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skidsteer tire chains

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment' started by DaySpring Services, Dec 12, 2009.

  1. DaySpring Services

    DaySpring Services PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,065

    I've decided to finally get a set of tire chains for my bobcat. (If I get my blower working properly) I have a S220 with severe duty tires. Where is the cheapest place I can pick up a set and what style is the best for my application. I was looking at some on tirechains.com
     
  2. Cover Guy

    Cover Guy Senior Member
    Messages: 224

    Thats where I get my chains good luck
     
  3. DGODGR

    DGODGR Senior Member
    from s/w co
    Messages: 639

    I just bought (2) pair of Pewag 8mm from a regional cahin specialty company. They ran me about $265/pr. I have been using the LaCleede mud service twist links (about $170/pr). I have not had much luck with them (LaCleedes). They started out with the side links breaking. The twist links are now wearing very rapidly (and breaking because they are thin). I recently put a new set (of La Cleedes) on and they broke (2) of the cross links (that did not show any wear at all).:( I know that skids are hard on chains (especially when used on pavement as I do), and the wear has accelerated since I have started using an employee in my skid. After talking to other contractors I should expect much more life from the Pewags. I am going to start limiting their use, maybe only use them when we get wet and heavy snow or if we are pushing back (and going off the roads etc). I also recommend trying to train the operators to spin as little as possible. My skid is an A300 (all wheel steer) so spin should be minimal since the wheels don't skid while turning.
     
  4. kcress31

    kcress31 Senior Member
    Messages: 451

    Have you thought about studs instead? I am going to put 50 studs in each of my tires for my A 300 when it arrives next week.
     
  5. DGODGR

    DGODGR Senior Member
    from s/w co
    Messages: 639

    Yes, I have considered them as well. My main concern is that I'm not sure if my tires are thick enough now. I know they have plenty of tread left to provide many more hours of use, but I think they may not have enough to prevent the studs from going to deep into the tire. Maybe I will contact one of the manufacturers for an opinion.
     
  6. Spudgunner

    Spudgunner Member
    Messages: 40

    I've had good luck with tirechain.com also. Note: The chains I purchased were for my Toolcat rather than a SS. The chains I purchased have worn well.
     
  7. DaySpring Services

    DaySpring Services PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,065

    What style are you guys running? I was leaning towards either 2 or 4 link.
     
  8. DGODGR

    DGODGR Senior Member
    from s/w co
    Messages: 639

    I am running 4 link spacing with good traction on & off road. I have never used 2 link spacing so I can't make a good comparison. The 4 link offers a pretty rough ride on hard surfaces ( I am using mud service). I am curious how the ride would differ (smoother or rougher?) with 2 link spacing.
     
  9. DaySpring Services

    DaySpring Services PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,065

    Did you buy or need any of the tools for installation or were they the correct size?
     
  10. DGODGR

    DGODGR Senior Member
    from s/w co
    Messages: 639

    I would recommend having a tire chain tool (similar to bolt cutters, but made to expand & crimp) on hand. Occasionaly you made need to use them to replace or repair a cross link, or cross link hook. You could probably get away with not having one, but if you accidentally rub up against a curb (or something) you may bend or stretch the cross link hooks. I you have a tool on hand this is a pretty simple fix. I will assume that by "right size", you mean how much extra chain, or side link tails that may be on the chain after initial installation. This can be addressed with bolt cutters (or any other way one would cut chain), or by hooking the excess with a bungie. I would recommend cutting off the excess (leave at least one extra link). If you leave the excess flapping it will beat up the side of your skid. As far as the Pewags go, we have not yet installed the ones on the skid, so I can't comment on how much excess there was. We did install a new set of Pewags on the loader (20.5x25) and they had about 4 links of excess (ok for the loader).
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2009
  11. DaySpring Services

    DaySpring Services PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,065

    I got my chains on....Hadta take out 2 cross links. How do they look? The probelm I see with them in I spun my machine (very carefully) around to take pics and tore up the blacktop a bit. I may end up taking them off and putting them on during storms. I use my machine to load salt too. I can't see tearing up the blacktop every time I load salt. You can see the marks in front of the snowblower
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  12. DGODGR

    DGODGR Senior Member
    from s/w co
    Messages: 639

    The chain looks like it's on there pretty good, though it is hard to tell since we can't see what it looks like on the inside of the tire. I have never had to remove cross links to get a chain to fit (as long as it was ordered for the correct tire size). I have only had to cut off some of the excess side links (though it looks like you have taken the extra tail and hooked it back to the side links). I would remove the extra instead, unless you think that you may need to use it on another larger tire. I doubt this to be the case since you have removed (2) links from the cross chains. Next time you get chains I would recommend that you get them from a local tire chain supplier (I am assuming that you got those off of the internet). They should be able to get you the correct size. I am sure that you know how much of a pain it was to remove all those cross links (especially on two link spacing), and it would be a shame to have to do it again when it's just not necessary. I also noticed that you went with the (2) link spacing instead of the (4) link spacing. This was probably unecessary for your pavement application, and the (4) link spacing would do less damage to the pavement. Since you removed cross links, I assume you went ahead and bought a chain tool. You can use this to completely remove every other cross link, thus giving you (4) link spacing and you would also have the extra cross chains for later use as spares for when these wear down or as they break. I also noticed that you went with either the La Cleede or some Chinese chain (traditional twist link). I have not been able to get them to last very long on pavement. I also noticed that you mounted your chains to the rear tires. There are a couple of trains of thought on this, but I think ultimately it is owner preference. If you are pushing this seems to be the best way to mount, especially if you are putting so much down pressure that you are unweighting the front wheels. Where this may not be the best installation is when you are lifting/loading the snow/salt or pushing back piles, as the lifting action will unweight the rear tires. Lastly, I'm not sure that it will matter if there is snow on the ground or not, for the pavement damage. The tire chains will contact the pavement through the snow anyway, unless your on packed snow. I would think that the colder the pavement the better it will resist the marks. Unfortunatley there is probably nothing you can do about that , if you want to use chains. As I said the amount of marks may be reduced (but not eliminated) if you were to use (4) link spacing. When I use chains on my A300 it doesn't really do any damage, but I'm not skidding to turn. If it's a problem you may just have to find a way (with technique) to move that snow without the chains.