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Thinking of going to 235 Snow Tires

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by darryl g, Jan 22, 2013.

  1. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Hey. I'm thinking of going with 235/85R16s for the dedicated snow tires/wheels I want to purchase for my 2003 Silverado. I've always run the stock 245/75 all terrain tires on it year- round (Firestone Transforce) but it's time to get serious and get some dedicated snow tires for it. I hate being in the situation where I have decent AT tires on it but they just don't cut it for plowing once they get a little worn, and it kills me to pull them with so much life left on them.

    I always ran 235s on my old 1985 K20 and it plowed very well with them. Other than looks, is there any reason I shouldn't get the 235s. About all I do in the winter is plow and it's all local, no highway, no towing. I know they will look skinny and the truck won't look very cool, but I'm looking for function over looks. What do you all think?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Well I was able to fine tune my search...I got too many matches before so had a hard time finding applicable discussions. From reading through a dozen or so threads It looks like the 235s are the way to go.

    The shop that installed my plow advised against them and sold me a new set of 245s...I needed new tires when it got the plow installed (the tires that are on it now) and had practially brand new ones on my old plow truck. I was thinking of swapping them, but he talked me out of it...said they were too skinny for my truck. Thinking about it now, I think he just wanted to sell me a set of tires.
     
  3. wahlturfcare

    wahlturfcare Senior Member
    Messages: 320

    i only run 235 tires for year round work. They are by far the best size tire to get.
    my 04 dually originally had 265s on them, but it sucked for ride comfort and traction.

    The skinnier tires gives alot better ride and traction.

    the reason he might of steered you away from them, is your rims may be too wide. For 235s you need a 7'' or smaller width rim.
     
  4. hatefulmechanic

    hatefulmechanic Senior Member
    Messages: 228

    You can run a 235/85/16 on those wheels, I have later Silverado wheels on one of my shop trucks and run that size tire no problem.

    I normally run a very aggressive mud tire that is studable, and stud the crap out of them. On my 2wd trucks, they rarely get stuck.

    4wd ones will climb a wall.
     
  5. Buy them from Treadwright for a winter set on an extra set of rims and switch them out
     
  6. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Trying to locate a set of used wheels now and it's proving to be more difficult than I expected. Plenty of 6 lug ones and singles but not sets of four 8 lugs. I found them on Ebay but that would run me $271 shipped...rather get some local take-offs. Gonna go look at what a scrap yard has now but not too into rusty/crappy wheels. I found some on Craigs list but they have tires on them that I don't want = too much money.
     
  7. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    The difference between 235 and 245 is only 10. That's a measurement in millimeters, which is equal to 0.39 inches. It REALLY isn't enough to make any measurable difference at all.
     
  8. theholycow

    theholycow PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,180

    Yup. Another way to look at it is that the difference is 4% width. That's not much at all -- nominal widths from one manufacturer to the next probably vary more when marked the same. If the effect is linearly proportional to width, 235's will cut through snow 4% better. That doesn't mean that 235's are a bad idea or that there aren't other variables in play too, but still we're not talking about anything huge. If you're talking about real winter tires vs. all-season, new vs. worn, better tread compound or design vs. worse, etc, you could be looking at a decent advantage even at the same width.

    Lately I've been thinking about this. For general driving on roads with slush or fresh powder even a little bit of width might make a big difference in cutting through. For pushing a plow in driveways or parking lots, are you really going to cut through the snow and have your rubber make direct contact with the surface underneath, whether narrow or wide?
     
  9. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Right, but what you need to look at is how that affects the psi on the ground across the contact patch, the shape of it and the distrubution of weight across it. If the weight were equally distrubuted across the contact patch, it wou'dn't make all that much difference, but because most of the weight is at the center of it, reducing the width of it has a larger effect on the psi exerted on the ground than you'd expect. What you get is a longer, narrower contact patch in the direction of your travel with more weight exerted on it = better traction...more than the 4% you guys are saying.

    P.S. - The contact patch size also does not change at the same ratio as the width difference of the tires. It's really not that simple.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2013
  10. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    Snow tires in 235s rule...Real snow tires like Cooper M&S, MasterCraft MSRs, Blizzaks...
     
  11. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Yeah, that's the route I'm headed but haven't been able to find a set of wheels yet. Lots of 6 lug ones and rusty old style 8 lugs but no new style 8 lugs that don't have tires on them that increase the price. I really don't want to spend more than $200 on a set of wheels. I did find one set of chromed ones but they're way out on Long Island, NY and I don't want to drive that far.
     
  12. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    $200 will pay for a couple of rounds of mount and balance. Put the 235s on your rims.
     
  13. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Yeah, I suppose I could put them on my current wheels and then I have until spring to find another set of wheels. The other decision is whether to stud or not, and I've decided not to. I have a set of chains for the rear if I really additional traction.
     
  14. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    I ran studs. They do help on ice. But chains are the ticket when the going gets tough
     
  15. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Yeah, I was amazed at what I could get through with chains on. I ran them for the 2 blizzards we had two years ago and did mark up the asphalt sealer in the turn-around area on one driveway I do...not from spinning, just from doing tight maneuvering. It seems to bother me more than it does the customer. I offered to have it re-sealed for them but they declined. I didn't realize that chains on the rear would mark up pavement just from turning hard...now I know and will back out rather than trying to turn around in the driveway.
     
  16. theholycow

    theholycow PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,180

    If you're not keeping the tires on all year and if your pavement accounts won't be damaged by studs, do get studs...it's not like you can't put chains on studded tires.
     
  17. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Potential damge from studs is one of my concerns. All of my accounts are residential except for one factory lot. Also, the roads are pretty well maintained where I am, and being down on the shore wet/slushy is the norm for most of our storms...often it starts as snow, changes over to a mix and then rain. I usually get to them all before they freeze up. If I get studdable snows I can always add them later...I admit I have gone back and forth on the issue in my head, so I still could go either way.
     
  18. theholycow

    theholycow PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,180

    It is my understanding that it's pretty tough to add studs later, as the stud holes get all full of gravel and such. That's not to say you couldn't do it by hand, cleaning the stud holes out, but it'd be a pain. I imagine cleaning gravel from stud-holes is slower than (for comparison) removing studs by hand...took me a few hours (and a big palm blister) to remove studs from two 205/75-15's.
     
  19. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Good point about adding them later...thanks, hadn't thought of that. I should have, being a stud myself. :)
     
  20. darryl g

    darryl g Senior Member
    from CT
    Messages: 385

    Well....no choice but to go ahead and get new tires with a blizzard on the way. I don't want to have to be running around with chains on for days. I went with the Arctic Claws that are made by Cooper and distributed under a couple of different side brands. It's what my tire dealer has on all of his vehicles...that's good enough for me. I did go with the 235s.

    http://www.bigotires.com/Tire-Detail/Arctic-Claw/Winter-XSI/13086
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2013