. bradt

    bradt Junior Member
    from NW MN
    Messages: 23

    funny thing is, is that pressure doesn't always equate to flow. turning up the pressure won't necessarily allow faster plow movement because realistically, it only takes 200 psi to turn a plow and about 700 to lift it. so, more pressure is not the answer. this much i do know...so, i don't really know what happened to mine, or what the installer did, but, i am now thinking that i know more than the installer did...
     
  18. Powastroka

    Powastroka Member
    Messages: 84

    Sometimes the case...

    Got the pump back together yesterday with the help of my Brother from a different Mother grec-O-face! Will be posting more pic's and info soon! I would like to make a suggestion to the moderators to make this thread a sticky to clear up a bunch of asked E60 questions.

    B
     
  19. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    My comment wasn't meant to imply that increasing PSI increases speed because it doesn't. It's simply a Band-aid that unknowing guys do in an attempt to make up for a weak pump or motor, which it does not.

    However what it does do is greatly increase the force of the lift ram whacking the top cap every time the blade is lifted and will take it out in short order, just as you discovered. Especially once a fresh motor or pump is installed and the pressure not adjusted accordingly.

    Many also simply break from the repeated beatings it takes from the lift ram, which is why correctly placed stops are important to long top cap life. Especially on the E60's with the 1 3/4" cylinder bores.
     
  20. bradt

    bradt Junior Member
    from NW MN
    Messages: 23

    agreed, and i wasn't inferring anything. we'll see how much damage has actually been sustained after complete tear-down.