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Storing for the summer...

Discussion in 'Residential Snow Removal' started by MsQueen, Apr 9, 2005.

  1. MsQueen

    MsQueen Member
    Messages: 76

    Any suggestions on how to store (outside) my plow? I was going to cover it with a tarp. I already put penetrating oil on the seals. Thanks and have a great summer!
     
  2. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Make sure you don't cover it completely. Leave enough open so that moisture doesn't get trapped and there is enough air circulation. Moisture leads to rusting.

    An alternative to a tarp would be leaning a piece of plywood against it. Mainly, you want to protect it from the sun's rays.

    Of course, since you said you oiled the seals, I assumed you also washed it good, too.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2005
  3. MsQueen

    MsQueen Member
    Messages: 76

    No, I didn't wash it. What do you suggest to use to wash it and do I wash the life/angling cylinders also? Thanks.
     
  4. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Plain soap and water; like you would your car. No, I wouldn't especially worry about the lift & angle cylinders. After washing it, run the plow up and down, then side to side to get moisture off the cylinders. After it dries, you might coat them lightly with plain grease for storing. Mainly, you want to wash anything exposed to get rid of dirt and salt from the snow. You would also want to sand, apply primer and paint to any chipped areas where it's down to bare metal to keep that from rusting. Replace bent or damaged parts; like pins or hoses. Check the bolts to the mounting mechanism and any damage there. Check hydraulic fluid level.

    Next Fall, plan to replace the fluid if you didn't this Spring.

    It can be kind of a pain doing all this now when you want to be onto other things associated with warm weather. But a little time now can save you from some nasty surprises the first time out after it snows.
     
  5. justme-

    justme- 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,138

    VERY Important to grease the cylinders! Anything that's chromed needs to be greased to protect it, and probabily several times over the summer you should just check on it to make sure it is still coated. Good white Lithium or heavy (sticky) axle grease works great. Oils like motor oil or WD40 are useless in this case. If the cylinder rams rust and get pits they will have to be replaced because they tear the seals and packing causing the rams to leak.
    Also clean all your electrical connections and grease them with dielectric grease (any auto parts store will have it- even walmart sels it but they call it "bulb grease". This is a semi conductive grease that will protect the connections from rusting.
     
  6. MsQueen

    MsQueen Member
    Messages: 76

    I have black Lithium grease, is that okay to use on the cylinders? I have already put on the dielectric grease into the connections. Thanks.
     
  7. justme-

    justme- 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,138

    Yup, that should be fine. White lith is easy to find here so that's what I use. I don;t see why black should be any different.

    Remember to check on it every so ofton through the season- once a month or so and correct any problems you find- like the grease may need to be reapplied for example.