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Snowdogg 7.5 v plow

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by blc1, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. blc1

    blc1 Junior Member
    from ohio
    Messages: 12

    Has anybody tried putting the vmd75 from snowdogg on a 3/4 ton. They act like it was made for the 1/2 ton trucks but I was wanting to try it on my 3/4 ton because some areas I am in get pretty tight with the 7.5 already.

    Thanks
     
  2. agurdo17

    agurdo17 Senior Member
    Messages: 124

    will not cover the wheels in scoop or v and will barely cover the vehicle width in straight.
     
  3. blc1

    blc1 Junior Member
    from ohio
    Messages: 12

    Wouldn't that be the same problem as a 7.5 straight blade?
     
  4. agurdo17

    agurdo17 Senior Member
    Messages: 124

    a 7.5 in v or scoop is smaller than a 7.5 in straight. its a 1/2 ton plow
     
  5. affekonig

    affekonig Senior Member
    Messages: 909

    Is a 3/4 ton generally much/any wider than a half ton?
     
  6. ALC-GregH

    ALC-GregH PlowSite.com Addict
    from pa
    Messages: 1,132

    Yes. They are wider.
     
  7. agurdo17

    agurdo17 Senior Member
    Messages: 124

    don't get us wrong. It surely can be done, there is a local gm dealer that plows his lot with a 7.5 fisher stainless v and it does fine. just don't do anything crazy like bust through a 3 ft snow bank in v after a big storm or your gonna get hung up. gotta take chunks at it. 8.5 v and you can go right through.
     
  8. affekonig

    affekonig Senior Member
    Messages: 909

    It isn't by much. I'd guess that the 7.5' is a "half ton" plow more because of its weight and the weight of the snow it can hold than the actual width. A 7.5 blade on a 3/4 ton is fine and extremely common, especially if that's what will work best for the route.