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TGS Wiring ?

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by BUFF, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,321

    I picked up a used Meyer 350s TGS this fall, went on line for wiring schematic and did the install. I didn't like the idea of going directly to the battery with the hot lead and put in a in-line fuse by the battery. I put in a 30amp fuse, tested and all was good, so I thought.
    We finally got some snow and used the spreader a couple of times without issue until yesterday. Long story short the fuse popped, after actually reading the whole manual I realized the "Blast" function shoots 70amps to the motor. Yes I'm way under fused for the amps being pulled. Since commonly available fuses typically only go to 30amps I'm planning on putting in Type 1 or Type 3 circuit breaker due to the amps being drawn.
    I also went on-line to check other MFG's wiring diagrams and they show the same. The Motor on the Meyer doesn't appear to have any overload protection and the thought is the breaker would prevent the motor from getting smoked.

    Finally the question is has anyone else had this concern and put in a breaker?

    Thx
     
  2. forbidden

    forbidden Senior Member
    Messages: 392

    There are many 70 amp even up to 300amp fuses available on the market today. Head into any specialty car audio shop as this would be an item that they use all of the time. They will also stock the 4 guage minimum line that you will want for the power and ground. Run the line direct to your battery and fuse it within 18" of the battery. Buy a couple of spare fuses just in case. The fuse is to protect the vehicle, not the sanding unit. You must fuse for both the length of the line and the guage of the line. You do not want to say use a 10 gauge line and try to run 70 amps down it for 25 feet, bad things are going to happen. The longer the line is, the more the resistance in that line. Use a good 4 gauge wire that is OFC and as many strands as possible. A good wire specifically car audio related can be found from manufacturers like Scosche EFX, Streetwires, Audison and others (welding wire is also a passable substitute). Most specialty car audio shops stock wire in red and black and sell it by the foot. Make sure that you upgrade all of the grounds in the vehicle at the same time to as large a guage as possible. This is called a Big 3 upgrade (or 4 if you ground the sander to the battery). The grounds are the most important part of the electrical upgrade. Do not remove the stock ones, add to them. Here is a link on proper grounding that I wrote up some years back.

    http://www.the12volt.com/installbay/forum_posts.asp~TID~49445~PN~1
    http://www.the12volt.com/installbay/forum_posts.asp~TID~73496~PN~1
     
  3. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,321

    Hey thx for the refresher course, sometimes you need another perspective to see the whole picture, Tree in the Forest scenario.
    The wiring harness hasn't been tamper with and it has either 4 or 6 ga wire so I think I'm good. I'm leaning towards the Type 1 Circuit Breaker solely because it's a self contained unit and being under the hood I think that's an advantage. The type 3 is cool but the reset button has some disadvantages due to the potential of getting crud and not working. Fuses has the advantage of being easy to replace if needed, no tools needed and no fasteners to drop in the snow. I guess it boils down to two things local availabilty of either option and me making up my mind.

    When I was searching for options I noticed most of the high amp stuff was geared towards stereo's and the rest was RV/Marine stuff.
    I can't believe the MFG doesn't direct you to use something to protect the vehicle or spreader. I think either way will serve the purpose I'm looking for.
    Thx again for your input, like I said another perspective is all you need sometimes.

    Later David
     
  4. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,321

    Forbidden
    I went to a local truck/auto parts store and picked up one big a$$ in-line fuse(100amp max), "2" 70amp fuses for $20.00 today. Thx again for the refresher.
    This thing is huge

    Bigg Fuse 002.JPG

    Bigg Fuse 001.JPG
     
  5. forbidden

    forbidden Senior Member
    Messages: 392

    That would appear to be a Maxi fuse. Good score. Make sure you solder those ends to the wire and use a plated terminal for the battery connection and solder it as well. DO NOT rely on crimps.
     
  6. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,321

    Yep a Maxi and the name fit's too....
    Crimps are easy and a PITA all at the same time, been there done that.
    Also got some wicked thick shrink tube to seal it all up too.
    A buddy of mine use to build race car chassis and his niche is wiring, the guy showed me a lot of good stuff. He's no longer with us due to a wreck on a bike, but that's another story.
    Thanks again for your input