1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? Explore this quick video tour of updates and enhancements. It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Silverado 2500HD Tires: 235/85R16 vs. 265/75R16

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by Dougman, Nov 29, 2006.

  1. Dougman

    Dougman Member
    from MA
    Messages: 83

    I've read all the current and past threads on the topic and researched all the tire vendor websites... and I am still on the fence. I don't want to reopen old wounds, so I'll keep this as specific as possible: For a 2006 Chevy Silverado 2500HD (Ext. Cab/Reg. Bed) to be used for mostly residential snowplowing with the stock, steel 6.5 inch wide wheels... which is the superior tire size for best fit & function: 235/85R16 or 265/75R16? Unless someone has a better suggestion, I am going with Bridgestone Blizzak W965 tires. Here is their official spec comparison:

    LT235/85R16 Service Description: 120/116Q, Load Range: E, Speed Rating: Q, Sidewall Styling: BW, Article Number: 150-789, Approved Rim Widths: 6.0-7.0, Measuring Rim Widths: (6.5), Overall Tire Diameter: 31.8, Overall Section Width: 9.3, Tread Width: 7.2, Static Load Radius: 14.7, Tread Depth (32nds): 18

    LT265/75R16 Service Description: 123/120Q, Load Range: E, Speed Rating: Q, Sidewall Styling: BW, Article Number: 156-477, Approved Rim Widths: 7.0-8.0, Measuring Rim Widths: (7.5), Overall Tire Diameter: 31.9, Overall Section Width: 10.5, Tread Width: 7.6, Static Load Radius: 14.8, Tread Depth (32nds): 19

    Spec-wise, there is obviously not much difference. The 235 is a little narrower at the tread and might fit the stock 6.5 inch wheel better. The 265 is 0.4 inches wider at the tread and might bulge a little with a slightly under-width stock rim. But that's all I can get from the specs. What about in the real world? Is there any practical difference? Do they drive differently in snow, on ice or on a dry highway? Any more (or less) dry highway noise? Or should I just give up on a scientific comparison and toss a coin???

    Dougman
     
  2. Earthscapes

    Earthscapes Senior Member
    from WNY
    Messages: 577

    I wouldn't go with a smaller tire than the stock 245/75/16 as they are small enough to begin with.
    I do run 265/75/16's on my 90'&02' on stock rims. The 06' only has 6k so no tires needed yet, but that will get 285/75/16's when the time comes.
     
  3. jay723

    jay723 Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 30

    I am in the same boat. I can not make up my mind as to which size. The 235's will be better in the snow, due to less snow to push aside to get traction. The 235's will also help with mileage with the smaller foot print, and will be cheaper. The 265's will fill out the wheel well better. That is what I come up with. I would like to hear from some people running 235's.
     
  4. Plowfast9957

    Plowfast9957 Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    So why not go with a 245 as a happy medium? Thats what usually comes on that truck from the factory.
     
  5. jryden145

    jryden145 Member
    Messages: 86

    A 235/85/16 is the about the same height as a 265/75/16. The 235/85/16 is just narrower than the 265/75/16/. Narrower would be better for plowing.

    J
     
  6. Earthscapes

    Earthscapes Senior Member
    from WNY
    Messages: 577

    I disagree with the narrower tire is better for plowing.
    Your not out trying to drive through 12" of mud or snow, your out there with the blade down in front of you. So in actuallity your making a bigger footprint on the pavement, which gives you better traction.
     
  7. Brothers

    Brothers Junior Member
    from Toronto
    Messages: 25

    tires

    excellent point earthscape..

    needless to say .. i just put on 4 new bridgestones on my 2002 HD ,

    size ... 265/75/R16


    :cool:
     
  8. sw and me

    sw and me Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    Go for the skinny ones

    I run BFG T/A 285 75 16 on summer rims

    and Cooper Weathermaster MS 235 85 16 for the plow season and


    Very happy with both

    THX
     
  9. Dougman

    Dougman Member
    from MA
    Messages: 83

    That's about the long and short of it. I was over at the local Cooper dealership this afternoon after I posted. He wants to sell me the Cooper Discoverer MS. 265/75's are $10 more than the 235/85's... no big deal. He says the Bridgestone Blizzak W965's will wear out too fast. Anyone else feel that way?

    But he was funny about the size thing. He says the 235/85 will likely plow better but that everyone with a Chevy/GMC 2500HD gets the 265/75 "so the truck will look like a truck"!

    That about says it all I guess. Go for the probable small advantage in snow/ice performance... or make your truck look like a truck should look!

    Dougman
     
  10. Dougman

    Dougman Member
    from MA
    Messages: 83

    My daughter calls my oem/stock 245/75's "weenie tires." I've got to admit it... they look like the Chevy dealer played a nasty bad joke on me. No complaints on ride or capability, but they are not snows. And if I've got to buy new snows anyway, I want to dump the "weenie" look as well. Of course, either the 235/85 or 265/75 will solve the weenie issue in terms of diameter... so now it's plowing performance vs. "making the truck look like a truck" as the tire dealer said.

    Dougman
     
  11. jay723

    jay723 Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 30

    so what are you going to do?:confused:
     
  12. Dougman

    Dougman Member
    from MA
    Messages: 83

    Funny you should ask! Just got back from doing it!

