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Sod pipe / Gravel Guard

Discussion in 'Residential Snow Removal' started by meborder, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    I've been wanting to do this for a long time and finally this week I got it done!

    I used an idea which i saw here and did my best to replicate what i saw.

    I started off with two odd lengths of 2" XX-Strong (0.25" thick) Pipe. I butt welded the pipe together to make them long enough then cut it to the width of my plow.

    It slips over the cutting edge and is attached to the plow blade with 3/16" straps that bolt to the outermost support webs (vanes?) for the blade. I cut spacers to bridge the gap used Gr. 5 hardware to attach the struts to the plow webs (couldn't find Gr. 8 at the time or i would have used that).

    I used the jam-nut method where the first nut is tightened to 7 ft-lbs and the second is tightened to 17 ft-lbs (the proper way of doing it, btw).

    the biggest problem i had (last picture, next post) was my blade is bent. My cut on the pipe was straight, but i had to trace the curve of the blade on the back side so that it fit. went through 3 or 4 cutoff wheels on my grinder by the time i got it right. (where a face shield AND goggles when you do this)

    Here are some pics. Feel free to comment on anything you see as an oversight. I've never made one or used one before so I'm excited to see how it works around the house!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    next post...
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
  2. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

  3. leolkfrm

    leolkfrm PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,434

    looks nice...even better with a coat of paint!....I used an old pair of shoes to attach mine....was also concerned about it rolling so put flat stock on the back
     
  4. upplowin

    upplowin Member
    from UP/MI
    Messages: 54

    I've been using the same set up for years, it work very well...one note though,you should close the end of the pipe up..it will crack & split on you if you don't, but if using for your own drive, it won't be a problem... looks good, nice job.
     
  5. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    Thanks for the comments, i was wondering if i should take the time to close the end or not, but wasn't sure how to do it.

    I suppose i could cut some "half-moon" shape pieces and weld them to the pipe and end strap to close it up.

    sounds like it might be worth my effort.
     
  6. SHAWZER

    SHAWZER PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,153

    Looks good . Maybe heat end of pipe red , close gap with hammer , weld solid ?
     
  7. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    had not thought of that but it would be a good option for someone with a torch...

    i don't have a torch, but it is still a good idea.
     
  8. TJS

    TJS PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,345

    Is this modification for plowing grass ?????. I am wondering what would happen if you hit an imovable object. I don't think it will trip because of the angle of your mechanism.
     
  9. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    yep, for plowing on grass or gravel, or any other un-paved or loose surface. That's the idea anyway.

    I guess i'm not seeing how it will affect the trip function, but i'm fitting to find out.

    the idea is to just essentially replace your cutting edge with a round edge that wont cut or gouge.

    to be clear, it is a trip blade not a trip edge.
     
  10. upplowin

    upplowin Member
    from UP/MI
    Messages: 54

    Yeah the blade will still trip, unless its something very low to ground and they work very well for grassy/gravel areas. Half moon peases would probably be fine for closing the end but if using for your own drive I wouldn't worry about it, just keep eye on it...
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013
  11. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    The only affect it will have on tripping, is that it won't dig in as bad. Should trip less, not because it isn't working, but because its gliding over things that would otherwise trip it.
     
  12. magik235

    magik235 Senior Member
    Messages: 113

    I love my yard guard. Great job fabricating yours.
     
  13. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    thanks for the compliment! I'm excited to see it in action.

    Looks like i get to try it out here today. Had 6" on the ground before i left for work. Expecting a couple more inches and 30mph winds starting at noon.

    yeaah!?

    i'm just hoping nothing breaks!
     
  14. mnglocker

    mnglocker Senior Member
    Messages: 923

    Looks good, the only thing I think I may consider would be swapping out the straps with 2" wide 1/4" stock, but what you have will probably work.

    I wouldn't close the ends, having them open will allow it to drain.
     
  15. JCByrd24

    JCByrd24 Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 232

    Looks good, should work well and last a while. I'm about through my first one after 3 winters on my own driveway, but it's only SCH40. They make a huge difference on gravel and grass, especially when right around freezing.

    I tried a concept on my tractor last year that I will be trying on my truck this year instead of the pipe, which is using angle iron (potentially fabbed of two flat bars to be able to make an angle other than 90 degrees). This is easier to fab than the split pipe, works just like the pipe, but will also provide great backdragging where the pipe really doesn't do well backdragging.
     
  16. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    just got done doing the yard (twice) ... and all i can say is WOW!!!

    Those ski's will NEVER go back on the plow (unless i break the pipe). the pipe is SOOO much better than the feet in every way, except back dragging as noted above.

    the plow doesn't rattle, doesn't trip anywhere near as much, i can push bigger piles, and does every bit as good of a job as it did with the ski's

    the pipe is to ski's as a plow truck is to a loader tractor with no cab -- it's just that much better.

    i couldn't be happier!

    if someone is thinking about trying one ... DO IT!!! it works that well, at least for me it did.
     
  17. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    how did you attach the angle iron over the cutting edge?

    if you have pictures i'd love to see them!
     
  18. JCByrd24

    JCByrd24 Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 232

    I haven't done my truck yet but my plan is to take the cutting edge off and just bolt the angle in place. I only do my own driveway so I figure it will last for many years even though its mild steel.
     
  19. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    that would work pretty well if you build one out of two flats so that the front edge is at the angle of the plow, and the bottom edge is parallel to the ground.

    one could easily hard surface the bottom edge for abrasion resistance to keep it from wearing out.

    I talked to our Welding Inspector at work, and he recommended 8018 for that type of hard surfacing due to its high chromium content, which is supposed to be what you need for low impact abrasion resistance.

    that's a pretty neat idea, and would solve the back dragging problem.

    i've been trying to come up with a way to fashion a back drag edge that would attach to where the plow shoes would normally go.... haven't had much time to think about it though.

    your idea seems plenty simple, though.
     
  20. JCByrd24

    JCByrd24 Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 232

    That's the idea, or perhaps the leading edge up a half inch or so to keep from scraping the gravel or sod.