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Suspension Lift and plow

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by Greenwalt, Aug 14, 2008.

  1. Greenwalt

    Greenwalt Member
    Messages: 75

    Well, I have been pushing for tne years on a quad and have been throwing around the idea of putting a blade on my truck for about three now, and after last season I am ready to upgrade. I have a 94 K2500 with a six inch suspension lift, and have been told by mulitple shops in the area that has to come off before a blade can go on. Personally I think that is bs, I have seen many trucks lifted, and with blades on them. My question is, what do I need to change to have it function right, ie mount correctly and have the correct angle. Any insight, pictures or people that have done it would be much appreciated.
     
  2. seeyaa

    seeyaa Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Well you are right, that is bs. I have a lift 06 Duramax and have a Snoway plow. It has an adjustable mount. The blade angle might be off a little bit and the cutting edge might wear a bit, but I find it plows better then my Z71 with no lift. By the way, the Z71 also had a Snoway plow. I think Snoway makes an awesome plow. Bought 2 of them in 4 years. For 2 different vehicles.:D
     
  3. RBRONKEMA GHTFD

    RBRONKEMA GHTFD 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,592

    It canbe done. What you need to do is modify the mount for the plow. Basically, you will need to add length to the mount to get it to drop down to a factory height, or setting, as if the truck were not lifted. Make sence? You'll be making drop down brackets. Theres a guy in my area that has done this to his truck. I am not sure what kind of plow you are looking for, but the way the boss snow plows mounts are configured, and what not there easier to add lenght to. Hope this makes sence.
     
  4. Kevin Kendrick

    Kevin Kendrick Senior Member
    Messages: 397

    That is not necessarily BS. We have had 2 guys come in in the past year with 6" lifts on their trucks and haven't been able to put plows on them. Not because it CANT be done, but more for liability reasons and the cost of modifications. One guy had a plow on his truck and THEN took the truck to have a lift kit put on it. When they put the lift on the truck, they removed the support brackets for undercarriage. There was no way the support brackets could be put back on without some major modifications. There are some lift kits out there that just will not allow you to put a plow properly on the truck.

    In some cases, there is not an interference problem and simply extending the side plates to get the undercarriage down to the proper factory setting is all it takes.
     
  5. nbenallo33

    nbenallo33 Senior Member
    Messages: 826

    the reason you cant put a plow on a truck w/ a lift is when you put the blade on the ground and angle it the blade will lift up on one corner. you can modify the mount but it wond be very strong in a nice heavy snow storm you will break that mount it will just fold under
     
  6. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,045

    You can fab up the mount to be plenty strong, it's the rest of the truck when lifted that I would worry about..:drinkup: I'm sure SnoFarmer will chime in and help you out. LOL
     
  7. Greenwalt

    Greenwalt Member
    Messages: 75

    Ok, so it sounds like I need to make drop brackets for the mount. I'm assuming snofarmer has done this a time or two?
     
  8. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    No you need to lose the lift kit or find another truck. Is it a work truck or a toy? if it's a toy get a work truck, if it's a work truck, lose the lift, the 41s and all the play stuff.

    You can modify a mount but you will abuse the hell out of the truck, have poor visibility, and maneuverability and basically have a inefficient piece of equipment. But it can be done.
     
  9. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    What size tire you running?

    And what type and size of plow do you plan to run?

    Getting the plow to work is no problem...getting someone to carry the liability to modify the mount and keeping the truck alive are the major factors.
     
  10. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    If you consider the quality of the work to be secondary, even if you foot the bill and can find someone to modify and support, it's tough to plow what you can't see.
     
  11. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Didn't ask price....

    Maybe thats next..:D
     
  12. Greenwalt

    Greenwalt Member
    Messages: 75

    The truck has 35's on it. I'm going to have to think this one over some more.
     
  13. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    35s, 41s what 's the difference still a poor choice of a plow tire
     
  14. Mark13

    Mark13 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,737

    So 33's are far superior over 35's??
     
  15. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,045

    I totally agree on a poor choice for plow tires but there is a huge diff between a 35" tire and a 41 inch tire. If he put the stockers back on it wouldn't sit much higher then a Ford. I'm not saying plowing with a lift is the best idea but my 07 GM has a 6 " lift on it and 35 " tires and if I put the stockers back on it I wouldn 't even think twice about not plowing with it. That being said i have over 20 other peices of equipment to back this up, if it should break down. A truck you make your living with is better left stock, I'm still agreeing with Basher and B and B, just putting my $.02 in.:drinkup:
     
  16. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,045

    Yes, 35" tires are generally wider and float on the snow, you want a narrow tire that will get down to the ground for traction.
     
  17. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Stock size rubber is the best choice. You don't want to float on the top.:nono: you need black top for traction. the larger the foot print the lower the lbs per sq inch loads on the tires leading to lower traction.

    you should be running a high load rated tire, E rated at least, unusual (in my experience) to find in the larger tires in a "work truck" load rating, they tend to be load range D. Carrying a snowplow is tough on the sidewalls of the tire, the lighter load rate the tire the side walls start breaking down and the sooner it breaks down or wears out.

    The more rubber on the road the more stress on the steering components. yes the weight's the same but the friction resistance is greatly increased. Plus you're increasing unsprung weight. Now you're adding additional stress to suspension components, ball joints, frame mounting points, all things you have already increased the stress on by adding the plow.

    Add the fact that the drivetrain must work harder just to turn the wheels means you are also losing a portion of your usable power and increasing your fuel consummation.

    But yes I would say 31s are superior 33s are superior to 35s for plow work, but stock sizes are best.
     
  18. Mark13

    Mark13 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,737

    You can get 35+" tires that are in the 10.5" wide area. They look like pizza cutter tires. My 285s are 11.5" wide or something along those lines.

    I'm not saying its going to be a great plow truck but you can get larger tires that are still pretty thin. I'm probably going to lift my truck 4-5" and run 35s in the summer and narrow 33s or 35s in the winter.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2008
  19. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    Addressing the width only deals with 2 of the issues, the weight of your footprint, and friction resistance

    So I get the feeling you're not getting a new plow truck and turning your Chevy into a toy. Do you read the posts you don't participate in? Have you read any of the comments made in the numerous threads about plowing with a lifted truck? Have you read what JD DAVE said in this thread?

    Lets look at what JD DAVE has to say, with editoral note

    He just circles around the same point we all are. He HAS a lifted truck and thinks IF he put STOCK TIRES on it he COULD plow with it until IT BROKE, but He wouldn't even try it with-out changing the tires.

    Do a search, Ask the guys who have posted about plowing with raised trucks how it's working out, but you can't justify it by getting skinny tires. Why buy them in the first place for God's sake? Profile?
     
  20. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,045

    LOL. Thanks basher. On a side note, I think 285's are even to big to plow with. I've tried them and I don't think they are very safe on the road in a snow storm or in a parking lot. I like my stock 245's for plowing on all our trucks. To add to Bashers comment. If I only had one truck to make my living off, it would be basically 100% stock, no power adders or anything. I have found that generally on anything I own, including farm equipment, stock is best and when something does break, the parts are easy to get. JMO