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thermostat

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by cowboy, Dec 31, 2000.

  1. cowboy

    cowboy Member
    Messages: 75

    Howdy folks,

    The heater in my 74 Dodge doesn't get very warm, at all, it is kinda luke warm. And I'm afraid when I start plowing it will be like 20 degrees in my cab with my windows icing up :(

    I'm thinking of changing the thermostat in it, but my concern is when I get a plow on this thing is it going to obstruct the air flow enough where having a lower thermostat may make the engine run too hot?

    and do you guys have any recommendations for what temp thermostat I should get

    thanks
     
  2. Eric ELM

    Eric ELM Husband, Father, Friend, Mentor, Angel
    from Chicago
    Messages: 239

    I run a 190 degree thermostat and angle my plow while driving down the road. I don't have any problems on a 97 HD F250.
     
  3. SCL

    SCL Senior Member
    Messages: 265

    A stock temp. thermo, usually 180, is fine, you just have to remember that that is the temp that it opens up at and that shouldn't have much to do with overheating due to a plow mount. Another thing with a vehicle of this age is to see if the temperature control aperati(huh?) are working okay, ie.. the control cable, vent closure, air diverter. You never know>
     
  4. cowboy

    cowboy Member
    Messages: 75

    well the temperature control valve was taken off and so now it is on full hot all the time.

    I added coolant to teh radiator and that didnt' help.

    so I figure thermostat must be a high temp....right?

    any other ideas would be a help.
     
  5. Rooster

    Rooster Member
    from Kansas
    Messages: 650

    I have a 1984 Dodge, had similar problems.

    First I pulled the fuse and replaced it, just to make sure it was seated good. Second replaced the fan motor switch.
    The switch check out okay, but after replacement blower motor worked better.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. SlimJim Z71

    SlimJim Z71 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,031

    I actually think I have a 160-degree thermostat in my truck, my temp gauge never gets anywhere near the 200-degree mark... except when I'm going 45 with the plow up. My heat works okay. I would recommend that you put a 180-degree thermostat in, and maybe flush your cooling system, especially if it's an older truck. Your cooling system is #1 when it comes to plowing. It's keeping your engine cool, you trans cool, and your heat warm. If any of those three go out on you, it's gonna make for a miserable winter...

    -Tim
     
  7. Dusty

    Dusty Member
    Messages: 82

    the most important thing about a thermostat is that it keeps the engine at proper operating temperature. If the engine runs cold, then sludge builds up in the block. In bitter cold weather I put a piece of cardboard in front of the radiator and keep an eye on the temperature gauge. It should be in the middle when the engine reaches proper operating range. If you run with a cold engine you get poor fuel milage. Also it could be that the heater core is clogged. On a truck that age, I would have the radiator cleaned and install all new hoses and a 180 degree thermostat. Nothing less than a 50/50 mixture of anti freeze is also required for proper operation. Worn out anti freeze will still protect your engine from freezing, but will take its toll on the water pump and the rest of the cooling system. Change it every other year.
     
  8. cowboy

    cowboy Member
    Messages: 75

    thanks for all the help

    I'll go get the system flushed and put a 180 thermostat in and see if it helps, will post the results

    thanks again for the help

    Cowboy
     
  9. Dusty

    Dusty Member
    Messages: 82

    If you want to go the economy route, change the thermostat first and see how things are then. An even easier way to test the theory of a bad thermostat, is to place a piece of cardboard in front of the radiator and see if it makes a differance. If it does, then the problem is definately the thermostat. Do not cover more that 3/4 of the radiators surface. If the temp gauge goes up but the heat in the cab is no better, then the coolant level is low or the heater core is plugged. I assume that you have all blower speeds working.