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Snowplowing Article from Oregon

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by grandview, Feb 18, 2008.

  1. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    Just a story I read. But it didn't say how much was there at the time of the story.

    Snowplowing stir
    Written by Mardi Ford, The Observer February 08, 2008 04:05 pm

    Today is a good day for Walt and Charlene Davis.

    “I’m good now, ’cuz I hear the (neighbor’s) plow’s coming,” Charlene Davis, 64, of Meacham said this morning.

    With a total of 274 inches of snow, the older couple has already paid a neighbor to plow the Forest Service road they live on five times this winter. But the man got behind in his plowing, the snow kept falling and the Davises got snowed in.

    She wasn’t trying to cause trouble when she started calling around looking for someone to plow the access road to her upper Meacham home. But it seems Davis has rattled some cages.

    She heard the governor’s office had sent the National Guard to dig Detroit residents out of their 150 inches of snow. With nearly twice that amount, it seemed reasonable to Davis that some of her tax dollars could be spent on getting her plowed out, too.

    “You know it would only have taken 15 minutes for the state truck that plows part way up the road almost every snow anyway, to do the little job and we would have been free to get out. The guy is even willing to do it, too. But somebody has tied his hands,” Davis said.

    From the governor’s office to the local sheriff’s department, Davis called around the state looking for just one public entity to come plow her road. And with each, ‘Sorry, it’s out of our jurisdiction,’ or ‘We don’t have the funding for that,’ Davis says she got more and more frustrated.

    Earlier this week The Observer got wind of Davis’ situation and ran her story. By Thursday, a Portland television station had used the same pictures featured in The Observer and mentioned the Umatilla County couple’s plight. Thursday afternoon, Davis got a call from a Portland reporter from The Oregonian.

    As the media has raised awareness of this story, the level of anxiety by public officials has evidently kept pace. Davis got an unsettling phone call from one public official whom she refuses to name.

    “I’m not going to mention any names because I don’t want to get into any more trouble,’’ Davis said. “But this guy told me I was causing trouble. And if I didn’t stop calling people, they were going to forcibly remove me from my home.”

    Davis said the official was upset and may have used stronger language than he intended. He called later to clarify his remarks. He said his intentions were to remove her from imminent danger for her own good. He suggested she could stay in a motel in town until the weather conditions at Meacham improved.

    “I asked him who was going to pay for the motel,” Davis said.

    What is most disturbing to her are the impressions she has been left with. Probing questions from the Portland reporter asking how it feels to be trapped in her own home. Questions about the danger of fire and life-threatening accidents.

    “I have kept those dark thoughts away on purpose. Now I can’t stop them. And we’re not trapped in the house. We can get outside. I’m doing my part to keep my place shoveled out. We can get to the road. We could get out the front door until all the snow fell off the roof and blocked it,” she said.

    And then there are the remarks from multiple public officials that Walt, 75, and Charlene are too old to be living in Meacham now and should have been prepared for winter.

    “Prepared? For 274 inches of snow? I’m not in imminent danger here. I have food and water. We have cat food and dog food. We have Internet and ham radio. We have telephones. We have enough gasoline. And we have wood and battery backup in case the electricity goes out,” she said. “I’m not sitting here like some little old lady feeling all sorry for myself, whining and crying. I just asked for one snow plowing.”
  2. streetfrog

    streetfrog Senior Member
    Messages: 337

    I am seriously surprised that Not One person with some equipment has offered to get her cleaned out. That says a sad amount about the comm plow ops out that way. If it was around here several would have done it for nothing. If for no other reason than shoving it in the gov's face.