    After shopping around for the Bridgestone Blizzak W965's and finding no stocking dealers (I like to see in person what I'm buying) and higher than expected prices, I took another hard look at the Cooper Discoverer MS. Lucky me... It just so happens that the Cooper dealer (another family-owned business) two towns over had four of the 265/75's in stock for me to see. His price was also within my budget. He did not have any 235/85's.

    It turns out that everyone in the tire store owner's family uses the Cooper Discoverer MS on their trucks and SUV's in wintertime, including for plowing. It was no lie either as the vehicles were all parked right there in front for me to see! For a tire store owner's family who could drive on any snow tire ever made, that really impressed me.

    Seeing the tire tread in person convinced me that going with the 265/75's would not be particularly detrimental to the cause. Narrower may have been better, but the 265/75 did not strike me as overly wide. Hardly! In fact, I was amazed at how fast the wheel wells "swallowed up" those supposedly oversized tires. Holy Cow. Maybe not "weenie" tires anymore... but not exactly monster truck-sized either. After examining the end result, I was glad I didn't go any narrower.

    Driving with the bigger snows is a little funky compared to my stock OEM tires, which were impressively solid and functional for their tiny size and all the bad reviews. I tow some awfully heavy stuff and those stock tires drove nice and never let me down. The new snow tires seem a bit "squishy" and soft right now, but not objectionably so.

    Another minor point: While Chevy seems to "diss" any tire size other than stock, they do seem to suggest the 265/75's are an okay alternative tire size in the owner's manual that came with my truck. No mention of 235/85's. While this is no definitive statement by any means, and perhaps I read far too much into it, I figured it could help me on a warranty issue *if* tire size ever came up.

    Dougman
     
  13. snowsniper1

    snowsniper1 Senior Member
    Messages: 239

    i would go w/ the 235,s they will cut through the snow better
     
  14. Detroitdan

    Detroitdan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,937

    But didn't you see where Earthscapes said that isn't true? In spite of all the evidence and knowledge to the contrary?
     
  15. Earthscapes

    Earthscapes Senior Member
    from WNY
    Messages: 577

    Hey moron,

    I never said narrower wasn't better in the snow or mud, I said "while pushing with the blade down, the wider tire makes more contact with the pavement."
     
  16. Detroitdan

    Detroitdan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,937

    And the more contact you make, the more the weight is distributed over more of a slick surface. Therefore less weight and less traction. I don't think you need to call me names, but if you need to to make yourself feel smarter, then suit yourself. You're still wrong, and I think the vast majority of snow plowers will agree with me on this one. It's really not even worth arguing about since we are only talking about the difference between a 265mm wide tire vs 235mm wide tire. If it were a 33-12.50 or something then you would see a big difference. Which is not to say it can't be done, plenty of people plow with wide tires. But a wide tire is not better on snow, plowed or other wise. Have a lovely day.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2006
  17. Antnee77

    Antnee77 PlowSite.com Addict
    from RI
    Messages: 1,056

    All I know is, I have been running 265/75-16 Pro Comp ATs for around 9 months now and they have been great on dry pavement, light off-roading, and in the snow. They grip just fine for me and I have never gotten stuck. And I have had no problems with them on the stock rims. They are a great upgrade from the small stock tires and have no rubbing issues with a stock suspension.
     
  18. Earthscapes,
    You're out on an island on this one. When it comes to driving in the snow, narrower is better, ALWAYS. If you actually think about it, unless you're plowing roads, most of the driving you do is with the plow in the UP position, going from place to place, and if it's during the storm, the worst of conditions are then, when you need the traction the most.

    From my perspective, name calling here will get you nowhere. There are a lot of great guys here with a wealth of knowledge and experience and we're all just trying to help.
     
  19. Dougman

    Dougman Member
    from MA
    Messages: 83

    In theory... and generally in practice... I'll bet you are probably right. Certainly traction is important plow up or plow down... in snow and/or ice... and within reasonable limits, physics being what they are, tire/tread design aside, narrower tires should generally give better traction

    My problem is that we are talking about a relatively small difference in tread width between the 235/85 and 265/75. It is not the inch plus that the tire size designation suggests. It is 0.4 inches according to Bridgestone. And in the case of these particular two tires, we are talking about a specialized... almost extreme... severe snow and ice tire design which tends to concentrate (i.e., reduce) actual tread-to-road contact area. I'm guessing that the design of these two tires here are far more significant in terms of winter performance that the 0.4 inch tread width difference.

    The bigger issue for me personally was best fit and function in the broader sense. In other words, what would give me the best and safest truck performance in *all* winter driving situations including wet, dry and sanded/salted roads. Most of my winter miles will *not* be in deep snow or on untreated ice. And I can always use chains in ultra-extreme situations (where I probably shouldn't be out anyway).

    Like I said above... seeing those 265/75's installed, I am certainly glad I didn't choose to go even narrower. Theoretically, even narrower possibly could have been better in some situations, but these are already narrow enough for my taste. In the end, going more narrow than even my stock "weenie tires" just didn't sit right with me. I'll bet I am still more narrow that most pickup trucks on the road today using those lighter-duty flotation tires.

    That's my story and I'm sticking to it. I respect and appreciate ALL opinions that have been expressed here. I thank all you guys for your thoughts and advice.

    Dougman
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2006
  20. Ron's Lawncare

    Ron's Lawncare Junior Member
    Messages: 24


    so a 6'' wide slick will go through the snow better than an 8'' wide snow tread? my point is tread design is just as important as tire width.